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Tag Archive | "Salmonella"

Trader Joe’s Raw cashew pieces recalled


N-raw-cashew-recall1If you’ve bought raw cashew pieces at Trader Joe’s, you will want to pay attention to this recall.

Heritage International (USA) Inc. of Compton, Calif., is voluntarily recalling one lot of Trader Joe’s Raw Cashew Pieces with the following code “BEST BEFORE 07.17.2016TF4” because of potential contamination with Salmonella. Salmonella is an organism that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

The front and back of the Trader Joe's Raw Cashew Pieces which have been recalled. The photo above show the lot code location.

The front and back of the Trader Joe’s Raw Cashew Pieces which have been recalled. The photo above show the lot code location.

The recall only affects one specific lot of Trader Joe’s Raw Cashew Pieces. The product comes in a 16 ounce, clear, non-resealable plastic package (with a barcode number of 00505154) and with the following lot code, “BEST BEFORE 07.17.2016TF4.” The “BEST BEFORE” information can be found on the backside of the package above the barcode.

The product was distributed only to Trader Joe’s stores in Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, Washington D.C. and Wisconsin.

No illnesses have been reported to date.

The voluntary recall was initiated by Heritage International (USA) Inc., after routine testing by an FDA contract laboratory revealed the presence of Salmonella in one lot of Raw Cashew Pieces. Other lots tested by the FDA contract laboratory and further testing of this lot by Trader Joe’s resulted in no additional findings of contamination.

Customers who have purchased the specified lot code (BEST BEFORE 07.17.2016TF4) of Raw Cashew Pieces are urged not to eat the product, and to dispose of it or return it to any Trader Joe’s for a full refund. Customers may call Trader Joe’s Customer Relations at (626) 599-3817 6:00AM-6:00PM PST, Monday-Friday, with any questions.

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Dole recalls some spinach


N-Spinach-recall

Dole Fresh Vegetables is voluntarily recalling a limited number of cases of bagged salad. The product being recalled is Dole Spinach coded A27409B & A27409A, with an Enjoy By date of October 15 and UPC 7143000976 due to a possible health risk from Salmonella. Dole Fresh Vegetables is coordinating closely with regulatory officials. No illnesses have been reported in association with the recall.

The product code and Enjoy By date are in the upper right-hand corner of the package; the UPC code is on the back of the package, below the barcode. The salads were distributed in 13 U.S. states (Connecticut, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Wisconsin).

No illnesses have been reported in association with the recall. This precautionary recall notification is being issued due to an isolated instance in which a sample of Dole Spinach salad yielded a positive result for Salmonella in a random sample test conducted by the Michigan Department of Agriculture & Rural Development; Laboratory Division.

Neither Baby Spinach nor any other salads, are included in the recall. Only the specific Product Codes, UPC codes and October 15, 2015 Enjoy By date identified above are included in the recall. Consumers who have any remaining product with these Product Codes should not consume it, but rather discard it. Retailers and consumers with questions may call the Dole Food Company Consumer Response Center at (800) 356-3111, which is open 8:00 am to 3:00 pm (PT) Monday – Friday.

Dole Fresh Vegetables customer service representatives are already contacting retailers and are in the process of confirming that the recalled product is being removed from the stream of commerce.

Salmonella is an organism that can cause foodborne illness in a person who eats a food item contaminated with it. Symptoms of infection may include fever and gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, diarrhea, vomiting or abnormal pain. The illness primarily impacts young children, frail and elderly people and those with weakened immune systems. Most healthy adults and children rarely become seriously ill.

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Parents: spring chicks may carry Salmonella


 

From the Michigan Dept. of Agriculture

Health officials at the Michigan Departments of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) and Community Health (MDCH) are warning parents that baby poultry may carry Salmonella, a common bacteria found in the droppings of poultry, which can cause illness in people.
“Raising birds can be a great experience, but children need to be supervised and wash their hands after handling chicks and other poultry,” said MDARD State Veterinarian Dr. James Averill. “Even birds appearing healthy can carry bacteria which can make people sick.”

“Live poultry, especially baby poultry, can carry Salmonella germs, so it’s important to not keep them in the house and to wash your hands immediately after touching poultry or anything in the area where they live or roam,” said Dr. Matthew Davis, MDCH Chief Medical Executive. “Treating poultry like you would a pet increases the risk for Salmonella infection in a household.”

Salmonella can make people sick with diarrhea, vomiting, fever and/or abdominal cramps lasting 4-7 days or more.

People should always assume baby chicks carry Salmonella and should follow these recommendations to protect themselves and others:
1. Children younger than five-years-of-age, older adults, or people with weak immune systems should not handle or touch chicks, ducklings, or other live poultry because they are more likely to become severely ill.

2. Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water after touching live poultry or anything in the area where they live and roam. Adults should supervise hand washing for young children.

3. Use hand sanitizer until you can wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water.

4. Chicks should have a heat lamp and should be kept in a barn or garage, in a draft-free cage that keeps predators out.

5. Always keep poultry away from areas where food or drink is prepared, served, or stored, such as kitchens, or outdoor patios.

6. Do not kiss the chicks

7. Do not touch your mouth, smoke, eat, or drink after handling live poultry.

8. Clean all equipment such as cages, feed, water containers and other materials associated with raising or caring for live poultry outside the house.

For more information, visit: http://www.cdc.gov/features/salmonellababybirds/

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Consumer Advisory: Serrano peppers May be contaminated with Salmonella


This photo shows unripe serrano peppers. They can be varying shades of green, red, orange or brown upon maturity.

This photo shows unripe serrano peppers. They can be varying shades of green, red, orange or brown upon maturity.

If you bought serrano peppers from Meijer last week, you will want to return them.

The Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) issued a consumer advisory on Wednesday, October 22, for serrano peppers supplied by Bailey Farms Inc. of Oxford, North Carolina and distributed by Meijer stores in Michigan because they have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella. No illnesses have been reported to date.

These serrano peppers were sold in Meijer stores from October 14 to October 19, 2014. Serrano pepper was shipped on Bailey Farms labeled boxes with a 3×4 barcode label on the outside of the box containing the lot code 33714 and 1460410.

A random sample was taken by MDARD on Oct 13, 2014; and the sample tested by MDARD’s Lab Division confirmed it positive for Salmonella on October 18.

Consumers who have purchased serrano peppers during said dates are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund.

Salmonella is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditic and arthritis.

Consumers who have recently eaten raw serrano peppers or foods containing raw serrano peppers and are experiencing any of these symptoms should contact their health care provider. All Salmonella infections should be reported to state or local health authorities.

 

 

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Parents: spring chicks may carry Salmonella


HEA-Spring-chicks

Health officials at the Michigan Departments of Agriculture and Rural Development and Community Health warn parents that the baby poultry found in feed and pet stores in the spring may carry Salmonella, a common bacterial illness found in the droppings of poultry that can cause illness in people.

“Raising birds can be a great experience, but children need to be supervised and wash their hands after handling chicks and other poultry,” said State Veterinarian Dr. James Averill. “Even birds that appear healthy can carry bacteria that will make people sick.”

“Live poultry, especially baby poultry, can carry Salmonella germs, so it’s important to not keep them in the house and to wash your hands immediately after touching poultry or anything in the area where they live or roam,” said Dr. Matthew Davis, Chief Medical Executive with the Michigan Department of Community Health. “Treating poultry like you would a pet increases the risk for Salmonella infection in a household.”

Salmonella can make people sick with diarrhea, vomiting, fever and/or abdominal cramps lasting 4-7 days or more. People should always assume baby chicks carry Salmonella and should follow these recommendations to protect themselves and others:

Children younger than five-years-of-age, older adults, or people with weak immune systems should not handle or touch chicks, ducklings, or other live poultry because they are more likely to become severely ill.

Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water after touching live poultry or anything in the area where they live and roam. Adults should supervise hand washing for young children.

Use hand sanitizer until you can wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water.

Chicks should have a heat lamp and should be kept in a barn or garage, in a draft-free cage that keeps predators out.

Always keep poultry away from areas where food or drink is prepared, served, or stored, such as kitchens, or outdoor patios.

Do not kiss the chicks.

Do not touch your mouth, smoke, eat, or drink after handling live poultry.

Clean all equipment such as cages, feed, water containers and other materials associated with raising or caring for live poultry outside the house.

For more information, visit: http://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/live-poultry-04-13/advice-consumers.html

 

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