web analytics

Tag Archive | "vaccinate"

Protect Michigan pets and livestock


Vaccinate before summer

 

Now that it’s spring, animal health officials at the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) are reminding Michigan owners that vaccinating pets and livestock protects them from diseases, even if they are exposed to an infected animal or disease-carrier, such as mosquitoes and ticks.

“Vaccinating, deworming, and routine animal health activities should occur in the spring before moving to sales, exhibitions, or even before going on vacation,” said State Veterinarian Dr. Steven Halstead. “State law also requires all dogs six months and older to be licensed. To get a license, an owner must show proof that a veterinarian has vaccinated the dog against rabies, and that the vaccine is current. Each year we remind animal owners of the importance of vaccinating, which not only protects the pet, but also the food-animal industry.”

Core vaccines are recommended for most pets. Additional “non-core vaccines” (e.g., feline leukemia, canine kennel cough and other vaccines) may be appropriate if the animals are going to pet care facilities, kennels, or shows where they will be co-mingling. Additionally, pet and livestock owners are encouraged to have their veterinarian check for internal parasites and heartworms.

MDARD recommends owners speak with their private veterinarian regarding the following vaccinations:

Dogs: rabies, canine distemper, parvovirus, and adenovirus. In addition, owners should have the dogs checked for heartworm and intestinal parasites. Some veterinarians also recommend vaccination against leptospirosis and treatment to prevent Lyme disease.

Cats: rabies, herpes virus, calicivirus, and panleukopenia.

Horses: MDARD mandates Equine infectious anemia (EIA) testing if traveling to a public event, as part of a sale, or importing a horse into Michigan from another state; and owners should talk to their veterinarian about the following vaccines: Tetanus toxoid, rabies, Eastern and Western Equine Encephalitis, West Nile Virus, and Rhinopneumonitis (EHV-1 and EHV-4).

Horse owners should prepare to follow these tips to prevent mosquito-borne illness:

Vaccinate your horses. Inexpensive vaccines for EEE and WNV are readily available and should be repeated at least annually. It is never too late to vaccinate horses. Talk to your veterinarian for details.

Use approved insect repellants to protect horses.

If possible, put horses in stables, stalls, or barns during the prime mosquito exposure hours of dusk and dawn.

Eliminate standing water, and drain troughs and buckets at least two times a week.

Sheep and goats: CD-T toxoid provides three-way protection against enterotoxemia (overeating disease) caused by Clostridium perfringins types C and D and tetanus (lockjaw) caused by Clostridium tetani. The large animal rabies vaccine is approved for use in sheep. No rabies vaccine is currently licensed for goats.

Cattle: Infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (commonly called IBR); Bovine Viral Diarrhea, PI3, BRSV (viruses causing pneumonia/sickness); Leptospirosis (5-Way); Vibriosis; Calfhood vaccination for Brucellosis; Bovine Tuberculosis testing in the Modified Accredited Area (contact MDARD for additional information).

For information on animal health fair requirements visit: http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mda/ExReq_225448_7.pdf

Posted in NewsComments Off

One-day flu vaccination clinic


Did you get vaccinated against flu yet? All locations of the Kent County Health Department are offering a flu vaccination clinic on Thursday, December 1, from 8 a.m. until 12 noon.  This one-day clinic will offer low-cost or free vaccinations for individuals who are uninsured or have insurance that does not cover flu vaccines.  Participants must be between the ages of 19 and 64 for this one-day clinic.
Fees for the vaccine are $15 or less, based on a sliding scale.  Supplies are limited, and you must have an appointment to take advantage of this special opportunity.  We have clinics in Kentwood, Wyoming, Rockford, and Grand Rapids (700 Fuller NE and the Sheldon Complex). Please call 616.632.7200 to set up your appointment.

Info from the Centers of Disease Control:

What is influenza (also called flu)?
The flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and lungs. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. The best way to prevent the flu is by getting a flu vaccine each year.
Signs and symptoms of flu
People who have the flu often feel some or all of these signs and symptoms:
Fever* or feeling feverish/chills
Cough
Sore throat
Runny or stuffy nose
Muscle or body aches
Headaches
Fatigue (very tired)
Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.
*It’s important to note that not everyone with flu will have a fever.
How flu spreads
Most experts believe that flu viruses spread mainly by droplets made when people with flu cough, sneeze or talk. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby. Less often, a person might also get flu by touching a surface or object that has flu virus on it and then touching their own mouth, eyes or possibly their nose.
Period of contagiousness
You may be able to pass on the flu to someone else before you know you are sick, as well as while you are sick. Most healthy adults may be able to infect others beginning 1 day before symptoms develop and up to 5 to 7 days after becoming sick. Some people, especially young children and people with weakened immune systems, might be able to infect others for an even longer time.
Complications of flu
Complications of flu can include bacterial pneumonia, ear infections, sinus infections, dehydration, and worsening of chronic medical conditions, such as congestive heart failure, asthma, or diabetes.
Who should get vaccinated?
Everyone 6 months and older should get a flu vaccine each year. This recommendation has been in place since February 24, 2010. While everyone should get a flu vaccine each flu season, it’s especially important that certain people get vaccinated either because they are at high risk of having serious flu-related complications or because they live with or care for people at high risk for developing flu-related complications.

Posted in HealthComments Off

Animal shelter gets grant to vaccinate dogs for influenza


Petfinder.com furnishes funds to protect shelter dogs from canine flu

sick dogKent County Animal Shelter, Grand Rapids, now has help in protecting dogs against canine influenza virus (CIV), a highly contagious disease that spreads easily from dog to dog, especially those in close proximity. The shelter received a grant for the vaccines as part of a Petfinder.com Foundation program to build community immunity against this respiratory infection. The foundation partnered with Intervet/Schering-Plough Animal Health, a global animal health company and makers of the NOBIVAC(r) Canine Flu H3N8 vaccine, to fund the grant.
Because CIV is relatively new, most dogs have not built up immunity to the disease. Dogs can get the disease by being exposed to those that have it, as well as playing with toys or drinking from bowls used by other dogs. People can also unwittingly spread the germ if they come in contact with infected dogs.
“Shelters and rescue organizations are often the first places that new diseases already in the community become evident. Dogs come in from the community and are released back into it, and often move to and from states with confirmed cases,” said Liz Neuschatz, director of the Petfinder.com Foundation. “Canine flu can be a real problem for shelters, where one sick dog can cause an outbreak through an entire facility. We are pleased to be part of this effort to help protect the community by providing canine flu vaccine to Kent County Animal Shelter.”
Dog flu is a growing problem throughout the U.S. It has been confirmed in 34 states so far, but tracking the disease is hard because it is so difficult to diagnose. Dogs are contagious before they show any symptoms. By the time the dog starts coughing, it’s too late. Virtually all dogs exposed to the virus will become infected, and some will get more serious infections, such as pneumonia, which can be fatal.  Dogs that go to doggie daycare, boarding facilities, groomers and shows and are vaccinated for canine cough (Bordetella) are also at risk for canine flu.  Information about canine flu is available at www.doginfluenza.com.
The grant for Building Community Immunity seeks to protect all at-risk dogs in the community, including those in close proximity with other dogs, as is the case with shelters and rescue facilities. It also provides greater assurance to adopting families that their new pets will be healthier and much less likely to be sick or get more serious, and sometimes fatal, infections. The grant further links PetFinder.com member shelter and rescue grant recipients with local veterinarians to protect all adoptable dogs in their care. The program promotes veterinary visits for wellness exams and, when appropriate, the second dose administration of Nobivac Canine Flu vaccine.
The Petfinder.com Foundation was created in 2003 to respond to needs of its Petfinder member shelters and rescue groups and to assist them in ensuring that no pet is euthanized for lack of a home. The vaccine grant will help keep dogs healthy and adoptable.

Posted in Featured, NewsComments Off


advert

LOCAL Advertisers

The POST
Bryne Electrical

Get the Cedar Springs Post in your mailbox for only $35.00 a year!