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Archive | April, 2019

Car crashes into medical office

This car crashed into the Metro Health office on White Creek Avenue Monday. Courtesy photo.

An employee of Metro Health Cedar Springs suffered minor injuries Monday when a car drove into the front of their building on White Creek Avenue.

According to the Kent County Sheriff’s Office, a 75-year-old woman struck the building just before 2 p.m. Monday, April 22, while trying to park her car. The car penetrated the brick building, causing significant structural damage.

The driver was not injured and refused medical treatment. An employee of Metro Health suffered some minor injuries, and was transported to the hospital for evaluation.

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Who’s leading you?

Pastor Kristi Rhodes | Hillcrest Community Church | 5994 18 Mile Rd. Cedar Springs, MI 49319

I hope you had a wonderful Easter! Easter represents the greatest day in all of history for all mankind! Everything happened just as Jesus said it would, and just as the prophets foretold hundreds of years before Jesus came to earth. Jesus is Truth and He is incapable of lying or dishonesty.

Jesus said, “The thief (the devil, Satan) comes only to steal and kill and destroy, but I have come that you would have life to the fullest (John 10:10). Satan comes to destroy your family, to destroy your mind, to destroy your health, to destroy your finances, to kill your hope and steal your peace. We are no match for the devil—he’s been around thousands of years.  But the devil is no match for Jesus! Jesus defeated the devil and death when he rose victoriously and conquered the grave. Jesus (the Son of God) appeared to destroy the devil’s work, (1 John 3:8b).  Follow Jesus through His Spirit and live free from the chains of destruction that Satan has tried to bind you with.  

You are a combination of three parts: your body (the flesh), your soul (the mind) and your spirit. We are a spirit that lives in a body that has a mind. Through your body, you relate to the world with your 5 senses. Through your spirit, you relate to the Spirit of light (God) or spirit of darkness (devil) to guide your life. Through your soul (mind), you decide which you will obey. I know it’s kind of deep.  But this is where decisions are made. Joyce Myers wrote a book on this called “Battlefield of the Mind.” You may find it quite helpful if you’re struggling in this area.  

This morning when I got up, I thought I might feast on the leftover chocolate cake for breakfast.  But looking at the swimming pool out the kitchen window, (that we will be opening up soon), I decided maybe that wasn’t the best idea. This was my conscience (mind) telling me that my flesh (body) is wrong. Although the cake was tempting, it was not the best choice.  

God wants us to walk in the Spirit and enjoy the life we were intended to have, life to the fullest, a life of favor and grace. When you make decisions today, listen to your spirit that has first surrendered to God. His still small voice is leading you in the direction your life needs to take so that you may walk in victory over the flesh and the schemes of the devil. You cannot walk in the anointing (Spirit) that God has for you and mirror the devil at the same time. If you follow where the Holy Spirit leads, you will never take a wrong turn!  

Now may the God of peace Himself sanctify you completely; and may your whole spirit, soul, and body be preserved blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ (1 Thess. 5:23).  


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KENNETH S. BECKER

Mr. Kenneth S. Becker of Rockford, Michigan (Courtland Township), age 103, went to be with his Lord and Savior on Wednesday, April 17, 2019. He was born to Albert and Grace (Stewart) Becker on December 9, 1915, in Courtland Township. Ken enjoyed farming, carpentry, camping, and many other things. He was a longtime member of Grange and Courtland – Oakfield United Methodist Church. Ken cherished life and his family. He is survived by his two sons Paul (Linda) Becker and Gary (Debbie) Becker; 13 grandchildren; 22 great-grandchildren; 19 great-great-grandchildren; sister Martha Parker; sisters-in-law, Stella White and June Roberts; and many nieces and nephews. Ken was preceded in death by his beloved wife Erma Becker; son David Becker; daughter Donna Fluger; and grandchildren, Susan Fluger and Jeffrey Becker. Services for Ken were celebrated on Tuesday, April 23, 2019, at Courtland – Oakfield United Methodist Church, 10295 Myers Lake Ave NE, Rockford, MI 49341. Those wishing to offer expressions of sympathy may make a memorial contribution to Courtland – Oakfield United Methodist Church or the North Kent Connect Store, 10075 Northland Dr NE, Rockford, MI 49341.

Arrangements by Pederson Funeral Home, Rockford

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In Loving Memory of BENJAMIN WALL

Our loving husband, dad, grandpa and great-grandpa who joined the Lord eighteen years ago, April 30, 2001. Spring has come and so are all the memories of loving you. Our lives go on without you but nothing is the same. We have to hide our heartaches when someone speaks your name. Sad are the hearts that love you, silent the tears that fall. Living our lives without you is the hardest part of all. You did so many things for us. Your heart was kind and true and when we needed someone, we could always count on you. The special years will not return when we were all together, but the love within our hearts remain. A part of us went with you the day God took you home.

Greatly loved and missing by your loving wife, Rosalynn; sons, Dennis (Cindy), Dean (Kristie); grandchildren, Emily (Marshall), Cory (Mandy), Zachary (Angie), Molly (Matt), Nate (Kalli); great-grand children, Megan, Cody, Allie, Abbie, Maddie (Alex), Izzy, Tristin, Ashley, Aubrey, Easton, Lilly, Landon, Benjamin and Caleb.

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Happy 80th Birthday

Jenny Knapp

Grandma & Great-grandma

April 26, 1939

If you see her wish her a Happy Birthday!

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Eric Church extends Double Down Tour

Grand Rapids — After a rousing start to his Double Down Tour, Eric Church spoke directly to his faithful Church Choir in a video message, announcing additional shows to extend his 2019 trek into the fall. In addition to the previously announced shows hitting more than 25 cities, Church has now added three more dates, including a stop in Grand Rapids at SMG-managed Van Andel Arena on Friday and Saturday, October 4-5, 2019 at 8:00 PM.

Eric Church performs on the Double Down Tour. Photo by Anthony D’Angio.

On March 14, the ACM Album of the Year nominee told his fans “I don’t want to be two months from the end of this thing – so we’re going to play a little more… I can’t thank you enough for what this is and what I’m seeing every night. I appreciate everyone giving me everything they’ve got, and I look forward to seeing you on the road!”

Church has set a new standard for touring with his back-to-back stands in each city of the Double Down Tour, with Rolling Stone pointing out each night’s unique “set list that dwarfs those of his country peers… where loose, funky explorations [are] given just as much space as the singer’s radio hits” and the Kansas City Star noting that the concept works “to showcase Church’s expansive range.” The St. Louis Post-Dispatch also praised the structure of the tour, proclaiming “it was perfection. And then, after two hours and 45 minutes of music, it was over. Until the next night.”

In addition to unique set lists, each night of the tour has also seen elements specific to the host locations themselves. Church’s references to local venues he played in his earliest days and tribute-filled medleys have won crowds over in every city thus far – from Fenway Park classic “Sweet Caroline” in Boston to the falsetto notes of Prince’s “Kiss” in Minneapolis and a twangy version of Eminem’s “Lose Yourself” in Detroit – leading Forbes to declare, “It’s a show where paying tribute to Merle Haggard in the first set and Queen in the second set feels natural.”

Tickets go on sale to the general public beginning Friday, May 3 at 10:00 AM. Tickets will be available at the Van Andel Arena and DeVos Place® box offices and online at Ticketmaster.com. A purchase limit of six (6) tickets will apply to every order. See Ticketmaster.com for all current pricing and availability. *This show will utilize mobile tickets only. All box office purchases will be kept in will call until 2 PM on the day of the show.

A pit ticket pre-sale begins on Tuesday, April 30 at 9:30 AM through the Eric Church Official App with a pre-sale for paid fan club members also running on April 30 from 10 AM through 10 PM.

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What would make Congress better?

By Lee H. Hamilton, former Congressman

Lee Hamilton

A couple of weeks ago I was speaking to a group of students and decided to start with a point-blank question: Is Congress doing a good job? There were perhaps 100 people in the room, and not a single one raised his or her hand.

So I asked the question a different way: Is Congress nearly or completely dysfunctional? Most hands went up.

These were not experts, of course. They were simply reflecting a broad public consensus that things are not working well on Capitol Hill. But they weren’t wrong, either. Things aren’t working well on Capitol Hill.

I can tick off the problems, and so can you. Congress doesn’t follow good process. It seems to have lost the ability to legislate. It’s too polarized and partisan. It’s dominated by political gameplaying, and by the undue influence of money. It defers too readily to the president. Routine matters get bottled up. Its output is low, and it simply cannot pass a budget on time.

“What are the paths that will lead Congress back to relevance, effectiveness, and higher standing in public opinion?”—Lee Hamilton

In fact, there’s a lot it can’t get done: It can’t repair or replace Obamacare, it can’t take action on climate change, it can’t find its way to the grand bargain on fiscal reform that everyone wants, it can’t develop an education policy, it’s unable to address our cyber-security needs, strengthen gun laws, or mitigate extreme inequality.

To be sure, there are things that members of Congress do pretty well. They serve their constituents and are superb at reflecting their constituents’ views. Most are accessible, they understand what their constituents want, they’re adept at aligning themselves with their home districts or states and equally skilled at separating themselves from Congress as a whole. They know how to make themselves look good and the institution they serve look bad.

They’re also people of integrity and talent who want to advance the national interest as they understand it. They’re willing to work exhausting hours in an agitated, dysfunctional political environment. It’s frustrating to look out over Congress and see so many talented, well-meaning people who struggle to make the institution work well.

So what should they do, then? What are the paths that will lead Congress back to relevance, effectiveness, and higher standing in public opinion?

First, it needs to step up to its constitutional responsibilities. The Founders placed Congress first in the Constitution for a reason: it’s not just a co-equal branch, it’s the branch that most thoroughly represents the will and desires of the American people. Yet over the years Congress has kept ceding power to the president.

The Constitution explicitly gives Congress the power to declare war, yet military intervention is now the president’s choice. Congress — and the House specifically — is supposed to take the initiative in producing a budget, but it’s been many years since it exercised that power. Instead, the president submits a budget and Congress reacts.

Up and down the line, in fact, the president sets the agenda and then Congress responds to his proposals. It’s pretty hard to identify a congressional initiative within recent memory.

And it doesn’t just defer to the president. Congress leaves regulatory decisions to federal agencies, with very little oversight. It yields economic power to the Federal Reserve. It’s allowed the Supreme Court to become a central policy-making body on issues from campaign finance to affirmative action to environmental regulation.

And though recent stirrings of independence among both Democrats and Republicans on Capitol Hill are heartening, they’re just that: stirrings. It hasn’t come close to being a co-equal branch of government for a long time. So the first step toward reforming itself is to determine to become one.

In order to do so, however, it needs to attend to some serious internal housekeeping, from rehabilitating the way it goes about legislating to restoring the bedrock principles of good legislating, including negotiation and compromise. In my next commentary, I’ll address those needs in greater detail.

Lee Hamilton is a Senior Advisor for the Indiana University Center on Representative Government; a Distinguished Scholar at the IU Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies; and a Professor of Practice at the IU O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs. He was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for 34 years.


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Dozens of walleye confiscated after tip

From the Michigan DNR

Three walleye anglers fishing together last Thursday, April 18, on the Detroit River, face losing their fishing licenses after being caught with 80 walleye—65 over the river’s legal daily limit of five per person, per day.

Conservation Officer Jaime Salisbury is pictured with 80 walleye that were poached from the Detroit River Thursday, April 18. Photo courtesy of the MDNR.

An anonymous tip to the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Report All Poaching Hotline Thursday afternoon said that three males were suspected of exceeding the walleye limit while fishing the Detroit River. The caller provided a description of the angler’s vehicle and said they were driving from Detroit toward Grand Rapids on I-96 west.

Conservation Officers Peter Purdy and Jaime Salisbury were on patrol in northern Livingston County when they received the notification from the RAP Hotline dispatcher.

After patrolling I-96 for about an hour, Purdy and Salisbury observed a vehicle matching the description provided by the caller. When the driver failed to use a turn signal while changing lanes, the officers stopped the vehicle along the freeway near Okemos Road in Ingham County.

“We asked the driver to be honest and tell us how many walleye the three men had in their possession,” said Salisbury. “The driver hung his head and stated, ‘too many.’”

The three males—a 28-year-old from Byron Center, a 38-year-old from Allendale and a 30-year-old from Jenison—admitted to fishing the Detroit River earlier in the day and that they had all caught and kept too many fish.

“Conservation officers are fully commissioned state peace officers,” said Chief Gary Hagler, DNR Law Enforcement Division. “This gives them the ability to enforce all Michigan laws. In this case, Officers Purdy and Salisbury were able to initiate a traffic stop to seek information about this poaching tip. I want to thank the individual who informed the RAP Hotline about this poaching event; without their assistance, this case may not have been possible.”

The driver received a citation for failing to use a turn signal; all three men were issued tickets for possessing an over limit of walleye. An Ingham County judge will determine the reimbursement fee and whether the poachers should lose their fishing licenses.

Reimbursement is calculated by weighing each individual fish and then assessing at $10 per pound.

The legal walleye limit on the Detroit River is five 15-inch walleye per day. In addition to one day’s daily limit, a person may possess an additional two daily possession limits of fish taken during previous fishing days, provided that the additional limits of fish are processed (canned, cured by smoking or drying, or frozen).

If you witness or suspect a natural resource violation, call or text the Report All Poaching hotline, available 24/7, at 800-292-7800. Learn more about Michigan’s conservation officers at Michigan.gov/ConservationOfficers.

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Deafening

Ranger Steve’s Nature NicheBy Ranger Steve Mueller

Little ponds that dry by mid-summer exude great volume to deafen you at night. One of my great joys is to approach one these ponds in spring. One hears a great cacophony but the pond suddenly becomes silent when approached. If the pond is large enough, the noise continues from the far side. 

Adult Spring Peeper.

Walk slowly around the pond and the noise will cease. If you are moving slow enough, the noise will begin again behind you. Sit and listen. Frogs will quiet with your approach but after a short time of sitting, one frog will sing and others will join. It is breeding season for frogs and they gather from surrounding areas to mate and lay egg masses in temporary vernal ponds. Vernal ponds dry or almost dry by midsummer. 

They are the most important breeding areas for most frogs because egg predators like fish do not survive in ponds that dry. Frogs call with songs unique to their species. Species that deafen us are only the size of your little finger tip. So many gather in the small pond that their joint volume hurts our ears. 

The smallest frogs are spring peepers that spend the summer away from the pond feeding on insects. Their song is a single peep repeated over and over throughout the night. When calling males get hold of a female, they squeeze eggs from her tiny body. His sperm is released on the emerging eggs that are in a jelly mass. The jelly encasing the eggs absorbs water and swells to become as large as the frog or bigger. 

Inside the jelly mass, eggs are two-toned. They have counter-shading with dark tops and light undersides. If they are laid in locations like permanent ponds and this occurs, they are somewhat invisible to fish from underneath because the light color blends with the light sky. From above the dark color blends with the dark pond bottom hiding them from predators. The jelly masses are attached to vegetation holding them in place. 

By the time the developing embryos hatch, the jelly encasing them has become green with cyanobacteria that digests the jelly. The tadpole coming from the egg can break free from the jelly without being stuck and killed. As a polliwog, some nutrition is absorbed from the tail. It feeds on floating aquatic vegetation as an herbivore unlike its adult parents that are predators on insects. The adult and kids do not compete for food. As the tadpole grows legs, its tail shrinks and the diet changes from vegetation to animal matter like insects or other invertebrates. By the time the pond dries, tadpoles become frogs and move into the woods. 

Another small frog that shares the vernal pond is the chorus frog. It is as tiny as spring peepers but can be recognized from the peepers by having three stripes on its back from head to rear. Spring peepers have an X on their back. A chorus frog song can be imitated by rubbing a thumb over the teeth of a comb. Ten thousand of these singing with ten thousand spring peepers is painful to our ears at close range. 

A frog found in breeding ponds that is several times larger is the wood frog. It is brown and has a dark Lone Ranger mask over its eyes. Their song sounds like ducks quacking. Their abundance in ponds is great but I think they are fewer than the smaller frogs. They too can be found throughout the forest in summer. 

Green and bull frogs need permanent ponds for egg laying because most young take two summers to mature. They breed in temporary ponds but survival for their offspring is precarious. Survival will be touch and go depending on how long water remains in the pond. Some vernal ponds persist all year but shrink greatly in size. If fortunate the large frogs might survive the winter in small fish-free pools. American toads breed in almost any water they find. Young develop quickly but mortality is high because tiny breeding pools often dry quickly.

The little frogs lay eggs in permanent ponds and bogs where some survive. If they are away from open water with fish they might be protected for development. Few tadpoles survive to become breeding adults. Populations are declining for several reasons but a big one is the filling or draining of temporary ponds. We can share the world with them by allowing vernal ponds to exist and by using few or no pesticides in nature niches.

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at odybrook@chartermi.net – Ody Brook Nature Sanctuary, 13010 Northland Dr. Cedar Springs, MI 49319 or call 616-696-1753.


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Varsity Red Hawks baseball win two, lose two

The Varsity Red Hawks baseball team squeezed in a pair of games between rainstorms last week at Ottawa Hills.

In game one, despite some control problems, Junior Kyle Wise was able to throw a complete game on the mound, striking out 5. Dylan Williams led the team at the plate with a pair of singles and a pair of doubles. Colton Moor and Kyle Wise added three hits each, including a double. Seth Biggs, Jarrett Hoogerhyde and Nathan Draper also chipped in with a pair of hits each to seal the 19-4 victory.

In game two, the Hawks senior right-hander Nathan Draper hurled a one-hitter, striking out 6 in a 5-inning complete game in a 13-1 victory. Again the boys hit the ball well. Peyton Newman had three hits to lead the team. Bryce Marvel and Trevor Reed each had two singles. Connor Ellison and Seth Biggs each added another hit. Jarrett Hoogerhyde had 2 doubles, and Thomas Reed added a double and a triple.  

This improved the Red Hawks’ record to 5-2. 

On Friday, April 19, the Red Hawks traveled to Forest Hills Eastern for a double header.  

In game one, Seth Biggs combined with Bryce Marvel to complete the game.  Though they both pitched well and only allowed four runs between them, the offense was only able to scatter 7 hits throughout the game. The first inning started with a bang with a single from Thomas Reed and a double from Dylan Williams. Bryce Marvel then drove a ball into the gap, hitting the top of the fence, to score the only two runs for the Red Hawks. Nathan Male also added a pair of singles in the game and Nathan Draper also added a hit. Final score was FHE 4, Red Hawks 2.

In game two, Peyton Newman pitched 4 strong innings before Eastern’s bats did some damage in the 5th. Trevor Reed led the team with three singles. Marvel continued to hit the ball well by adding a single and a double. Williams and Newman each added a single apiece. The final score for game 2 was FHE 10, Red Hawks 3.  

After those games, the varsity record sat at 5-4. This week they play a 3-game series with the Forest Hills Central Rangers. Watch next week’s paper for those results.

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Kent County Credit Union

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