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Tag Archive | "Michigan Trails Week"

DNR announces name of new hiking and bicycling trail 


 

Michigan’s Iron Belle Trail follows the existing North Country National Scenic Trail for most of its length in Michigan, including through the Manistee National Forest (shown here). Photo courtesy of North Country Trail Association.

Michigan’s Iron Belle Trail follows the existing North Country National Scenic Trail for most of its length in Michigan, including through the Manistee National Forest (shown here). Photo courtesy of North Country Trail Association.

 

Michigan’s Iron Belle Trail will feature a bicycling route (shown in red) and a hiking route (shown in blue), utilizing many existing trails to provide healthy recreation opportunities and connect and showcase Michigan’s vibrant communities.



Michigan’s Iron Belle Trail will feature a bicycling route (shown in red) and a hiking route (shown in blue), utilizing many existing trails to provide healthy recreation opportunities and connect and showcase Michigan’s vibrant communities.

From the Michigan DNR

 

We asked and you answered—to the tune of nearly 9,000 name suggestions for Michigan’s planned, statewide hiking and bicycling trail stretching from Belle Isle Park in Detroit to Ironwood in the western Upper Peninsula. The Department of Natural Resources recently announced this showcase trail will officially be called Michigan’s Iron Belle Trail.

“This name effectively captures the beauty and strength of our state’s exceptional natural and cultural resources,” said DNR Director Keith Creagh. “Along the route from Belle Isle to Ironwood, Michigan’s Iron Belle Trail will ultimately connect communities, provide a variety of recreation opportunities, and showcase our great state to residents and visitors alike.”

Creagh said it’s important to note that while Michigan’s Iron Belle Trail is a work in progress, significant portions of the trail already exist throughout both peninsulas and are open right now for public enjoyment and exploration.

“The hard work and thoughtful vision that have for years gone into Michigan’s existing trail system and future connectors help to lay the groundwork for completion of this important cross-state trail,” Creagh said.

The DNR in September hosted a contest inviting residents and visitors to submit their best ideas to help name the trail. More than 8,800 submissions were received and then evaluated by a team representing partner organizations—the Michigan Trails Advisory Council, the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, the Michigan Recreation and Park Association and the Michigan Trails and Greenways Alliance—involved in the trail’s establishment. DNR Director Creagh chose the final name based on recommendations from that committee.

The trail-naming contest ran for three weeks (Sept. 22-Oct. 13, 2014), with entries submitted via online survey, Facebook and paper entry form. Contest participants also showed their support by sending hand-drawn logo concepts, personal stories about their connections to trails and even a stack of entries from elementary students.

The DNR received hundreds of variations of the final name. To determine contest winners, three names were randomly drawn from that smaller pool of entries: Amanda Mailer (Rochester, Michigan), Matthew Husted (Jerome, Michigan) and John Meikle (Lapeer, Michigan). Each will be awarded (via drawing) one of three vacation prize packages at locations along the trail:

The Henry Ford and Westin Book Cadillac Hotel in Detroit

The Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island

Kaug Wudjoo Lodge at Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park in Ontonagon

First proposed as a “showcase trail” by Gov. Rick Snyder in November 2012, Michigan’s Iron Belle Trail will stretch across Michigan and link numerous existing trails to provide both a 1,259-mile hiking route and a 774-mile bicycling route. One end of the trail lies in Michigan’s newest state park, Belle Isle Park (Wayne County); the other is more than 900 miles away in Ironwood (Gogebic County).

The Parks and Recreation Division of the DNR, as well as other partners, currently is seeking private and public funding to secure and develop trail corridors for Michigan’s Iron Belle Trail. Temporary connectors already are in place along much of the trail and will be made permanent as resources become available. For more information about the development of the trail, please contact DNR state trails coordinator Paul Yauk at 517-284-6141.

Additional segments of Michigan’s Iron Belle Trail will open throughout 2015, with ceremonial events in communities along the trail to locally mark the occasions.

Michigan’s Iron Belle Trail follows the existing North Country National Scenic Trail for most of its length in Michigan (1,085 of 1,259 miles). North Country Trail extends to the New York/Vermont border to the east and central North Dakota to the west. Spanning 4,600 miles, it is the longest National Scenic Trail in the nation. Michigan—a national leader in designated trail miles and plentiful opportunities for hiking, bicycling, snowmobiling, kayaking and other trail pursuits—continues to cement its reputation as the nation’s Trails State. The state offers more than 12,000 miles of recreational trails total.

An extensive Michigan State Trails system provides broad public access to low-cost, healthy recreation opportunities and strengthens communities’ appeal by boosting quality-of-life amenities.

The Department of Natural Resources works each year with local communities and partners to celebrate and promote Michigan’s excellent public trail offerings during Michigan Trails Week, which this year runs Sept. 19-26, 2015. The website offers many planning tools and ideas for participating community projects.

Visit the DNR website www.michigan.gov/dnrtrails to sign up for email updates and to learn more about Michigan’s Iron Belle Trail and other recreation trail offerings.

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Michigan Trails week


Free park admission Sept. 28

 

Celebrate Michigan Trails Week by getting outside and getting on a trail. Held Sept. 21-28 in the outdoor playground called Michigan, the week pays tribute to the state’s 12,000 miles of trails by offering a variety of events statewide, featuring activities from hiking to biking to kayaking and more.

The week culminates on Sept 28, National Public Lands Day, with free entry to all federal and state parks and participating local parks throughout Michigan and the opportunity for volunteerism—the statewide work bee—to support and maintain these trails. This year marks the 20th anniversary of National Public Lands Day. Access to Michigan state parks normally requires a Recreation Passport; that will be waived on Sept. 28. The special events, trail maintenance and clean-up opportunities and free admission are made possible by communities and organizations throughout the state in partnerships with the Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Michigan Recreation and Park Association (MRPA), and the Michigan Trails and Greenways Alliance (MTGA).

This month, Gov. Rick Snyder proclaimed the recreational, health and economic benefits of the state’s trail system with his second annual proclamation of Michigan Trails Week. In his proclamation, the governor states that the trail system provides several billion dollars to Michigan’s economy and a low-cost means to improve individual health, which can, in return, reduce health care costs.

“Michigan is a national leader in the number of miles of trails, providing tremendous outdoor recreation opportunities and substantial benefits to the state’s economy,” said DNR Director Keith Creagh. “From our state’s extensive inland water opportunities to more than 3,800 miles of trails used by off-road enthusiasts, Michigan is home to a unique variety and quantity of trails. Trails are resources to be celebrated not just during Michigan Trails Week, but all year long.”

The governor’s proclamation also pays tribute to the most popular means of enjoying the out-of-doors through trail-related activities, including hiking, walking, snowmobiling, running, biking, horseback riding, paddling, and using off-road vehicles. According to Ron Olson, chief of the DNR Parks and Recreation Division, whether you’re a novice or an expert, getting out on the trails during Michigan Trails Week and each week afterward is an important part of staying active and experiencing the state’s natural resources.

“Put on your well-worn hiking shoes or experience kayaking for the very first time,” he said. “Events held during this week are a great match for both the experienced and beginning trail user. From guided trail hikes to trail runs to bike rides and free kayaking programs through Recreation 101, there is something for everyone. Make this the start of your healthy, active lifestyle.”

All Michigan Trails Week events are found at www.michigan.gov/trailsweek.

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