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Tag Archive | "reading"

Reading Month at Cedar View


 

Cedar View students are enjoying an exciting and crazy schedule of reading activities throughout the month of March!  Students are creating quite the reading buzz around the building.  Candid conversations are occurring everywhere focused on who we are as readers, what it is we like to read, and how we might persuade someone else to read one of our favorite books!

As you walk through the halls, you’ll quickly notice favorite book covers plastered on lockers while other days you may see a classroom engaged in “Camp-Out Day” as they camp themselves in a quality text.  The month culminates with an all day “Read-a-thon” service learning project.  These classrooms are collecting their read-a-thon donations for causes including the Cedar Springs library, St. Jude’s Hospital, and the American Cancer Society.

4th grade teacher Noah Gregory created a school-wide “Book-o-logy Tournament,” similar to the NCAA March Madness basketball tournament.  Daily excitement builds as 32 of our favorite books prepare to face off.  Favorite new chapter books, tried and true classics, as well as well-loved picture books made it into the field.  Students cast their votes each day and are continuously checking the book bracket posted in the library to see which text will advance to the Final Four and ultimately become the Cedar View champion!

Further stretching our reading capabilities, we also have our annual “Battle of the Books” challenge.  Interested students signed up for a 10 week-10 book challenge.  Students will battle it out in a game show like trivia challenge in the days before spring break.  Thanks to a dedicated staff and a community of FANTASTIC readers, we are ENJOYING an exciting month at Cedar View!

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Tips To Turn Your Child Into A Better Reader


(StatePoint)  Reading is the most important skill that children need to master to be successful in school and life. However, kids increasingly are struggling with this most basic of academic abilities.

The United States currently has one of the lowest literacy rates in the developed world. According to the National Report Card, the country is experiencing a literacy crisis, with 68 percent of fourth graders and 69 percent of eighth graders testing below grade level in reading.

When children have difficulty reading, they quickly can fall behind their peers. Luckily, there are ways to improve almost any child’s reading proficiency.

“Telling children to try harder is not the key to developing better readers. Rather, students need to be taught the building blocks of words: phonograms and spelling rules,” says Denise Eide, a teacher and author of the new book, “Uncovering the Logic of English.”

There are many things parents can do to help:

• Explain writing is code. Many students guess wildly while reading because they have never realized words are made of individual sounds blended together. Show them how letters and groups of letters represent sounds. Then practice blending the sounds to form words.

• Teach all the sounds. Many letters say more than one sound. For example, the letter “S” sounds different in the word “sad” than the word “is.” Many students misread simple words, because they don’t know all the sounds.

• Make it fun. Learning the basics doesn’t need to be boring. Engage young children through play. Practice the phonograms with games, large motor activities and art projects.

• Cover pictures. Many young students struggle with the left to right eye movement of reading. Allow students to look at the pictures then cover them with a blank sheet of paper while reading. Covering pictures makes it easier to focus on text.

• Teach all nine ‘Silent E’ rules. Many students know only one reason for a silent final “E” — the vowel says its name because of the “E.” This explains words like “game” and “ripe,” but leaves many kids struggling to read “have” and “give.” Learning the nine reasons, including that English words do not end in “V,” prevents students from needing to memorize thousands of exceptions.

• Find answers. Too often we answer questions about reading with “that is an exception.” This frustrates many bright students and discourages them from reading. Rather than dismissing words as exceptions, look for answers and explanations. English is more logical than most Americans think.

Answers to questions about English reading and spelling can be found in “Uncovering the Logic of English” and by visiting www.logicofenglish.com.

“Many students complain English spelling appears inconsistent, especially highly logical children who may grow up to be scientists or mathematicians,” says Eide. “By teaching students how English works you will improve their reading abilities and encourage them to read!”

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Read and Relax in Michigan Parks


Park & Read Program Offers Free Park Passes for Michigan Readers

Spend a lazy day with a good book in the great outdoors compliments of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and the Library of Michigan.

Back for a third summer, the DNR and the Library of Michigan are offering their Park & Read program at more than 400 participating libraries across the state.

While checking out a book, Park & Read allows library cardholders to “check-out” a one-day pass that waives the Recreational Passport entry fee into any Michigan state park or recreation area. This $10 savings also provides a one-time, free access to more than 500 events taking place in state parks throughout the summer, and to make the day even more relaxing, some of the state parks are offering the loan of a hammock.

The Grand Rapids Public Library has been a part of the Park & Read program since its inception in 2009. Marking and Communications Manager Kristen Krueger-Corrado says the library saw participation jump by 10 percent last year.

“Many of our patrons are struggling to find work and making due with less. The Park & Read program allows them to have an inexpensive way to enjoy Michigan’s natural beauty, spend time with family and friends, and exercise their mind and body,” Krueger-Corrado said. “Many of our patrons expressed their excitement at being able to check out a Park & Read pass–it was the only way they were able to afford to take their family to the beach that summer. And who doesn’t love a day at the beach?”

Passes are valid for seven days from checkout and can be used for one day at any one of Michigan’s 98 state parks.  Passes are valid for day use only.  The program runs through Oct. 1, 2011.

For more information on the program and a complete list of participating libraries, hammock availability, and park events taking place throughout the state, visit www.michigan.gov/stateparks.

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Young Sand Lake reader visits Capitol


Rep. Pearce welcomes 2009 reading contest winner to Lansing

Katarina Michnick, 8, of Sand Lake, and her family, spent a day learning about the Michigan Capitol and the state Legislature with Rep. Tom Pearce as the winner of the lawmaker’s third annual reading program, in conjunction with local libraries.

Children who participated in their local summer reading program were able to enter their names in a random drawing, with each library forwarding a semi-finalist to Pearce. The Rockford lawmaker then drew the winner from those names.

“Reading during the summer is a great way for young people to continue to build and maintain their skills so they are ready for school to start,” Pearce said. “Reading is a key to success in all aspects of your life, as well as an enjoyable activity that can lead to enrichment as well as learning. I thank all the parents, librarians and teachers who help promote the importance and excitement of reading.”

Katarina Michnick, her mother and father, Mary and Gregory, and her brother Alexander, visited Lansing last week as the guest of Rep. Tom Pearce. Katarina was selected the winner of the lawmaker’s third annual reading program in conjunction with local libraries.

Katarina Michnick, her mother and father, Mary and Gregory, and her brother Alexander, visited Lansing last week as the guest of Rep. Tom Pearce. Katarina was selected the winner of the lawmaker’s third annual reading program in conjunction with local libraries.

Katarina, her mother and father Mary and Gregory, and her brother Alexander, toured the Capitol building, went on the House floor, attended a House committee session and visited the Michigan Historical Museum, along with being treated to lunch with Pearce.

“I liked the chandeliers in the hallways with the deer and elk on them and the big door hinges with the state Seal,” Katarina said of her first visit to the Capitol building. “It was also neat when Rep. Pearce told us about the first elevators working with water buckets as weight.”

The home school family was happy to add the Lansing visit to lessons on government learned while closely following the 2008 presidential election and inauguration. Even though Katarina is currently focusing her future on horse riding and ballerina training, she got in some legislative experience with Pearce by discussing her views against abortion with the lawmaker.

Katarina and Alexander each participated in the contest through the Sand Lake/Nelson Township Library.

Pearce’s reading program was available at Plainfield Township Library, Sand Lake/Nelson Township Library, Spencer Township Library, Tyrone Township Library, Krause Memorial Library, Comstock Park Library, Sparta Carnegie Township Library and Cedar Springs Library.

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