web analytics

Tag Archive | "tires"

Tires stolen from car dealership


Tires were stolen from two trucks at Sparta Chevrolet earlier this week. Photos from Sparta Chevrolet Facebook page.

Photos from Sparta Chevrolet Facebook page.

Police are looking for the suspects that stole two sets of tires from trucks earlier this week at Sparta Chevrolet, 8955 Sparta Avenue, in Sparta.

The Kent County Sheriff Department confirmed that two sets of tires were discovered stolen on Tuesday morning, February 27. Upon arrival Tuesday morning, employees found two of their midnight edition 1500 Silverados sitting on blocks. 

Be on the lookout for two sets of 265 65 r18 Goodyear Wrangler Duratrac tires on GM black wheels bolt pattern 6×5.50. Police believe they may show up on ebay, Craigslist, or some other sale sight.

If you have any information, please call Silent Observer at 616-774-2345. 

Posted in NewsComments (0)

Here comes the rain: Expert tips for wet weather driving


CAR-Here-comes-the-rain

(BPT) – When it comes to driving in the rain, windshield wipers, headlights and brakes will only get you so far. More than 1 million car crashes occur each year as a result of weather conditions, according to the Federal Highway Administration. Most of them have to do with wet roadways, and many of them could likely be prevented by the right set of tires.

As El Niño looms in the West, and the inevitable April showers approach elsewhere, drivers across the United States should turn their attention to the rubber that meets the proverbial—and also very literal—wet road.

Nearly a quarter of all car crashes are caused by weather, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation. Of those, nearly three quarters can be attributed to wet pavement. When roadways are slick, dangers such as skidding and hydroplaning quickly become concerns. Tires can be the best defense against such hazards, as a healthy, reliable set of tires will give your vehicle the traction it needs to safely stop and corner on slick roadways. Before the tires can do their job, drivers will need to take a few steps of their own.

Before you hit the road, know what to look for on your tires.

Tire tread helps to channel rainwater safely between your tires and the road – but only if there’s enough tread available to do so. When new, tire tread runs 9/32 of an inch deep. Tires are legally worn out with just 2/32 of an inch of tread remaining, but this doesn’t leave enough depth in wet conditions.

Tire Rack, America’s largest independent tire tester and consumer-direct source for tires, makes an even safer recommendation. “When rain is a concern, as it will be for much of the U.S. throughout the spring, drivers should replace their tires when they reach 4/32 of an inch of remaining tread depth,” says Woody Rogers, product information specialist at Tire Rack. “By the time you reach 2/32 of an inch, your tires won’t have enough tread to avoid hydroplaning.”

To make sure that your tread is deep enough to keep your tires firmly rooted on the surface of the road, Tire Rack recommends a simple quarter test. Place a quarter upside down into the grooves on your tires. If some part of George Washington’s head is covered by tread, then you have at least 4/32 of an inch left. “The difference between 2/32 of an inch and 4/32 is admittedly very small,” Rogers says, “but the impact on safety is quite large.”

If hydroplaning occurs, coast carefully.

Hydroplaning happens when water on a roadway and vehicle speed combine to cause one or more of your tires to lift from the surface of the road. When this happens, the vehicle’s steering wheel will likely jerk, and the vehicle could pull abruptly toward the puddle.

“Slowing down in rainy conditions is always a good idea, but it may not be enough for the surprise waiting up ahead. Having the appropriate tread depth is a must for preventing hydroplaning,” Rogers says. “If you do hydroplane, grasp the steering wheel firmly and avoid slamming on the brakes. Braking could end up worsening the skid, causing you to lose even more control of the vehicle.”

Driving in the rain is never fun, but with the right tires, it can at least be safer. When the rubber meets the road, make sure it’s up for the job. Tire Rack offers more expert tips and finds the right tires for your vehicle at www.tirerack.com.

Posted in FeaturedComments (0)

Forget something? 


 

CAR-Forget-somethingDrivers forget where they park and more

(BPT) – Although our everyday routines can be simple and second nature, there’s only so much we can remember. And when it comes to cars and car maintenance, many Americans frequently forget routine tasks, according to the latest Gauge Index from Hankook Tire.

When running errands, we park our cars, walk into the store, check our lists, pay for what we need, get back in our cars and drive to the next stop. But most Americans have found themselves wandering around a parking lot because they can’t find their car, according to Hankook Tire’s Seasonal Gauge Index. In fact, the Gauge revealed that 55 percent of Americans have forgotten where they parked at least once.

Hankook also found that a significant number of drivers have gotten into trouble after parking by locking their keys in the car. Forty-one percent of Americans have had to call a locksmith or find a spare set of keys to get back on the road.

When you are in the thick of daily errands, there is likely a need for a fuel stop. The stress that can come with the overwhelming daily list of things to do can distract you from the little things you need to do, like closing the gas cap. One third of Americans have forgotten to put the gas cap back on after fueling up, according to the Gauge Index. Further, more than a quarter of Americans have a tendency to drive off with items on the top of their cars such as groceries, a cup of coffee or even a purse.

For those who forget how to get where they need to go, the Gauge Index revealed that 40 percent of drivers use a GPS device to get them headed in the right direction.

All of this is a reminder to slow down and remember the little, albeit important details of driving, and make sure that your car is in proper working condition.

Keep your tires cool and properly filled. Heat can take its toll on tires, so try to park in the shade as often as possible. Filling tires with the correct air pressure also will help keep the temperature down within the serviceable range. Remember to check tire pressure monthly.

Rotate your tires. Each tire can wear unevenly, and tires on the front axle tend to wear differently than tires on the rear axle. Regular tire rotation ensures more even wear. Tires should be rotated about every 5,000 miles.

Choose the right tire. While we can forget where we parked, we can also forget what kind of tires are on our car. Make sure your car is running on the right, season-appropriate tires.

For more info visit www.hankooktireusa.com.

Posted in FeaturedComments (0)

The perfect car tips for any trip


CAR-Car-tips1

(BPT) – Across the country people are planning to take longer road trips this year. If you plan to be one of them, here are five maintenance tips to consider for today’s cars.

* New tires? “For four-wheel drive cars and trucks, buy new tires as a complete set,” says RockAuto.com Engineer and Vice President Tom Taylor. “Mixing old and new tires or just mixing tire brands can create small differences in tire diameter that may be enough to overheat and damage four-wheel drive parts.”

* What spare tire? Adding air to the spare used to be all that was needed, but many newer cars do not have a spare tire. They may have “run-flat” tires or come equipped with an air compressor and sealant. Become familiar with your vehicle’s spare tire system before you leave town and decide if it is adequate. Maybe you will want to upgrade to a full size spare.

CAR-Car-tips2* Why new struts? Pushing down on a fender and counting the bounces is not a good test for the shocks and struts on modern cars. “Some people are happy that their struts seem to be lasting forever but they don’t realize that the struts actually wore out thousands of miles ago,” says Taylor. “Bad struts lead to unnecessary wear on a whole slew of additional parts including the brakes, rubber boots, suspension bushings and engine mounts.” For the safest handling and braking, replace your struts and shocks at 50,000 miles or at the mileage recommended by the manufacturer.

* Just the belt? Modern engine belts last a long time. Most car owners do not resist when their mechanic tells them it is time to replace the belts after many miles or years. “Owners should listen to their mechanics when they are told the belt tensioners need to be replaced along with the belt,” says Taylor. “Those are the spring-loaded pulleys that keep the belt at the correct tension. Putting a new belt on old tensioners can mean premature wear on the new belt or damage to the alternator or other components spun by the belt.”

* Hose looks new? New engine hoses also now last much longer than they used to. Hoses do eventually fail and the damage often starts in the hose’s inner layers where it is out of sight. A burst radiator hose still means a disrupted trip and today’s aluminum alloy engines are often even more susceptible to heat damage. Follow the guidance of your repair manual or mechanic on when to replace hoses.

Some owners may get away with leaving a radiator hose untouched for decades, but for the rest, common sense assessment of risks and rewards shows why these tips are worth following.

Posted in FeaturedComments (0)

Five winter car care tips that save you money


CAR-Five-winter-car-care-tips

(BPT) Winter is when car trouble can cause big financial problems. So how do you keep your car winter-ready for severe weather and protect your budget? The right preventive care is essential, and the good news is that there are many simple things you can do to get your car ready for extreme weather without blowing your budget.

Before severe weather strikes, make sure to check these items off your car-care list:

* Avoid the “E.” A full tank of gas provides a comforting feeling. It’s also an effective way to protect your car in severe weather. An empty tank leaves room for the moisture inside to turn to ice. Keep your tank at least half full at all times to help prevent starting issues caused by a frozen fuel line.

* Check vital fluids. As simple as filling up, make sure to check and top off your vehicle’s antifreeze and examine your brake system, which includes your brake fluid.

* Double-check the tires. Driving on underinflated or worn tires makes it even more difficult to drive in ice or snow. Use a tire gauge to test the tire’s actual pressure and apply air as needed. Your tires should have the appropriate amount of pressure printed on its side. To check the wear of your tires, insert a penny into the tread. If you can see any part of Abraham Lincoln’s head, it’s time to replace the tires.

* Be ready to battle ice. Ice on the roads is one problem, but ice on your windshield is another problem entirely. Prestone’s De-Icer Windshield Washer Fluid is designed to help melt ice and frost fast for streak-free and clear visibility down to -27 degrees.

* Prep for emergencies. Sometimes even the best planning can’t prevent a severe-weather accident. That’s why it’s good to pack a winter survival kit with an ice scraper, shovel, blankets, extra clothing, bottled water, jumper cables and a first aid kit for the backseat or trunk of your car. And don’t forget the cat litter—in case your tires need a little extra traction.

Not all winter car care maintenance needs to be handled in a mechanic’s garage. Easy DIY projects can help ensure your vehicle’s performance this winter and save you time and money in the long run. Get started on your preventive list today and you’ll be ready for whatever the season brings.

Posted in FeaturedComments (0)


advert
Advertising Rates Brochure
Kent Theatre
Ensley Team Five Star Realty

Get the Cedar Springs Post in your mailbox for only $35.00 a year!