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Tag Archive | "state record"

State record broken by same angler nearly nine years later


Roy Beasley of Madison Heights has the distinction of holding two state records for the same species of fish, first in 2008 and again in 2017. Here he is with his recent record-setting bigmouth buffalo catch from the River Raisin in Monroe County.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources recently confirmed a new state-record fish for bigmouth buffalo. This marks the first state-record fish caught in 2017—and it was caught by an angler who held the previous state record for bigmouth buffalo from 2008.

The new record fish was caught by Roy Beasley of Madison Heights, Michigan, in the River Raisin (Monroe County) Saturday, May 13, at 11 a.m. Beasley was bowfishing. The fish weighed 27 pounds and measured 35.25 inches.

The record was verified by Todd Wills, a DNR fisheries research manager on Lake St. Clair.

Beasley held the previous state-record bigmouth buffalo—this one caught on the Detroit River—from August 2008. That fish weighed 24.74 pounds and measured 34.50 inches.

“More and more people are enjoying the sport of bowfishing and recognizing the thrill it can offer those who pursue it,” said Sara Thomas, the DNR’s Lake Erie Management Unit manager. “The river system in Southeast Michigan offers ample opportunity to catch rather large fish. A huge congrats to Mr. Beasley for having broken this record twice.”

The DNR reminds anglers who bowfish to properly dispose of all specimens they harvest.

State records are recognized by weight only. To qualify for a state record, fish must exceed the current listed state record weight and identification must be verified by a DNR fisheries biologist.

To view a current list of Michigan state fish records, visit michigan.gov/staterecordfish.

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Smallmouth bass state record broken


 

Robert Bruce Kraemer of Treasure Island, Florida, recently set a new state-record catch for smallmouth bass with a fish he caught Sunday, Sept. 11, on Indian River in Cheboygan County. Kraemer owns a cottage in Indian River and spends most of the summer there.

Robert Bruce Kraemer of Treasure Island, Florida, recently set a new state-record catch for smallmouth bass with a fish he caught Sunday, Sept. 11, on Indian River in Cheboygan County. Kraemer owns a cottage in Indian River and spends most of the summer there.

Michigan’s existing state record for smallmouth bass was broken Sunday by Robert Bruce Kraemer of Treasure Island, Florida.

A longtime angler with a cottage in Indian River, Cheboygan County, Kraemer said he’s been fishing Michigan waters since 1965, but this is his first state-record catch. Using night crawlers for bait, Kraemer landed a 9.98-pound, 23.10-inch smallmouth bass while out on the Indian River.

“I usually spend June through the end of September up here at the cottage,” Kraemer said. “I’ve got some great fish stories and some nice fish, but nothing like this.”

The record was verified by Tim Cwalinski, a Michigan Department of Natural Resources fisheries biologist in Gaylord.

The previous state record for smallmouth bass was set in October 2015 when Greg Gasiciel of Rhodes, Michigan, landed a 9.33-pound, 24.50-inch fish from Hubbard Lake in Alcona County.

Prior to Gasiciel’s catch, the smallmouth bass state record had stood since 1906. That fish was a 9.25-pound, 27.25-inch fish from Long Lake in Cheboygan County.

“In just the last four years, anglers have caught a total of 16 state-record fish, a remarkable number of big fish in a relatively short time,” said Jim Dexter, chief of the DNR Fisheries Division. “This is just more evidence that Michigan is home to a healthy, robust fishery—a resource and sporting opportunity that continues to draw people from all over.”

Kraemer, the new smallmouth bass state record-holder, agreed.

“I keep coming back to Michigan for a lot of reasons,” he said. “The weather, the clear, cold water, good fishing…it’s just nice up here.”

Michigan fishing state records are recognized by weight only. To qualify for a state record, fish must exceed the current listed state-record weight and identification must be verified by a DNR fisheries biologist.

For more information on fishing in Michigan, including other state-record catches visit www.michigan.gov/fishing.

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Smallmouth bass state record broken 


 

Greg Gasiciel of Rhodes, Michigan, recently set a new state-record catch for smallmouth bass with a fish he caught Sunday on Hubbard Lake in Alcona County.

Greg Gasiciel of Rhodes, Michigan, recently set a new state-record catch for smallmouth bass with a fish he caught Sunday on Hubbard Lake in Alcona County.

Previous state record had stood since 1906

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources has confirmed a new state-record catch for smallmouth bass. This marks the sixth state-record fish caught so far in 2015.

The existing state record for smallmouth bass was broken Sunday, October 18, by Greg Gasiciel of Rhodes, Michigan. Gasiciel was bait-casting with a green grub when he landed a 9.33-pound, 24.50-inch smallmouth bass from Hubbard Lake in Alcona County.

The record was verified by Kathrin Schrouder, a DNR fisheries biologist in Bay City.

“This is additional evidence that Michigan truly has world-class bass fisheries,” said Jim Dexter, Department of Natural Resources Fisheries chief. “Smallmouth bass is one of the most popular, most sought-after sportfish in North America. Even though the Michigan state record stood for more than 100 years, we’re excited to see the bar set even higher for those who set out to land this iconic fish.”

The previous state record for smallmouth bass was set back in 1906 with a 9.25-pound, 27.25-inch fish taken from Long Lake in Cheboygan County. Records show this fish was caught by W.F. Shoemaker.

State records are recognized by weight only. To qualify for a state record, fish must exceed the current listed state-record weight and identification must be verified by a DNR fisheries biologist.

For more information on fishing in Michigan, including other state-record catches, visit michigan.gov/fishing.

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New state-record quillback 


Garrett Reid shows off the state-record quillback he bowfished on Hardy Dam Pond, besting the previous record by more than a quarter of a pound.

Garrett Reid shows off the state-record quillback he bowfished on Hardy Dam Pond, besting the previous record by more than a quarter of a pound.

Caught from same water body as 2014 record

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources recently confirmed another new state-record fish, this time a quillback carpsucker. This marks the fourth state-record fish caught in 2015.
The state record for quillback carpsucker was broken by a fish caught by Garrett Reid, of Nashville, Michigan, on Hardy Dam Pond, in Newaygo County Saturday, June 20, at 10 p.m. Reid was bowfishing. The fish weighed 8.52 pounds and measured 24 inches. The record was verified by Todd Grischke, a DNR fisheries biologist in Lansing.
The previous state-record quillback carpsucker was caught by Benjamin Frey, also on Hardy Dam Pond, Aug. 29, 2014. That fish weighed 8.25 pounds and measured 22.62 inches.
State records are recognized by weight only. To qualify for a state record, fish must exceed the current listed state-record weight and identification must be verified by a DNR fisheries biologist. To see a current list of Michigan’s state-record fish, visit michigan.gov/fishing.

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Middleville angler breaks freshwater drum state record 


This fish, caught on Gun Lake, by Mark Leep of Middleville, set a new state record for freshwater drum, weighing in at more than 28 pounds.

This fish, caught on Gun Lake, by Mark Leep of Middleville, set a new state record for freshwater drum, weighing in at more than 28 pounds.

The Department of Natural Resources confirmed a new state record last month for freshwater drum. This record marks the first one caught in 2015.

A fish caught by Mark Leep of Middleville, Michigan, on Gun Lake in Barry County Saturday, Jan. 24, at 4:30 p.m. beat the state record for freshwater drum. Leep was spearing. The fish weighed 28.61 pounds and measured 34.02 inches. Kregg Smith, a DNR fisheries biologist in Plainwell, verified the record.
James Black caught the previous state-record freshwater drum, weighing 26 pounds and measuring 37.5 inches, on Muskegon Lake May 28, 1973.

In Michigan, freshwater drum typically inhabit the Great Lakes or their tributaries. Based on the size of this fish, it found its way to Gun Lake several years ago, perhaps through illegal stocking, as there are limited connections to a large river system. Anglers are reminded that transferring fish from one water body to another is prohibited without an approved permit, because such transfers can disrupt the fish community in the receiving water through predation, competition with native species or introduction of new disease-causing organisms.

State records are recognized by weight only. To qualify for a state record, fish must exceed the current listed state-record weight, and a DNR fisheries biologist must verify identification.

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Second state-record fish caught this month


A white perch in Muskegon County

 

Aaron Slagh with his state-record white perch.

Aaron Slagh with his state-record white perch.

The Department of Natural Resources (DNR) confirmed the catch of a new state-record white perch on Friday, Jan. 24. This is the second state record caught in the month of January.

The white perch was caught by Aaron Slagh, of Holland, Mich., on Tuesday, Jan. 21, on Muskegon Lake in Muskegon County at 11 a.m. The fish weighed 1.93 pounds and measured 13.25 inches. Slagh was ice fishing with a spoon when he landed the record fish. The record was verified by Rich O’Neal, a DNR fisheries biologist, at the Muskegon field office.

The previous state-record white perch was caught by Kyle Ryan, of Reese, on Lake Huron, in Tuscola County, on July 13, 2002. That fish weighed 1.88 pounds and measured 13.25 inches.

“It was just another normal day on the ice for me, as I get out as much as I can,” said Slagh. “We were actually targeting yellow perch and I thought I had a walleye. When we pulled it up we thought ‘Holy cow—that’s a big white perch!’”

State records are recognized by weight only. To qualify for a state record, fish must exceed the current listed state-record weight and identification must be verified by a DNR fisheries biologist.

“This winter, despite the extreme weather most of Michigan has been experiencing, is shaping up to be a great time for many anglers,” said DNR Fisheries Division Chief Jim Dexter. “This latest state record once again showcases the quality of the state’s fisheries.”

For more information on fishing in Michigan, visit www.michigan.gov/fishing.

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Niles man catches new state record catfish


Rodney Akey with his record-setting catch. Photo courtesy of the Michigan DNR.

Breaks Michigan record set in 1943

The Department of Natural Resources confirmed the catch of a new state record flathead catfish. Rodney Akey of Niles, Mich., caught the fish on Tuesday, May 22, on the St. Joseph River in Berrien County at 8 p.m. It weighed 49.8 pounds and measured 45.7 inches. Akey was still-fishing from shore with an alewife when he landed the record fish. The record was verified by Scott Hanshue, a DNR fisheries biologist, at the DNR’s Plainwell office. The previous state record flathead catfish was caught by Elmer Rayner, of Hastings, Mich., on the Maple River in Ionia County on Aug. 6, 1943. That fish weighed in at 47.5 pounds and measured 44 inches.

“I’ve been fishing catfish on the St. Joseph River for the last 20 years, but it never crossed my mind that I would catch a state record,” said Akey. “And beating a nearly 70-year record—that’s a feat in itself!”

State records are recognized by weight only. To qualify for a state record, fish must exceed the current listed state record weight and identification must be verified by a DNR fisheries biologist. For more information about record-breaking fish caught in Michigan, visit www.michigan.gov/masterangler.

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