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Tag Archive | "SSI"

Social Security questions and answers

Vonda VanTil

Vonda VanTil

By: Vonda VanTil, Social Security Public Affairs Specialist

Question: I am very happy that I was just approved to receive disability benefits. How long will it be before I get my first payment?

Answer: If you’re eligible for Social Security disability benefits, there is a five-month waiting period before your benefits begin. We’ll pay your first benefit for the sixth full month after the date we find your disability began. For example, if your disability began on June 15, 2015, your first benefit would be paid for the month of December 2015, the sixth full month of disability, and you would receive your first benefit payment in January 2016. You can read more about the disability benefits approval process at www.socialsecurity.gov/dibplan/dapproval.htm.

Question: I’m applying for disability benefits, and I read about “substantial gainful activity.” What is that?

Answer: The term “substantial gainful activity,” or SGA, is used to describe a level of work activity and earnings. Work is “substantial” if it involves doing significant physical or mental activities or a combination of both. If you are working and earn more than a certain amount, we generally consider that you are engaging in substantial gainful activity. In this case, you wouldn’t be eligible for disability benefits. You can read more about how we define substantial gainful activity at www.socialsecurity.gov/OACT/COLA/sga.html.

Question: My father gets Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for a disability. He is now legally blind and wants to receive information from Social Security in an alternative format. How do I help him?

Answer: Social Security is dedicated to providing vital information in the most effective way for every recipient. There are several ways to receive information from us if you’re blind or have a visual impairment. You can choose to receive Braille notices and a standard print notice by first-class mail; a Microsoft Word file on a data compact disc (CD) and a print standard notice by first-class mail; an audio CD and a standard print notice by first-class mail; or a large print (18-point size) notice and a standard print notice by first-class mail. You can request these special notice options by visiting www.socialsecurity.gov/people/blind.

Question: My mother receives Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. She’ll be going to live with my sister next month. Does she have to report the move to Social Security?

Answer: Yes, she should report any change in living arrangements to us within 10 days. The change could affect her payment. Failure to report the change could result in an incorrect SSI payment that may have to be paid back. Also, we need her correct address so we can send her important correspondence about her SSI benefits. She can easily change her address by accessing her personal my Social Security account at www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount. She can also call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778).

Question: I recently retired and am approaching the age when I can start receiving Medicare. What is the monthly premium for Medicare Part B?

Answer: The standard Medicare Part B premium for medical insurance is currently $104.90 per month. Since 2007, some people with higher incomes must pay a higher monthly premium for their Medicare coverage. You can get details at www.medicare.gov or by calling 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227) (TTY 1-877-486-2048).

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Social Security questions and answers

By: Vonda VanTil, Social Security Public Affairs Specialist

Question: How does Social Security decide if I am disabled?

Answer: For an adult to be considered disabled, Social Security must determine that you are unable to do the work you did before and, based on your age, education, and work experience, you are unable to adjust to any other work that exists in significant numbers in the national economy. Also, your disability must last or be expected to last for at least one year or to result in death. Social Security pays only for total disability. No benefits are payable for partial disability or short-term disability (less than a year).

Question: What is the earliest age that I can receive Social Security disability benefits?

Answer: There is no minimum age as long as you meet the Social Security definition of disabled and you have sufficient work to qualify. To qualify for disability benefits, you must have worked long enough under Social Security to earn the required number of work credits and some of the work must be recent. You can earn up to a maximum of four work credits each year. The amount of earnings required for a credit increases each year as general wage levels go up, and is currently $1,120. The number of work credits you need for disability benefits depends on your age when you become disabled. For example, if you are under age 24, you may qualify with as little as six credits of coverage. But people disabled at age 31 or older generally need between 20 and 40 credits, and some of the work must have been recent. For example, you may need to have worked five out of the past 10 years. Learn more at www.socialsecurity.gov/disability.

Question: What is the purpose of Supplemental Security Income, or SSI?

Answer: SSI is designed to help aged, blind, and disabled people who have little income and few resources. It provides financial assistance to meet basic needs for food, clothing, and shelter. You can receive SSI even if you have not worked and paid into Social Security. SSI is a Federal income supplement program funded by general tax revenues (not Social Security taxes). Find out more at www.socialsecurity.gov/ssi/.

Question: My brother recently left me some money. Will this inheritance affect my SSI benefits?

Answer: We consider the money inherited from your brother income for the month you receive it. That could make you ineligible for SSI that month, depending on the amount of the inheritance. If you keep the money into the next month, it becomes a part of your resources. You cannot have more than $2,000 in resources to remain eligible for SSI. You should call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 and report the inheritance. Representatives can tell you how your eligibility might be affected.

Question: Who is eligible for extra help with Medicare prescription drug costs?

Answer: Medicare beneficiaries with limited income and resources may qualify for extra help. The extra help can save them money. It pays part of the monthly premiums, annual deductibles, and prescription co-payments under the new Medicare prescription drug program. The extra help is estimated to be worth an average of $4,000 per year. Help someone qualify and apply at www.socialsecurity.gov/prescriptionhelp.

Vonda VanTil is the public affairs specialist for West Michigan.  You can write her c/o Social Security Administration, 3045 Knapp St NE, Grand Rapids MI 49525 or via email at vonda.vantil@ssa.gov

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