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Tag Archive | "The Cedar Springs Post"

Happy birthday, Cedar Springs Post


By Post editor, Judy Reed

What were you doing, in July, 29 years ago, when the Cedar Springs Post was born? Some of the headlines for July 1988 included:

  • USSR launches Phobos II for Martian orbit
  • Sting performs first rainforest concert
  • Florence Joyner runs 100m in 10.49 seconds for world record
  • 4 billion tv viewers watch Nelson Mandela’s 70th birthday tribute
  • Michael Dukakis selected as Democratic presidential candidate
  • Pedro Delgado wins Tour de France
  • Gorbachev pushes plan to elect president and parliament in March
  • Cedar board sets millage election to recover earlier budget cuts

Many people that have grown up here (at least those under 30) don’t remember what it was like not to have their own hometown newspaper. The previous newspaper, The Cedar Springs Clipper, served the area well for over 100 years. Once it closed, the area relied on out-of-town newspapers for several years to publish only bits and pieces of Cedar Springs news, much like area newspapers do today. Then on July 28, 1988, Roger and Alice Allen, founders of the Rockford Squire, rented out an office from Sipple TV, on 36 E. Maple Street in Cedar Springs, and started the great little newspaper you still have today—The Cedar Springs Post.

Roger’s daughter, Lois, took over operation of the paper, with her mother Alice, in 1989, and she’s still holding the paper to a strong standard today. The introductory issue of the Post pledged that “the community will once again receive the concentrated attention of its own local newspaper. The newspaper will be dedicated entirely to Cedar Springs and to the Cedar Springs area, and should prove to be the stimulus that the district needs to reach its highest potential.” Those are lofty words, but a promise that we still strive to fulfill today. We try to deliver the news you can use each week. In addition to the regular “hard” news such as accidents and fires, where else will you find what size catfish Johnny caught, who won the spelling bee, what the women’s club did last week, and who was arrested for drunken driving? Nowhere! Because the other papers don’t care but we do. This newspaper is about you and for you. And it will continue to be as long as we’re here.

Many people don’t realize that we wouldn’t know much about the history of our area if weren’t for the local newspapers. The Clipper told us about the early days of our town and the surrounding townships. And we can find most issues on microfiche at the Cedar Springs Historical Museum. That’s 100 years of history! The Post carries on that heritage by having a year’s worth of Post newspapers bound in a book each year. We then give that book to the Museum so that future generations can look back on the history we are living today.

Our readers tell us they love the paper. We continue to print 5,000 copies each week with the bulk delivered to newsstands and businesses, and they are gone within days. We wish we were able to cover even more of your local news and print more copies; but as advertising evolves, our revenues have declined, and so has our budget and our staff. The paper is free to our readers, but printing the paper is not free. We have overhead such as payroll, taxes, equipment, and supplies, along with the cost of just getting the paper printed. The Post is supported 100 percent by local businesses advertising on our pages. We sincerely appreciate those businesses that choose to advertise with us because they know that the newspaper and the information it supplies is important to this community.

Besides our printed paper, you can also visit our website at www.cedarspringspost.com to read some of our news stories, or you can download our e-edition from our website, which is an exact replica of our printed paper, as a pdf. You can also like our facebook page for breaking news and/or updates.

Thank you for letting us into your home each week, and we look forward to our 30th year of serving you.

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The Post travels to Maine


N-Post-Travels-to-Maine-Schumann

The Cedar Springs Post visited the Nubble Lighthouse in Cape Neddick, Maine, in mid August. Lori and Mark Schumann, of Cedar Springs, took the Post along when they visited friends there, north of Boston, Massachusetts.

Thanks, Mark and Lori, for taking us with you!

Are you going on vacation? Take the Post with you and snap some photos. Then send them to us with some info to news@cedarspringspost.com or mail them to Post travels, PO Box 370, Cedar Springs, MI 49319. We will be looking for yours!

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Want to win a newspaper?


POST-Building-Front-winterN-Post-raffleThe owner of The Cedar Springs Post, Lois Allen, has been publishing the “small town” newspaper with stories and information relevant to families in the northern Kent County area for over twenty years.

Starting publication in the late 1980s, Allen is hoping to get a well-deserved rest from the newspaper business. “I could use a vacation,” said Allen. “I haven’t had one in 25 years.”

She continued, “I set out to create the best local newspaper I could, and I think I’ve done that. The Post is great. I think it’s the perfect reflection of the community spirit here and I’m proud to be a part of it,” said Allen.

But now after decades of working to keep the struggling newspaper going, she is considering her options. “I’ve tried to get in contact with Warren Buffett to see if he’s interested in adding to his collection,” Allen explained. “I’d like to retire with about a million or so, but his people told me not to call back.” With no millionaires knocking down the door, Allen has even considered possibly closing The Post. She continued, “But then I thought, why not raffle it?”

According to Allen, the holder of the winning raffle ticket would “win” the newspaper. “Just think. You’d have your very own newspaper! You could put yourself on the front page every week. Or you could oust your neighbor for letting their dog crap in your yard. Think of the power you would hold!”

“You could say, ‘Stop the presses!’ every single day!” said Allen.

Readers or non-readers of The Post are eligible to enter and get their once in a lifetime chance at winning a real newspaper. And, as Allen says, there aren’t that many left. “They’re practically a collector’s item for the rich and famous.”

For just $10 a ticket, anyone can have a good shot at being a big shot in a small town. You could call Donald Trump and offer to “Do lunch.” And, unlike the lottery, the odds are very good at winning. Almost as good as hitting a pothole on your way to work.

Although the newspaper would be “free” to the winner, keeping it would not. According to Allen, the new publisher would be responsible for the operating funds needed to keep the weekly paper going once they took possession. She explained, “You’ll need money for stuff like, you know, rent, payroll, postage, printing five thousand copies weekly, the insurance, utilities, internet, office equipment, computer hardware and software, and stuff like that.”

“You might want to start with some serious operating cash,” she explained. “Or you can save a ton of money if you just do everything yourself.”

For a chance to enjoy ownership of a real newspaper and live the dream, that never, ever ends, look in The Post, April 1st issue for special details on, “I want to win a newspaper!”

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The Post travels to Beaver Creek, Colorado


N-POST-travels-to-ColoradoDuring a recent ski vacation to Beaver Creek, Colorado, Brenda (Rau) Rarick and family took the Post along to stay abreast of the happenings back in Michigan.

“I am a 1986 graduate of Cedar Springs High School and have stayed in touch with the local news through a subscription to The Cedar Springs Post, which my parents John and Jeanne Rau renew for me each year on my birthday,” explained Brenda, who now lives out of state.

In the photo, Brenda and her son Kyle Rarick pause during the Winterfest activities in Beaver Creek to catch up on some reading.

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Year in Review: Gone but not forgotten


Roger Allen

Roger Allen

Many of us lost loved ones in 2013. However, there was one death that touched us all at the Post. It was the death of Roger Allen—the founder of the Post and father of our current publisher, Lois Allen.

Roger Allen, of Rockford, Michigan, and formerly of Cedar Springs, died Saturday, January 5 after a long battle with heart disease. He was 84.

He was well known in both communities as publisher of the Rockford Squire newspaper and founder of The Cedar Springs Post. He wrote a weekly column for both papers, and many people appreciated Roger’s wit and humor. It was one of the most popular pages in the newspaper. If his column didn’t run for some reason, people called and wanted to know where it was.

He bought the Squire when it was the Rockford Weekly Register and in bankruptcy in the early 1980s. He felt that it was important that the town’s oldest business and only newspaper stay in publication.

He bought the Squire while living in Cedar Springs, and his neighbors complained and told him they wanted a newspaper in Cedar Springs, too. (The Clipper was no longer printing.) So he founded the Cedar Springs Post in 1988 and turned over the reins to his wife, Alice, and daughter, Lois. His daughter Beth runs the Squire.

Roger wrote his weekly columns without fail for over 30 years. When he traveled, he called the column Roger on the Road, and when he was in town he called the column Main Street. His column always featured jokes, anecdotes and his own wry commentary on world events. After a heart surgery several years ago, he was no longer able to travel. He bought property in Rockford, built a house and lived out his last days there.

 

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