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Red Hawks triumph over Wolves 


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Improve record to 5 and 1

On Friday, October 3, many faithful Red Hawk fans made the trip to cheer on the hometown team when the Red Hawks traveled to Wyoming to meet the Wolves for a first time conference meeting. The Red Hawks proved to be too much for Wyoming by putting up 60 points to the Wolves 28, which put a damper on Wyoming’s homecoming celebration.

Cloudy skies, steady rain and gusting west winds made their presence known as the Red Hawks began their ground assault on the unwilling Wolves defense. But in the end, Wyoming had no answers for Cedar’s offensive grind, which gained 478 yards on the ground and led to six Red Hawks—Kaden Myers, MavRick Cotton, Zach Wamser, Collin Alvesteffer, Anthony Topolski  and Taylor Van Dyke—all finding the end zone throughout the four quarters of the game.

Wyoming quarterback Brendan Berg was 10 for 16 on pass attempts, for a total of 157 yards through the air. The Wolves answered back three times, with scores from the passing attack, and a total offensive effort of 160 yards, which was not enough as the Red Hawk’s defense held steady through the night.

The Red Hawk defense was led in tackles by Cameron Umphrey with six, Anthony Topolski with five tackles, along with Damarcus Barnett, MavRick Cotton, Collin Alvesteffer, Nate Sorensen, Caden Burrows and Lane Gott all adding four take downs for the Red Hawks.

Next week the Red Hawks will journey back to Forest Hills Northern for a 7:00 p.m. contest with the Forest Hills Northern Huskies. This will be a showdown of the top two teams in the OK Bronze Conference. Please come out and make some noise for your Red Hawk Football team!

 

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Red Hawks lose to Wyoming Park; beat up on Eastern


Cameron Link looking to take a shot against Wyoming Park. Photo by K. Alvesteffer.

Cameron Link looking to take a shot against Wyoming Park. Photo by K. Alvesteffer.

By Kendra Coons

On Monday, February 3, the Cedar Springs varsity boys basketball team took on the Wolves of Wyoming Park. It was a tough battle between the Red Hawks and the Wolves, but in the end Wyoming Park took home the win 72-60.

At the end of the first quarter, the Red Hawks were leading 23-21. The Wolves came back after the first quarter and scored 14 more points, but that wasn’t enough to take the lead away from the Red Hawks. Cedar Springs went into halftime leading 38-35. Wyoming fought back and came out after halftime and scored 15 more points to take the lead. Cedar Springs tried to come back after the third quarter and scored 13 points in the fourth, but it wasn’t enough. Wyoming scored 22, giving them the win 72-60.

“Wyoming is a good team, with a lot of athleticism. It was a good for us to play a team that plays a little different style,” commented head Coach Jeff Patin.

Senior Cameron Link and junior Brad Brechting led Cedar Springs in points. Link had a total of 30 points with a shooting percentage of 47.6. Brechting was right behind him coming in at 20 and went 9 for 12 on all of his shots. Wyoming’s Nick Staten led the Wolves in points coming in at 23 and went 7 for 14 on his shots. Coming in second for Wyoming was Jacob Traylor with 17 and a shooting percentage of 35.7.

“I thought we played well for most of the game. It was an up tempo game and we were playing our 3rd game in 4 days, and with about 2 minutes to go, we just couldn’t get the big stop or a basket,” stated Coach Patin.

The boys varsity basketball team also played Forest Hills Eastern this week on Friday, February 7. This was the second meeting of Cedar Springs and FHE. The first time the Red Hawks played the Hawks Cedar Springs defeated FHE 61-57.

In this matchup, it was very close at the beginning. At the end of the first quarter, Cedar Springs was in the lead 20-14 over FHE. After the first quarter, FHE came back fighting hard and scored 11 more points to make the score 30-25 still in favor of the Red Hawks. After halftime, Cedar Springs was still in the grove and added 19 more points to their score to stay in the lead. At the end of the third quarter the score was 49-40. FHE tried fighting back during the fourth, but it wasn’t enough. The final score was 70-55 with Cedar Springs defeating FHE.

“It was a good win for us. This time of year it’s good to win even if you haven’t played your best,” said Coach Patin.

Junior Brad Brechting led the team in points for Cedar Springs coming in at a total of 20. Senior Austin Hilyer was not far behind with 13 and Cameron Link came in third at 10.

“We were able to string some good defense possessions together to extend the lead,” exclaimed Coach Patin.

The boys varsity next game is Friday, February 14 at West Catholic. The team will be looking for their 11th win. So come on out and cheer on your Red Hawks!

 

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Wolves removed from endangered species list


The US Fish and Wildlife Service has decided to remove wolves in the western Great Lakes region from the federal endangered species list. The decision returns management of the species to the state level.
The federal delisting rule removing wolves from the endangered species list will be published in the Federal Register Wednesday, Dec. 28, and will take effect Friday, Jan. 27, 30 days after its publication.
Returning wolves to state management will allow the Michigan Department of National Resources to more effectively manage the species under Michigan’s highly-regarded Wolf Management Plan, which was created through a roundtable process involving interested parties representing viewpoints from all sides of the wolf issue.
“This is great news for the state’s wolf population and for Michigan citizens who have been affected by this issue,” said DNR Director Rodney Stokes. “Treating wolves as an endangered species, when the population has exceeded federal recovery goals in Michigan for more than a decade, has negatively impacted public opinion in areas of Michigan where wolves are established on the landscape. I firmly believe that the more flexible management options allowed under the state’s Wolf Management Plan will help increase social acceptance of the species while maintaining a healthy, sustainable wolf population.”
Once wolves are removed from the endangered species list, the DNR will continue to recommend nonlethal methods of control first, including flashing lights, flagging and noisemakers. In addition, the DNR administers a grant program that provides some funding to livestock owners with depredation issues for improved fencing and guard animals such as llamas, donkeys and Great Pyrenees dogs.
However, in cases where nonlethal methods are not working or feasible, DNR officials will now have the ability to kill problem wolves when appropriate. Under federal Endangered Species Act protection, wolves are protected from lethal control measures except in defense of human safety.
Livestock and dog owners in Michigan will also be able to legally protect their private property from wolf depredation once wolves are removed from the endangered species list.
The Michigan Legislature passed laws in 2008 to allow livestock or dog owners, or their designated agents, to remove, capture, or, if deemed necessary, use lethal means to destroy a wolf that is “in the act of preying upon” (attempting to kill or injure) the owner’s livestock or dog(s). These state laws will go into effect on Friday, Jan. 27, 30 days after the Final Rule is published in the Federal Register.
After the wolf is taken off the federal endangered species list, the animal will remain a protected species in Michigan. There is no public hunting or trapping of wolves allowed in Michigan. The DNR and the US Fish and Wildlife Service will investigate and continue vigorous prosecution of any wolf poaching cases. Illegally killing a wolf is punishable by up to 90 days in jail, a $1,000 fine, or both, and the cost of prosecution. Reports about poaching can be made to the DNR’s Report All Poaching (RAP) Hotline, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at 800-292-7800.
For more information on Michigan’s wolf population and to see the state’s Wolf Management Plan, go to www.michigan.gov/wolves.

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DNRE seeks help to detect presence of wolves


The Department of Natural Resources and Environment today announced it will conduct a survey in the northern Lower Peninsula Feb. 15 through March 14 to detect the presence of gray wolves in that region of the state.
“The purpose of the survey is to verify the presence of wolves both where we have previously confirmed animals and to detect new occurrences in other areas,” said DNRE wildlife biologist Jennifer Kleitch. “Given the low probability of observing a wolf or tracks in the Lower Peninsula it’s helpful to have as many eyes looking as possible. That’s why public reports are so important.”
Wolves are a federally protected species that began naturally returning to Michigan’s Upper Peninsula via Canada and Wisconsin in the early 1990s. Since that time populations have increased and continue to expand their range.  Evidence of range expansion into the Lower Peninsula came when a gray wolf was accidentally killed in Presque Isle County in 2004.  More recently, wolf breeding was verified in Cheboygan County in 2010.
The DNRE is asking the public to report any recent sightings of wolves or tracks they believe were made by wolves to the Gaylord Operations Service Center at 989-732-3541, ext. 5901 during the survey period. Reports of observations can also be submitted online at www.dnr.state.mi.us/wildlife/pubs/wolf_obsreport.asp.
Survey teams will be searching areas where there have been one or more observations. Priority will be placed on recent reports and those submitted during the survey period.
“It’s important that observations are reported in a timely manner so we can work with fresh evidence. If the public finds what they believe are wolf tracks, they should preserve the physical evidence and disturb it as little as possible or take a photo of the tracks alongside a ruler,” Kleitch said. “If someone has a photo of a wolf in the Lower Peninsula, we’d certainly be interested in that as well.”
Information on wolves in Michigan and links to other wolf-related web pages can be found at www.michigan.gov/wolves.
The DNRE is partnering in this survey effort with US Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services, the Little Traverse and Grand Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, and The University of Michigan.

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