web analytics

Tag Archive | "Michigan DNR"

Deer seasons in Michigan


 

 

It’s that time of year again, when hunters take to the woods for deer hunting season. For the most up to date changes and requirements for deer and other game licenses, see the Michigan DNR’s Hunting and Trapping Digest. It can be downloaded for free at www.michigan.gov/dnr.

Deer seasons:

Early Antlerless Firearm: Sept. 20-21

Liberty Hunt: Sept. 20-21

Independence Hunt: Oct. 16-19

Archery: Oct. 1 – Nov. 14 and Dec. 1 – Jan. 1

Regular Firearm: Nov. 15-30

Muzzleloading:

Zone 1: Dec. 5-14

Zone 2: Dec. 5-14

Zone 3: Dec. 5-21

Late Antlerless Firearm: Dec. 22 – Jan. 1

 

Posted in OutdoorsComments (0)

Is your tree stand safe?


 

 

Hunting from a tree stand is a popular way for hunters to enjoy their season, but nearly every year a Michigan hunter is seriously injured or killed falling out of a tree stand. Conservation officers at the Department of Natural Resources remind hunters of the top safety tips when it comes to tree stands.

Before a hunt, know your equipment:

• Read and understand the manufacturer’s instructions and warnings before using a tree stand and harness.

• Check the stand, straps and chains before you go out for signs of wear and tear or missing parts.

• Practice at ground level with your tree stand and harness with a friend or family member.

• Learn how to properly use your harness. The DNR recommends a full-body harness.

• Waist belts or upper body-only harnesses can cause serious injuries or death in a fall.

• When scouting for a tree:

• Choose a healthy, straight tree that is the right size to hold you and your stand.

• Check the tree beforehand for insect nests or animal dens.

• Avoid using climbing stands on smooth-barked trees, especially during icy or wet weather.

• Clear debris from the base of the tree to minimize injury from a fall and to ensure a sturdy base if using a ladder stand.

During your hunt:

• Tell a reliable person where you are hunting and when you can be expected to return.

• Wear a full-body harness and make sure it is connected to the tree at all times. If using a ladder stand or climbing sticks, attach the harness before securing the platform to the tree or stepping onto it.

• Climb higher than your stand and always step down onto your platform.

• Wear boots with non-slip soles.

• Never carry equipment when climbing – use a haul line to raise and lower equipment, unloaded firearm or bow. Do not attach the line near the trigger or trigger guard of your firearm.

• Have emergency equipment – a knife, cellphone, flashlight and/or whistle.

“DNR conservation officers responding to tree-stand falls see the same mistakes over and over – not using a harness or a haul line,” said Sgt. Tom Wanless, supervisor of the DNR hunter education program. “Nationally, 82 percent of hunters who fall from a tree stand are wearing a harness, but it’s not connected. And 86 percent of tree-stand falls take place during the climb up or down. Harnesses and haul lines save lives.”

For more information about tree stand safety, go to the Treestand Manufacturers Association website at www.tmastands.com.

For more information about hunting in Michigan, visit the DNR website at www.michigan.gov/hunting.

 

 

Posted in OutdoorsComments (0)

Fishing in Michigan


 

The Michigan DNR reminds anglers that a new fishing license season began  April 1, and that Michigan’s fishing licenses were restructured. There are now five options to choose from when making your purchase. All fishing licenses are good for all species.

•   Resident Annual – $26

•   Non-Resident Annual – $76

•   Senior Annual (for residents age 65 or older) – $11

•    24-Hour (resident or non-resident) – $10

•    72-Hour (resident or non-resident) – $30

Residents and non-residents can also purchase the Hunt/Fish combo license for $76 and $266 respectively that consists of a base license, annual fishing license, and two deer tags. Please note, a base license is not required when just purchasing a fishing license.

Michigan’s new fishing licenses will bring additional revenue into the state that will be invested into the state’s fisheries; including providing greater access to world-class fishing opportunities, improving fisheries habitat in inland lakes and streams, and increasing the health and quantity of fish stocked in the state.
Fisheries Division does not receive any general funds and depends on angler dollars (through license sales and federal excise tax dollars for fishing tackle) to manage the state’s fisheries. Buying a fishing license, even if you do not plan to fish, can make a big difference to the future health of Michigan’s prized freshwaters.

There are two simple ways to purchase a fishing license in Michigan:

1. Visit your local license retailer or DNR Operations Service Center and make a purchase in person.

2. Use the E-License system to buy a license online 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Just visit www.mdnr-elicense.com on your computer, smartphone or tablet to get started.
Don’t miss your chance to experience some of the finest freshwater fishing in the world!

For more information on fishing in Michigan, visit www.michigan.gov/fishing

Posted in OutdoorsComments Off

New fishing, hunting and ORV license structure begins March 1


From the Michigan DNR

 

Michigan’s fishing, hunting and ORV licenses will change beginning March 1, 2014. The new license structure authorized by the Legislature and signed into law by Gov. Rick Snyder, in 2013, makes buying a license easier and provides vital funding to improve outdoor recreation opportunities for anglers, hunters, trappers and ORV riders.

“By greatly reducing the number of license types and enhancing our sales system, we’re simplifying the license-buying process,” said Department of Natural Resources Director Keith Creagh. “This new structure keeps Michigan’s license costs competitive with other Great Lakes states, and makes a critical investment in our natural resources and outdoor recreation—putting more boots on the ground, waders in the water and eyes in the field.”

Among the most significant changes to the license structure:

Anglers will no longer need to choose between restricted and all-species fishing licenses. All fishing licenses will be good for all species.
An ORV trail permit will be required, in addition to the ORV license, for riding on state-designated trails, routes and scramble areas.
A base license will be required for all hunters. In addition to providing critical funding for wildlife conservation and management, the base license allows hunters to hunt small game and purchase additional hunting licenses for other species.
Outdoor enthusiasts can purchase a hunt/fish combo license that includes a base license, a deer combo license (two tags), and an all-species fishing license.
A single deer license, valid throughout archery, firearm and muzzleloader seasons, replaces the separate archery and firearm licenses. The deer combo license remains available for hunters who wish to harvest two bucks.

The license-buying process will also be improved, with streamlined options for simplified purchasing at retail agents and a new mobile option that will allow users to buy licenses using their smartphone or tablet and store non-kill tag licenses as a PDF on their mobile device.

Additional funding from these changes will enable the Department of Natural Resources and its partners to provide:

Better hunting opportunities – expanded habitat management on public and private lands to enhance habitat for deer, pheasant, grouse, woodcock, turkey and other game species.
Greater access to world-class fishing opportunities – improved fisheries habitat in inland lakes and streams, and increased health and quantity of fish stocked.
A first-rate ORV trail network, providing enhanced riding opportunities and benefiting local economies.
Increased protection of natural resources and a safer outdoor recreation experience for residents and visitors by increasing the number of conservation officers in the field.
Expanded outreach and education for new and existing hunters and anglers.

The all-species fishing, base hunting and hunt/fish combo licenses will include a new $1 surcharge. In accordance with statute, revenue generated from these funds will be used to educate the public on the benefits of hunting, fishing and trapping in Michigan, and the impact of these activities on the conservation, preservation and management of the state’s natural resources.

For more information about the license restructuring—including license prices, frequently asked questions and details about how license dollars will be invested, visit www.michigan.gov/dnr and click on “hunting and fishing license structure” under “In the Know.”

Posted in OutdoorsComments Off