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Tag Archive | "Traffic crashes"

Michigan traffic crashes come with hefty price tag


New report compares societal costs of crashes, crime

From The Office of Highway Safety Planning

While index crimes resulted in $622 million in monetary costs during 2015, the price tag for traffic crashes exceeded $4.6 billion in monetary costs, according to a new report released by the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute.

The study, funded by the Michigan Office of Highway Safety Planning (OHSP), used 2015 traffic crash and index crime data to estimate dollar losses to the state and for each county. Monetary costs include medical care, future earnings, public services and property damage and loss. Non-monetary quality-of-life costs include those associated with pain, suffering and fear. 

When further expanded to include monetary and non-monetary quality-of-life costs, index crime costs totaled $2.6 billion in 2015, while traffic crashes resulted in $19.3 billion in total costs, according to the report. For index crime, these values come from jury awards for pain, suffering and lost quality of life due to physical injuries or fear. Index crimes include murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny and motor vehicle theft. 

“This report underlines the vital role of traffic safety efforts in our state,” said Michael L. Prince, OHSP director. “Traffic crashes come with a tremendous personal toll and an enormous price tag. Using federal funds for seat belt and drunk driving patrols throughout the year helps save both the lives and the money of our state’s residents.” 

The five counties with the highest crash costs are Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Kent and Genesee. Keweenaw County had the lowest crash costs.

Alcohol-involved crashes accounted for $800 million in monetary costs and $3.9 billion in total costs. Injury-crash involved unbuckled occupants accounted for $500 million in monetary costs and $2.6 billion in total costs. Crashes involving teen drivers accounted for almost $800 million in monetary costs and $3.2 billion in total costs. Motorcycle-involved crashes accounted for $300 million in monetary costs and $1.8 billion in total costs. 

Researchers found that both traffic crashes and crime impose significant economic and social burdens on individuals and society through injury and loss of life, as well as property damage and loss. Efforts to reduce crashes and crime often result in competing demands for scarce public resources. Comparable and up-to-date cost data on crashes and crime contribute to informed decision making about allocation of these resources.

The first crime/crash report was generated in 1988. At that time, Michigan traffic crashes resulted in $2.3 billion in monetary costs and $7.1 billion in total costs. Similar studies were conducted in 1994, 1999, 2004 and 2009. The 2015 report, which includes county-by-county information, is available at www.michigan.gov/ohsp.

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Two trucks collide at 17 Mile and White Creek


Two trucks crashed after one ran the red light at 17 Mile and White Creek Sunday afternoon. Courtesy photos.

Two trucks crashed after one ran the red light at 17 Mile and White Creek Sunday afternoon. Courtesy photos.

Drivers disregarding the stoplight at 17 Mile and White Creek resulted in two traffic crashes in only four days. The first one occurred Sept. 14.

Then, on Sunday, September 18, 2016 at approximately 3:49 p.m., the Kent County Sheriff Department responded to another personal injury crash at the intersection of White Creek Avenue and 17 Mile Road, this one involving two pickup trucks.

A 54-year-old Rockford woman was travelling eastbound on 17 Mile Rd near White Creek in a 2004 Ford F150 when, according to witnesses, she disregarded the stoplight and struck a northbound 1999 Ford F250, driven by a 34-year-old Sparta man.

The crash caused the northbound F250 to roll. Both occupants of that vehicle, a 34-year-old Sparta man and a 36-year-old Sparta woman, were transported to Butterworth Hospital via Rockford Ambulance with non-life-threatening injuries.

The driver of the eastbound vehicle was transported to Blodgett Hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

Cedar Springs Fire Department assisted with the crash scene. The crash remains open and under investigation, so names have not yet been released. Alcohol is not believed to be a factor.

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Traffic crashes and fatalities up in 2013


Drug-involved, truck-involved and bicyclist deaths on the rise

N-Fatal-crashes

For the second year in a row, traffic deaths increased in Michigan, fueled in part by increases in bicyclist, drug, and commercial motor vehicle (CMV)-involved deaths, according to the Michigan State Police (MSP) Criminal Justice Information Center.

Although the state has experienced significant decreases in traffic crashes over the past decade, from 391,486 in 2003 to 289,061 in 2013, fatalities increased 2 percent from 936 in 2012 to 951.

The biggest jumps occurred in drug-involved fatalities, which increased 22 percent from 135 in 2012 to 165 in 2013; bicyclist deaths, which increased 35 percent, from 20 in 2012 to 27 in 2013; and CMV-involved fatalities, which increased 18 percent, from 80 in 2012 to 94 in 2013.

“Michigan’s 2013 statistics mimic national trends,” said Col. Kriste Kibbey Etue, MSP director. “In recent years there has been an upswing across the country in fatalities involving large trucks, bicyclists, pedestrians and impaired driving.”

Despite an overall increase in traffic fatalities, teen fatalities, ages 13-19, fell for the second year with 69 deaths in 2013 compared to 85 in 2012.  In addition, young driver-involved deaths, ages 16-20, declined 5 percent from 142 in 2012 to 135 in 2013.

In other areas:

Cell phone-involved crashes decreased 8 percent, from 748 in 2012 to 689 in 2013. Cell phone-involved fatal crashes decreased from 8 in 2012 to 4 in 2013.  (Michigan cannot track crashes involving texting specifically.)

Pedestrian fatalities increased 9 percent, from 137 in 2012 to 149 in 2013.

The number of crashes involving deer increased 1 percent, from 48,918 in 2012 to 49,205 in 2013, and deer-involved fatalities increased by 50 percent from 8 deaths in 2012 to 12 in 2013.

Injuries increased 1 percent, from 70,519 in 2012 to 71,031 in 2013.

Alcohol-involved traffic deaths increased 1 percent, from 281 in 2012 to 284 in 2013.

Motorcyclist fatalities decreased 1 percent, from 129 in 2012 to 128 in 2013.

NOTE:  Additional 2013 crash information will be posted to Michigantrafficcrashfacts.org in the coming months.  Check frequently for updates. Information regarding crashes can be found at Michigan.gov/crash.

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