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Tag Archive | "vaccine"

COVID-19 vaccinations started Monday at Michigan hospitals


Marc McClelland, 46, a Spectrum Health pulmonary and critical care physician, from Ada, Michigan, was one of the first to be vaccinated Monday, at 12:04 p.m. “To me this is a day of hope,” he said.

LANSING, Mich. – Frontline health care workers at two Michigan hospitals Monday were the first people in the state to receive the safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The first COVID-19 vaccine, produced by Michigan-based Pfizer, and today’s initial vaccinations mark a historic milestone in the world’s unprecedented cooperative mission to control and end the COVID-19 pandemic. The vaccinations at Michigan Medicine and Spectrum Health Butterworth Hospital begin the journey toward the eventual safe full reopening of Michigan’s economy, schools and communities. Additional Michigan hospitals are expected to begin vaccinating health care staff later this week.

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer thanked the state’s hospital and other health care workers for “tireless dedication, bravery and strength” in caring for the tens of thousands of residents who have fought the virus–and for being first-in-line for vaccinations.

“This is a great day for our families, frontline workers, small businesses, and Michigan as a whole. Here, in the state built on innovation and grit, a safe and effective COVID vaccine is being manufactured by Michigan workers at a Michigan business,” Governor Whitmer said. “Our frontline essential hospital workers have gone above and beyond to save lives – including stepping up today to receive vaccines. And we have residents across the state doing their part to eradicate the virus and keep our communities safe. Remember: it will take some time for the vaccine to be widely distributed to everyone. That’s why it’s so important that we all do our part by masking up, practicing safe social distancing, and avoiding indoor gatherings where the virus can easily spread from person to person. This is a historic day in Michigan. We will get through this together.”

In the face of the most massive vaccination effort our world has ever seen, Dr. Joneigh Khaldun, chief medical executive and chief deputy for health with the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, expressed her confidence in the first approved COVID-19 vaccine.

“The significant impact of COVID-19 has led to unprecedented, worldwide collaboration among scientists, medical doctors, health and government officials, and manufacturers,” Khaldun said. “The arrival of this vaccine in Michigan signals that the end of this pandemic is near. However, it will take several months before we are able to have enough vaccine to widely distribute it to the general population. Until then, and even for individuals who receive the vaccine, we should all be doing our part to slow the spread of this virus by wearing masks, avoiding large gatherings, and washing hands.”

Brian Peters, chief executive officer of the Michigan Health & Hospital Association, said the medical, support and executive teams at the state’s hospitals have been on the frontlines treating COVID-19 patients from the start of the pandemic and now “stand proud and grateful to lead the state’s public health and economic recovery from a virus that has devastated far too many lives, families, businesses and communities.”

“As vaccinations start today with the health care heroes at hospitals statewide, Michigan is now on course to move out of the darkness of pandemic to economic and public health recovery,” Peters said.

In the coming days and weeks, vaccine doses will arrive at additional Michigan hospitals and other medical centers across the state. The first Michigan citizens to be vaccinated will be priority hospital and health care workers, and staff and residents of long-term care facilities.

Even with COVID-19 vaccinations starting in Michigan and worldwide, doctors urge everyone to continue to practice preventative measures such as properly wearing masks, social distancing and frequent handwashing to reduce the spread of the virus until the vast majority of people have been vaccinated.

People with questions about vaccines – including the COVID-19 vaccines – should consult a credible source with answers based on medical science. Sources for vaccine information based entirely on medical science include IVaccinate.org, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, and the CDC. A comprehensive set of questions and answers about COVID-19 can be found at Michigan.gov/COVIDVaccine.

Wondering when/where you can get the vaccine?

A consortium of West Michigan health departments, hospitals, healthcare providers, universities and others have launched www.VaccinateWestMI.com where area residents can find the latest information about the COVID-19 vaccine. The site includes information about vaccine availability, local distribution plans, safety and efficacy, and will be updated regularly as new information becomes available.

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Fourth flu-related death reported in Kent County


Testing has confirmed a recently-deceased individual was suffering from the flu. This is the fourth death in someone over the age of 50 in Kent County who was suffering from influenza. The initial test confirms influenza A, but not the strain. (Three earlier cases were H1N1.) In this case, there were additional, known underlying medical conditions. As of January 28, there were 583 reported flu cases in Kent County this season.

“This year, we’ve seen several tragic consequences connected to the flu,” says Adam London, Administrative Health Officer for the Kent County Health Department. “While three of the four cases had known pre-existing medical conditions, we know that the flu has impacted individuals of all ages and health levels.” Nationally, most of the cases of influenza being reported this year are H1N1, which in some cases leads to pneumonia and other severe respiratory issues.

The CDC recommends a yearly flu vaccine for everyone over 6 months of age. The influenza vaccine this year is highly effective protection against the flu, including H1N1. It takes 10-14 days after receiving the vaccination for a person to develop immunity. This is why you often hear people wrongly claim that they got the flu from the flu shot. Multiple studies have confirmed that the flu vaccine does not cause influenza. People can, however, become ill from exposure to contagious people during those 10 – 14 days before their immunity develops.

Some children ages 6 months to 2 years old may require two doses of vaccine (parents should check with a health care provider for details).

The flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and lungs. Flu viruses can spread when people with flu cough, sneeze, or even talk. Someone might also get flu by touching a surface or object (like a phone) that has flu virus on it, and then touching their own mouth, eyes, or nose. Signs and symptoms can include fever, chills, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headaches, fatigue (very tired), vomiting and diarrhea (more common in children than adults). If you think you have the flu, try to limit spreading the illness. Do not go to school or work until you recover.

The Kent County Health Department seasonal influenza program provides vaccinations for all individuals six months of age and older. Vaccines start at $25 for injection, and $33 for FluMist nasal spray. Children from six months through eighteen years who have no insurance, or who have insurance that doesn’t cover vaccines, will pay a sliding scale administration fee of up to $15. The Health Department can only bill Medicaid and Medicare. Cash, check, MasterCard, Visa, or Discover are accepted. To make an appointment at any of our five clinic locations, call (616) 632-7200. You can also schedule online at www.stickittotheflu.com. Flu information is also available on our information only line at (616) 742-4FLU (358).

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H1N1 detected in three recent deaths


 

From the Kent County Health Department

Testing has confirmed three recent deaths in people over the age of 50 in Kent County who were suffering from influenza A (H1N1) virus. Two of the individuals also had other known medical complications; we do not have a medical history yet on the third person. There are over 400 reported flu cases in Kent County so far this season, and of those reported, at least 26 people have been hospitalized.

“In two of these cases, we are certain there were additional underlying medical conditions,” says Adam London, Administrative Health Officer for the Kent County Health Department. “We have seen, in other parts of the state, healthy young adults are becoming extremely ill from H1N1, as well as several deaths.”

In late December, the CDC issued an advisory, noting an increase in severe respiratory illness among young and middle-aged adults due to H1N1 this year.

The CDC recommends a yearly flu vaccine for everyone over 6 months of age. The influenza vaccine this year is highly effective protection against the flu, including H1N1. The CDC recently reported that the influenza vaccination prevented approximately 6.6 million illnesses and 79,000 hospitalizations last year. It is critically important that people get a flu shot now. It takes 10—14 days after receiving the vaccination for a person to develop immunity. This is why you often hear people wrongly claim that they got the flu from the flu shot.

Multiple studies have confirmed that the flu vaccine does not cause influenza. People can, however, become ill from exposure to contagious people during those 10–14 days before their immunity develops. Some children ages 6 months to 2 years old may require two doses of vaccine (parents should check with a health care provider for details).

The flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and lungs. Flu viruses can spread when people with flu cough, sneeze, or even talk. Someone might also get flu by touching a surface or object (like a phone) that has flu virus on it, and then touching their own mouth, eyes, or nose. Signs and symptoms can include fever, chills, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headaches, fatigue (very tired), vomiting and diarrhea (more common in children than adults). If you think you have the flu, try to limit spreading the illness. Do not go to school or work until you recover.

The Kent County Health Department seasonal influenza program provides vaccinations for all individuals six months of age and older. Vaccines start at $25 for injection, and $33 for FluMist nasal spray. Children from six months through eighteen years who have no insurance, or who have insurance that doesn’t cover vaccines, will pay a sliding scale administration fee of up to $15. The Health Department can only bill Medicaid and Medicare. Cash, check, MasterCard, Visa, or Discover are accepted. To make an appointment at any of our five clinic locations, call (616) 632-7200. You can also schedule online at www.stickittotheflu.com. Flu information is also available on our information only line at (616) 742-4FLU (358).

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Low-cost vaccine and dog licensing clinic


(Grand Rapids, MI) — The Kent County Animal Shelter and Humane Society of West Michigan are teaming up to host a low-cost vaccination and dog licensing clinic on Saturday February 19 from noon to 3 pm at the Kent County Animal Shelter, 740 Fuller Avenue NE, Grand Rapids, MI. This clinic is open to all dogs in the West Michigan area.
At the clinic the Humane Society will offer distemper vaccinations for $10, microchipping for $10, and rabies vaccinations for $15. This clinic is for dogs only and will only be offered to those purchasing or renewing their dog license. No appointment is necessary.
Dog licenses are $11 for altered dogs and $24 for unaltered dogs. For senior owners (62+), licenses are $6 for altered dogs and $12 for unaltered dogs. All prices double after March 1 and owners are subject to citation and/or misdemeanor charges. All licenses require proof of current rabies vaccine and spay/neuter status. Licenses are also available at the Kent County Animal Shelter and Humane Society of West Michigan.
For more information on the dog licensing vaccination clinic, please call Humane Society of West Michigan at (616) 453-8900 extension 210 or the Kent County Animal Shelter at (616) 632-7300.

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