web analytics

Tag Archive | "Social Security"

Social Security questions and answers


By: Vonda VanTil, Social Security Public Affairs Specialist

Question: When a person who has worked and paid Social Security taxes dies, who is eligible for survivors benefits?
Answer: Social Security survivors benefits can be paid to:
•    Widows or widowers — full benefits at full retirement age, or reduced benefits as early as age 60;
•    Disabled widows or widowers — as early as age 50;
•    Widows or widowers at any age if they take care of the deceased’s child who is under age 16 or disabled and receiving Social Security benefits;
•    Unmarried children under 18, or up to age 19 if they are attending high school full time. Under certain circumstances, benefits can be paid to stepchildren, grandchildren, or adopted children; and
•    Children at any age who were disabled before age 22 and remain disabled
Even if you are divorced, you still may qualify for survivors benefits based on the earnings record of a former spouse. For more information, go to www.socialsecurity.gov.
Question: What is a Social Security “credit?”
Answer: During your working years, earnings covered by Social Security are posted to your record. You earn Social Security credits based on those earnings. The amount of earnings needed for one credit rises as average earnings levels rise. In 2011, you receive one credit for each $1,120 of earnings. You can earn up to a maximum of four credits a year. Most people will need a minimum of 40 credits (or 10 years of work) to be eligible for retirement benefits.
Question: What’s so easy about applying online for benefits?
Answer: There’s no need to go to a local Social Security office or wait for an appointment with a Social Security representative.You can apply in less than 15 minutes. Just visit www.socialsecurity.gov. Once you submit your electronic application, you are done. In most cases, there are no forms to sign or documents to mail. Try it at www.socialsecurity.gov.
Question: What is the earliest age that I can begin receiving retirement benefits?
Answer: You can get a reduced benefit as early as age 62. Keep in mind that your monthly benefit amount would be about 33 percent higher if you wait until age 66 and nearly 80 percent higher if you defer payments until age 70. Visit our Retirement Estimator to find out how much you can expect to receive. You can find it at www.socialsecurity.gov/estimator.
Vonda VanTil is the public affairs specialist for West Michigan.  You can write her c/o Social Security Administration, 3045 Knapp St NE, Grand Rapids MI 49525 or via email at vonda.vantil@ssa.gov

Posted in Social Security News, Voices and ViewsComments Off

Payroll tax cut to boost take-home pay


New withholding details now available

WASHINGTON ―The Internal Revenue Service released instructions earlier this month to help employers implement the 2011 cut in payroll taxes, along with new income-tax withholding tables that employers will use during 2011.
Millions of workers will see their take-home pay rise during 2011 because the Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization, and Job Creation Act Of 2010 provides a two percentage point payroll tax cut for employees, reducing their Social Security tax withholding rate from 6.2 percent to 4.2 percent of wages paid. This reduced Social Security withholding will have no effect on the employee’s future Social Security benefits.
The new law also maintains the income-tax rates that have been in effect in recent years.
Employers should start using the new withholding tables and reducing the amount of Social Security tax withheld as soon as possible in 2011 but not later than Jan. 31, 2011. Notice 1036, released today, contains the percentage method income tax withholding tables, the lower Social Security withholding rate, and related information that most employers need to implement these changes. Publication 15, (Circular E), Employer’s Tax Guide, containing the extensive wage bracket tables that some employers use, will be available on IRS.gov in a few days.
The IRS recognizes that the late enactment of these changes makes it difficult for many employers to quickly update their withholding systems. For that reason, the agency asks employers to adjust their payroll systems as soon as possible, but not later than Jan. 31, 2011.
For any Social Security tax over withheld during January, employers should make an offsetting adjustment in workers’ pay as soon as possible but not later than March 31, 2011.
Employers and payroll companies will handle the withholding changes, so workers typically won’t need to take any additional action, such as filling out a new W-4 withholding form.
As always, however, the IRS urges workers to review their withholding every year and, if necessary, fill out a new W-4 and give it to their employer. For example, individuals and couples with multiple jobs, people who are having children, getting married, getting divorced or buying a home, and those who typically wind up with a balance due or large refund at the end of the year may want to consider submitting revised W-4 forms. Publication 919, How Do I Adjust My Tax Withholding? provides more information to workers on making changes to their tax withholding.

Posted in Tax TimeComments Off

Social Security News


Baby Boomers: apply online for Medicare

By: Vonda VanTil, Social Security Public Affairs Specialist

This January marks a historic moment: our Nation’s first baby boomers are turning 65.
For many baby boomers, it is time to hit the computer.  Even if you have decided to wait until after you are age 65 to apply for retirement benefits, most people should start getting Medicare coverage at age 65.
If you would like to begin your Medicare coverage when you first become eligible, it’s important that you apply within three months of reaching age 65. Don’t worry about the time and effort it will take to apply for Medicare — it’s fast and easy! You can do it online at www.socialsecurity.gov/medicareonly in as little as 10 minutes.
Why apply online for Medicare? Because it’s fast, easy, and secure. You don’t need an appointment and you can avoid waiting in traffic or in line.  As long as you have ten minutes to spare, you have time to complete and submit your online Medicare application.
People who started receiving Social Security retirement or disability benefits before age 65 do not need to apply; they will be automatically enrolled in Medicare.
To learn more about Medicare benefits, visit www.Medicare.gov.
To learn more about Medicare and the online application, visit www.socialsecurity.gov/medicareonly.  While you’re there, take a look at the Patty Duke Show reunion video as they talk about turkey, pie, and Medicare online.
Happy birthday to all the baby boomers turning 65 in 2011!
Vonda VanTil is the public affairs specialist for West Michigan.  You can write her c/o Social Security Administration, 50 College SE, Grand Rapids MI 49503 or via email at vonda.vantil@ssa.gov

Posted in BusinessComments (2)