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Tag Archive | "referee"

Be the Referee


 

By Mark Uyl, Asst. Director, MHSAA

Be the Referee is a weekly message from the Michigan High School Athletics Association that is designed to help educate people on the rules in different sports, to help them better understand the art of officiating, and to recruit officials.

Clipping in the free-blocking zone

Most of the recent rules changes in high school football have all dealt with increasing player safety.  The most significant change for the 2016 season focuses on safety, especially for offensive and defensive linemen.

For many years, the Free Blocking Zone, that area between the two offensive tackles, was an area where two types of blocks that are illegal on other parts of the field—blocks below the waist and clipping—were legal if it was done by linemen, initially at the start of the play.

For this season, clipping is now an illegal block, even in the Free Blocking Zone; while blocks below the waist continue to be legal from in front.

 

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Be the referee


 

By Mark Uyl, Asst. Director, MHSAA

Be the Referee is a weekly message from the Michigan High School Athletics Association that is designed to help educate people on the rules in different sports, to help them better understand the art of officiating, and to recruit officials.

Automatic first downs

Today we are going to talk about one of the biggest rule difference areas in high school football from those rules used in college and pro games and that deals with automatic first downs.

When watching that college game on Saturday or the pro game on Sunday, all of us know there are several defensive fouls that give the offense an automatic first down. However, under high school rules, the opposite is true most of the time.

The only high school fouls that result in an automatic first down for the offense are the roughing fouls – roughing the passer, the kicker, the holder and the long snapper. Fouls such as defensive pass interference or any other personal foul do not bring an automatic first down under high school rules.

Posted in SportsComments (0)

Be the referee


 

By Mark Uyl, Asst. Director, MHSAA

 

Automatic first downs 

 

Today we are going to talk about one of the biggest rule difference areas in high school football, from those rules used in college and pro games, and that deals with automatic first downs.

When watching that college game on Saturday or the pro game on Sunday, all of us know there are several defensive fouls that give the offense an automatic first down. However, under high school rules, the opposite is true most of the time.

The only high school fouls that result in an automatic first down for the offense are the roughing fouls—roughing the passer, the kicker, the holder and the long snapper. Fouls such as defensive pass interference or any other personal foul do not bring an automatic first down under high school rules.

Be the Referee is a weekly message from the Michigan High School Athletics Association that is designed to help educate people on the rules in different sports, to help them better understand the art of officiating, and to recruit officials.

 

Posted in SportsComments (0)

Be the referee


 

By Mark Uyl, Asst. Director, MHSAA

 

Be the Referee is a weekly message from the Michigan High School Athletics Association that is designed to help educate people on the rules in different sports, to help them better understand the art of officiating, and to recruit officials.

Tackle Box 

Today we are going to talk about the rules that govern the quarterback, specifically when the quarterback is being rushed and is looking to throw the ball away and avoid the sack.

Under both pro and college rules, they have what’s called the tackle box. When the quarterback gets outside of the original position of the offensive tackles and throws the ball and it reaches the original line of scrimmage, there is never a foul for intentional grounding. However, under high school rules there is no such thing as a tackle box.

If the quarterback is either in pocket or scrambles outside of the pocket and now is trying to throw that ball away to avoid the sack, there always must be a receiver in the vicinity of the pass to avoid an intentional grounding foul.

 

Posted in SportsComments (0)

Be the referee


 

By Mark Uyl, Asst. Director, MHSAA

Be the Referee is a weekly message from the Michigan High School Athletics Association that is designed to help educate people on the rules in different sports, to help them better understand the art of officiating, and to recruit officials.

Pass Interference 

Today we’re going to talk about one of the most difficult calls for any football official—pass interference. It’s important to know that whenever a forward pass is thrown beyond the line of scrimmage that both players—the offensive receiver as well as the defender—each have an equal right to make a play on the football.

Now, not all contact will automatically result in a pass interference foul. The official must judge if that early contact before the ball arrives has placed one of the two players at a distinct disadvantage. When that contact does create the disadvantage, you have a foul for pass interference. When the contact is minimal and is simply incidental, no foul has occurred.

Asst. Director Mark Uyl oversees the MHSAA’s officiating efforts, and is an accomplished collegiate official in two sports. He also umpired the NCAA College World Series in 2014.

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