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Tag Archive | "Reed"

The Post goes to Ireland


N-Post-goes-to-Ireland1

N-Post-goes-to-Ireland2Rachel (Reed) Hunt and her husband Josh recently traveled across the Republic of Ireland and took the Post with them on their adventure in the Emerald Isle.  The couple flew into Dublin, and traveled cross country to visit many historic sites, including the ruins of medieval castles, the Cliffs of Moher, and they even kissed the Blarney Stone! (Which is no small feat since you have to do it upside down.) Rachel said driving on their narrow roads without shoulders was one of the hardest things to get used to. And it was especially tricky driving through the Gap of Dunloe, a narrow winding mountain pass, with only room enough for one vehicle on the road. But the two had a great time, and we thank you for taking us with you to Ireland!

N-Post-goes-to-Ireland3If readers are going on vacation, take a copy of the Post with you, snap a photo, and send it to us with some brief information to news@cedarspringspost.com. 

 

 

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Catch of the Week


OUT-Catch-Hannah-ReedOUT-Catch-Zachary-ReedHannah Reed, 6, and Zachary Reed, 6, of Cedar Springs, were fishing at their grandma and grandpa’s cottage at Bass Lake, in Gowen, on Monday, May 27, when they caught these beauties. Hannah and Zachary are the children of David and Kerri Reed, and attend Cedar Trails Elementary.

Way to go, Hannah and Zachary!  You made the Post Catch of the Week!

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Joan C. Reed


August 7, 1931—May 13, 2004

 

Happy Mother’s Day!

We love and miss you mom!

 

Love your family

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Connecting across the miles


CS grad on mission with Jamaican deaf school

 

Rachel Hunt (left center), her husband, Josh (right center), and other members of the Jamaica mission team and friends.

By Judy Reed

Rachel (Reed) Hunt loves kids and they love her, too. And now, for the fourth time, the 2003 graduate of Cedar Springs High School has taken that love, along with a team of Cornerstone University students, and shared that love with deaf children in Jamaica.
Hunt graduated from Cornerstone University in 2008 with a BA in Accounting, and with an MBA in 2011. She is also staff accountant at the university.
She was in her senior year (2008) at Cornerstone when she heard there was a mission trip forming for Jamaica, in conjunction with Jamaica Link Ministries, based in Grand Rapids. She joined the team and handled their finances on the trip. The small mission team stayed at Fairhaven Ministries, and worked at the Jamaica Christian School for the Deaf for 10 days, redoing their library. “We stripped it down, catalogued books, set them up by genre, set up the computer and scanners, made it like a real library,” recalled Rachel. They also played with the kids at the school during downtime, did devotions at public schools, and visited an orphanage for the severely disabled.

Team members help mix cement for addition.

After the first trip, she was hooked. In 2009 she went with a team to Mexico, but in 2010 she co-led the next trip to Jamaica, and then headed up the trips in May 2011 and January 2012. Each time they’ve worked with the Jamaica School for the Deaf and Robin’s Nest orphanage.
Rachel said the goal was to foster a relationship and build connections with the children and people there. “A lot of teams go to the school for a day and then are gone,” she explained. “So when a team comes and stays, they get very excited. Some of the kids recognized me as soon as I got there,” she said of her most recent trip.
In 2010, Rachel and the team helped with construction on the school’s kindergarten building, by filling in the foundation, and mixing and pouring cement for the ceiling. Last spring they bought windows for the entire kindergarten building and helped with painting. On the most recent trip, they helped with the addition of a second floor to the kindergarten building by mixing and filling cinder blocks with cement. “We helped them get ready for the bigger teams that will be going there this summer,” she said.

Josh Hunt holds a sleeping Jamaican child.

The teams from Cornerstone are usually small—only 5-11 people. But the smaller size helps the relationship be more intimate. And that growing relationship is what Rachel likes best about the trips. “We have been able to make such an impact on the people in such a consistent way. Our picture from two years ago is still up on their file cabinet (at the JCSD). It’s a special connection.”
While the team sees some change in members from year to year, one special addition to the team this year was Rachel’s new husband, Josh. The two got to work together, and he got to see firsthand what she loves about the place. “Josh was the muscle of the team,” she said with a laugh. “But really, I liked showing him a place that was like a second home.”
It was Josh’s first mission trip. “I liked that it was an opportunity to connect with another culture, and that we were invited to work and help them,” said Josh. He also expressed an interest in going back.
The group did have some down time. After working they played with the children, and had their own bonding times as a group in the evening, playing cards, board games, uploading their daily blog, and sometimes swimming in the ocean, which was right across the street. They also saw some of the sights and visited the marketplace.
Rachel said one of the neatest things is to see what some of the students that were on the team in the past are now doing because of their experience. “We had one guy lead a trip from his church to Jamaica, and a girl who went on the trip in the spring and this month is going back to Jamaica this summer to live and help out at the Jamaica Christian School for the Deaf. Another went on the trip to see if she liked being out of the country, and then went to Korea for a semester to study. For those who think they might want to be a missionary, it’s a good way to see what it’s like,” she said.
Rachel said that her goal is to continue the trips, and build on the relationships they’ve established with the people. But she’s confident that can continue with others, if for some reason she can’t go in the future. She said the trips are sometimes open to others, and if other organizations are interested, they can also contact Jamaica Link at www.jamaicalink.org to set up their own trip.
For more info on Jamaica Christian School for the Deaf, visit www.jcsdeaf.org, and for Cornerstone University, visit www.cornerstone.edu.

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Richard M. Reed


In loving memory
Richard M. Reed
October 9, 1933-January 4, 2004

Not how did he die, but how did he live?
Not what did he gain, but what did he give?
These are the units to measure the worth
Of a man as a man, regardless of birth.
Not, what was his church, nor what was his creed?
But had he befriended those really in need?
Was he ever ready, with word of good cheer,
To bring back a smile, to banish a tear?
Not what did the sketch in the newspaper say,
But how many were sorry when he passed away?

It’s been eight years, but we still miss you and think of you everyday.
Love, your family

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The greatest among you


Pastor Kevin Reed
Grace Evangelical Free Church
4714 13 Mile Road, Rockford

“…Instead, whoever wants to become great among you must be your servant… …Just as the son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many” Matthew 20:26,28 (NIV).
There is an old song that we used to sing in Sunday school, and the words went something like this, “If you wanna be great in God’s kingdom, you gotta be a servant of all…” It is a catchy tune and still all these years later I remember it.  But lately I have been asking myself the question, “Do I believe it?” It is easy to sing about being a servant, it is harder to become one. It’s easy to quote the Bible verses where Jesus tells us to be a servant, but it’s harder to live them. It’s easy to praise Jesus for his selfless act of becoming a servant as mentioned in Philippians 2:5-11 (take the time to read it), but it’s harder to follow his example as we are commanded to in the beginning of that passage.
To serve others is a great idea, and we all believe it needs to be done, but at the core of our being we would much rather be served than serve, and therein lies the dilemma. Our society tells us to do what makes us feel good, well that is to let others serve us, while our Savior tells us to do that which goes against everything we feel, and that is to forego our perceived “right” to be served and use our lives to serve others. As Children of the Most High, this is a crossroads that we are faced with everyday. Whom are we going to follow? Whom are we going to listen to today? After all, being a “servant” seems so dirty, so low, so unamazing. Why would anyone want to voluntarily do that?
I would like to encourage you today that in becoming a servant we have the privilege of showing other people Jesus, and shouldn’t that be our number one goal as children of God? You see, it was Jesus who came to this earth and deserved the “red-carpet” treatment. He deserved to be worshiped, but the Bible tells us that he chose to serve rather than be served. There are enough people (Christians and nonChristians alike) in this world who want to be served, but there are few true servants who have realized that only in serving others do I have the privilege of showing them the greatest servant of all, Jesus.  And friends, may I propose to you that the world needs to start seeing less of God’s children and more of Jesus! The only way we can accomplish this is by being a servant, because only in becoming a servant can we reflect to this world our Savior! Think about it—who can you show Jesus to today?

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Hunt—Reed


Steve and Judy Reed, of Cedar Springs, and David and Julie Hunt, of Plainwell, are happy to announce the marriage of their children, Rachel Anne Reed and Joshua David Hunt.
The couple was married at Johnson Park, in Grandville, Michigan, on September 16, with Reverend Charles Smith officiating.
Attendants of the bride were Mike Nowak (friend), Erin Greenhoe (friend) and Jessica Prater (sister of the bride).
Attendants of the groom were Levi Hunt (brother of the groom) and Steven Reed (brother of the bride).
Ringbearer was Landon Prater, nephew of the bride.
The reception followed at the enclosed shelter in Johnson Park, and the couple honeymooned in Cancun. They live in Grand Rapids.
Rachel is a 2003 graduate of Cedar Springs High School, and 2008 & 2011 graduate of Cornerstone University (BA, MBA). She is staff accountant at Cornerstone University. Josh is a 2003 graduate of Delton Kellogg High School and 2008 graduate of Kalamazoo Valley Community College. He is employed by Meijer.
Proud grandparents of the couple are Bill and Pat Campbell, of Big Rapids, and Les and Jean Green, of Plainwell.

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Could anyone use some comfort?


By Kevin Reed, Senior Pastor
Grace Evangelical Free Church
4714 13 Mile Rd, Rockford

2 Corinthians 1:3,4a; 7:6 – “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our affliction… …But God, who comforts the downcast…”
Life is tough! That’s probably the understatement of the century. Everywhere we go we run into people who are hurting, people who are depressed, people who are downcast, people who are having a tough time with life. You know, that may even describe how you feel. I know in my life there are times where I just feel downcast.  It may be a physical struggle, an emotional struggle, a relationship struggle, a financial struggle, or maybe even a sin struggle. But, regardless of what the struggle, we are left feeling just flat out downcast. We may wonder why we continue to fight the battle, we may wonder if there is any victory for the battle, and then there are times where we may just wonder if it’s even worth it.  What do you do when you feel like this? What do you do for those you love in your life who are feeling like this?
I may not have all the answers for a lot of life’s tough questions like this one, but I do know the God who has all the answers.  The Bible tells us in 2 Corinthians that Almighty God comforts those who are downcast, and Scripture even goes as far to testify that God is the God of ALL COMFORT!!  The Greek word used in these verses for comfort literally means “to call near”.  My friends, at the times when we are feeling the lowest, at the times when we are feeling like no one understands and no one cares, God does.  As a matter of fact it is at those times when we are downcast that God is inviting us to come near.  He is opening His arms and inviting us to come find comfort and shelter in His embrace.  The cares of this world that once seemed so big are suddenly drowned out by the embrace of our Heavenly Father.  As He hugs us and holds us it is as if there is not a care in the world that could ruin that moment.  We find in Him all the comfort and strength we need to deal with the “tough stuff” that life throws our way.  There is no situation He is not in control of and there is no person who is downcast whom He cannot and will not comfort!  He truly is the God of all comfort and He is calling all the downcast to come near and rest in His arms.
Where do you run when you find yourself downcast? Do you try and fight the struggle on your own, or do you take shelter in the arms of the Almighty? Where do you point people who are downcast? Are you always trying to find the right word to encourage them, or the perfect piece of advice for them? Don’t! Simply point them to the One who is calling them into His embrace. Could anyone use some comfort? The arms of God are wide open, let us find ourselves lost in His embrace, and let’s leave the struggles to Him.

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A Phoenix Rises from the Ashes


Howard Christensen Nature Center takes steps to reopen

Ranger Steve Mueller leads a group on a nature walk at Howard Christensen Nature Center in this Post file photo.

By Tom Noreen

A group of about 30 people gathered at the Tyrone Township Hall on March 3 to learn about the progress made in reopening the Howard Christensen Nature Center (HCNC), 16160 Red Pine Dr, in Kent City, as its own nonprofit 501(c)3 organization. The center closed in January due to a funding shortage.

Cindy Perski, with the assistance of Kathy Reed (former director under the Kent Conservation District) has taken the lead at creating the umbrella organization that would oversee the center. Perski recently retired as CEO of a manufacturing company in Southwest Michigan. After retirement, she sought out Reed to volunteer at HCNC, only to find out that the center was going to close. Perski’s goal is “to give a legacy to our communities, children, to volunteer with a purpose, to give unselfishly, to expect nothing back in return, to leave this life better than I found it. It is an act of responsibility to leave a positive legacy.” She decided to put her words into action and see what she could do to bring the nature center back to life.

During the meeting, former director Ranger Steve Mueller gave a brief history of the center and its primary goal of education. The Kent Intermediate School District (KISD) ran the facility from 1976 until it closed in 2005 because of budgetary constraints. The KISD owns the 142-acre facility and would be willing to negotiate a lease with a qualified nonprofit as they did with the Kent Conservation District (KCD).

KCD Chair, Connie Redding, explained that the KCD used the facility to not only provide educational opportunities to school children but as a demonstration site for the services that KCD provides to land owners in the county. She briefed that funding was the primary reason for not renewing their lease. During the four years that the KCD ran HCNC, the center ran a loss of about $30,000. She said, “We will be willing to help and are very supportive of this plan.”  One attendee asked about the 10-year Forestry Plan and she said the plan was still intact and all it needed was an individual or organization to execute it.

One of the primary agenda items was identification of potential directors/advisors for the board. While Perski has filed the initial forms for creating the nonprofit under the name Lily’s Frog Pad, a board must be established to take responsibility.

Reed said, “We are looking for a diversified board with different talents in such areas as finance, marketing, education, fund raising, and legal.” According to the draft by-laws, the board must have at least three members and up to ten. Cindy asked those interested in being on the board to leave their name. She plans to contact each and have a follow-up meeting within the next two weeks.

One of the first actions of the board is to agree on a name for the organization, which may be different from the actual center. Kathy affirmed that the Christensen family was supportive of this plan and of using the current name. Perski said that, from a marketing perspective, the organization’s name should be short, easy to remember and have an association with the location. An example she gave was “Pure Nature.” Those in attendance were asked to submit ideas for the organization’s name.

Reed was questioned about current funding for the group and she said that a $3,000 matching grant was available once the organization could open a checking account. She said she already had matching funds for this. The historical operating expenses for part-time operation was between $35,000 and $40,000.

There was a great deal of positive input from the audience regarding potential uses, fundraising, and collaborating opportunities. The group left with a sense of encouragement that a bright new future awaits HCNC.

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Nature center closes again—temporarily


By Judy Reed

Kids and adults in the greater Cedar Springs area have fond memories of field trips to Howard Christensen Nature Center—walking the nature trails, identifying trees, leaves, and birds, seeing wildlife in its natural habitat. But yesterday, January 19, was the last field trip for kids at Howard Christensen Nature Center. At least for now.
In a move that no one seemed to know was coming, the board of the Kent Conservation District voted last week to cease programming at the nature center on Red Pine Drive due to a funding shortage.
The Kent Conservation District took over funding operations at the nature center in 2006 after the Kent Intermediate School District closed it in 2005 due to budget cuts. “Administrative and financial support was provided to the community because Kent Conservation District believes in the mission of Howard Christensen Nature Center to help people connect with nature through hands on, site-based experiences,” said KCD administrator Conning Redding. (We) have worked steadily to increase the nature center’s independence since 2006.” She went on to say that the programming at the center has not provided the funding necessary for sustained operation, and that because of limited resources, the board had to withdraw from involvement with the center.

Ranger Steve Mueller leads a group at a nature center outing.

According to Director Kathy Reed, the 2011 proposed budget is $45,000. Besides Reed, who is a part-time director, the center was staffed by eight part-time interpretive instructors, and one volunteer interpretive instructor. She added that several volunteers put in over 1,000 hours last year helping maintain the center. “They are very important to the facility as well,” she said.
Reed said that over 2,500 students visited the center last year, and 864 people attended their programs—up 227 people from the year before.
She noted that although the facility is closed, the public can still access the nature trails at the south entrance.
“It’s been a real rollercoaster,” remarked Reed. “What makes me so sad, is all the people affected. I’ve heard kids are praying in Sunday School for it to reopen, and I’ve had a lot of phone calls of support from the community.”
Reed doesn’t consider the closing to be permanent. She said she is currently in talks with another agency that could be promising, but the discussion is just beginning.
She asked that those that want to donate to help keep the center open should monitor the situation, and as soon as she has news she will alert the public. “It’s then that we will need support,” she said.
In the meantime, if you want to leave a message of encouragement or say that you will donate, you can do it on their facebook group page. We will have a link to their group on our facebook page.

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