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Tag Archive | "Michigan Department of Natural Resources"

Taking action now can reduce bear problems later

Property owners can help prevent problems with bears by removing food sources like bird feeders now.

With longer daylight hours and warming temperatures causing wildlife to start to move, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources advises property owners that now is the time to look around and see if they have items that soon may be attracting bears.

“The ideal situation is for a bear to walk past your property, not find a food reward and move along on its own,” said DNR wildlife communication coordinator Katie Keen. “That’s the best way to live with bears and not encourage conflict.”

Black bears—an “up north” Michigan icon decorating many homes, restaurants and hotels—can be found throughout more than half the state. Spotting a bear tends to draw a lot of interest and attention. 

“Everyone picks up the phone to call us looking for advice at a different point,” Keen said. “For some, seeing a black bear is enough. For others, it may be regular or daytime visits that make them uneasy.”

Bears find birdseed and suet especially attractive, as they are high-calorie and reliable compared to other plentiful and natural food sources. Bird feeders can draw bears past their natural habitat, where they would normally be enjoying roots of early spring plants and insects in trees and logs. Bears also typically will continue to return to a location once they have found a food reward there.

“The majority of calls we receive about bears involve a bird feeder. Taking the feeders down before they are found by a bear can eliminate future problems,” said Keen. “A bear doesn’t just forget an easy meal, and wild animals can pick up habits.”  

During the spring and early summer, phone calls to the DNR from home and business owners frustrated with bear activity increase. While it is legal to feed birds, property owners may be creating an irreversible safety issue by providing food for bears. 

“Bears that receive a food reward when around homes, yards and neighborhoods typically lose their natural fear of humans and can become a potential threat to people and their pets,” Keen added.

The easiest thing people can do to avoid problems with bears is remove bird feeders during the spring and summer months. With an estimated 2,000-plus adult bears in the northern Lower Peninsula and almost 10,000 in the Upper Peninsula, there are plenty of bears searching for natural food that is plentiful in forests, fields and wetlands.

“Many people who live in northern Michigan remove their bird feeders during the spring and summer, but every year the spring sneaks up on us and suddenly, it is now that time of year,” said Keen. 

Wild animals should be appreciated from a distance. Michigan residents can help their neighborhoods and communities by removing bird feeders and other attractants. Garbage cans, dumpsters, barbeque grills, restaurant grease bins and bee hives also can attract bears to areas people frequent.

For your safety, never intentionally feed or try to tame bears – it is in your, and the bear’s, best interest. It is critical that bears retain their natural fear of humans.

Learn more about Michigan’s black bears and how to prevent potential problemsby visiting michigan.gov/bear or by watching “The Bear Essentials” video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y6c1c3qw7dg.

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Spring birding tours at Michigan’s Wetland Wonders 

Red-winged blackbirds are some of spring’s first arrivals at Michigan’s Wetland Wonders.

Nothing says spring like the “conk-a-ree” call of a red-winged blackbird or the raucous sounds of a sandhill crane. Celebrate spring and explore Michigan’s wetlands with a birding tour at one of the Wetland Wonders – or managed waterfowl areas – around the state.

Highlights of the birding tours may include diving and dabbling ducks in full breeding plumage, trumpeter and tundra swans, osprey, bald eagles, sandhill cranes, and many others. Michigan Department of Natural Resources wildlife staff members and volunteers from Ducks Unlimited and Audubon Clubs will lead the tours, which may include a “sneak peek” driving tour into refuge areas that normally are closed. 

The birding tours will be held on the following dates:

  • March 17 at 8 a.m. – St. Clair Flats State Wildlife Area, 3857 Columbine Road, Harsens Island; 810-748-9504 
  • March 24 at 9 a.m. – Fish Point State Game Area, 7750 Ringle Road, Unionville; 989-674-2511
  • March 31 at 9 a.m. – Fennville Farm Unit of the Allegan State Game Area, 6013 118th Ave., Fennville; 269-673-2430
  • April 7 at 9 a.m. – Maple River State Game Area, southwest corner of South Baldwin and Crapo roads in Washington Township, east of U.S. 127; 616-446-0555
  • April 7 at 9 a.m. – Shiawassee River State Game Area, 225 East Spruce St., St. Charles; 989-865-6211
  • April 14 at 9 a.m. – Muskegon County Wastewater System, meet at the Muskegon State Game Area Office, 7600 E. Messinger Road, Twin Lake; 231-788-5055
  • April 14 at 9 a.m. – Pointe Mouillee State Game Area, 37025 Mouillee Road, Rockwood; 734-379-9692
  • April 14 at 9 a.m. – Nayanquing Point State Wildlife Area, 1570 Tower Beach Road, Pinconning; 989-697-5101

If you have questions about bird tours, please contact the appropriate office at the phone number listed above. Most tours will meet at the area’s headquarters building. Please dress for the weather and bring binoculars. Spotting scopes are also helpful for long-range viewing. The ground may be quite muddy and wet, so plan to wear boots. 

Michigan’s Wetland Wonders are the seven premier managed waterfowl hunt areas in the state: Fennville Farm Unit at the Allegan State Game Area (Allegan County), Fish Point State Wildlife Area (Tuscola County), St. Clair Flats State Wildlife Area on Harsens Island (St. Clair County), Muskegon County Wastewater Facility (Muskegon County), Nayanquing Point State Wildlife Area (Bay County), Pointe Mouillee State Game Area (Monroe and Wayne counties) and Shiawassee River State Game Area (Saginaw County). To learn more about Michigan’s Wetland Wonders, visit michigan.gov/wetlandwonders

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Birding tour of Ottawa County set for Jan. 31

Participants in the Jan. 31 birding tour might get a rare opportunity to see a harlequin duck that has been spotted on Lake Macatawa since December.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Ottawa County Parks and Recreation will lead a guided caravan birding tour of coastal Ottawa County Wednesday, Jan. 31, beginning at 10 a.m. and concluding at approximately 2 p.m.

No signup is necessary. The tour will begin from Hemlock Crossing Nature Education Center, located at 8115 West Olive Road in West Olive. After a brief introduction, the tour will proceed to Holland State Park, Port Sheldon and Grand Haven State Park, with the itinerary adjusting for preferred open-water areas and bird concentrations.

Michigan bird conservation coordinator Caleb Putnam of Audubon Great Lakes and the DNR, other DNR staff members and Ottawa County Parks naturalist Curtis Dykstra will be on hand to answer questions about wildlife management, habitat projects under way at state and county parks, and hunting opportunities.

The tour will focus on open-water pockets with concentrations of waterfowl and gulls. Participants should expect to see thousands of waterfowl, including common and red-breasted mergansers, common goldeneyes, several species of gulls, and with luck, a rarity such as a black-legged kittiwake or harlequin duck (one of each has been present at Lake Macatawa since December).

Participants should dress for very cold temperatures, snow/rain and high winds, and should bring binoculars and spotting scopes if possible. The trip leaders will have a small number of scopes available for those who do not have them.

The Recreation Passport ($11 for Michigan vehicles, $5 for Michigan motorcycles) is required for vehicle entry to all 103 Michigan state parks. Michigan residents can purchase the Recreation Passport by checking “YES” when renewing license plates at a Secretary of State branch office, self service station or online.

Those who didn’t check “YES,” or are visiting in a nonresident vehicle, can purchase a window sticker at the park’s visitor contact station. Please note that when purchased on-site, a $5 processing fee is added, bringing the cost to $16. Nonresidents pay $32 for an annual pass or $9 for a day pass. The Recreation Passport is valid until the next vehicle plate renewal date. For details, visit www.michigan.gov/recreationpassport.

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Add adventure to your New Year’s resolutions 

There are countless benefits to using Michigan’s state parks, trails and waterways as your gym, such as burning calories while snowshoeing the many hundreds of miles of trails across the state.

with Shoe Year’s hikes and other outdoor fun

Reinvigorate yourself in 2018! Make an “adventure resolution” and commit to exploring Michigan’s great outdoors this year with a “Shoe Year’s” hike, cross-country skiing, fat-tire biking or the many other ways to relish winter. The Michigan Department of Natural Resources encourages residents to shift their plans for the coming year into high gear with a few ideas for inspired outdoor fun.

“For many, winter in Michigan is an undiscovered gem,” said Ron Olson, chief of the DNR Parks and Recreation Division. “State parks and trails offer visitors a completely different experience in the winter, everything from peaceful hikes through snow-dusted campgrounds and candlelight cross-country skiing to black diamond downhill skiing with views of Lake Superior in the Upper Peninsula. A Michigan winter adventure should be on everyone’s list this season.”

Find an online calendar listing of Shoe Year’s hikes and First Day Hikes at michigan.gov/winterfun. Or explore Michigan’s parks, trails and waterways on your own at www.michigan.gov/stateparks.

The following Shoe Year’s guided hikes take place through the first week of January:

  • Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park (Ontonagon County) – Friday, Dec. 29 from 6 to 9 p.m.
  • Bay City Recreation Area (Bay County) – Sunday, Dec. 31 from 1 to 5 p.m.
  • Maybury State Park (Wayne County) – Sunday, Dec. 31 from 10 to 11:30 a.m.
  • Island Lake Recreation Area (Livingston County) – Monday, Jan. 1 from 1 *Yankee Springs Recreation Area (Barry County) – Monday, Jan. 1 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (First Day Hike)
  • Straits State Park (Cheboygan County) – Saturday, Jan. 6 from 2 to 7 p.m.
  • Besser Natural Area (Alpena County) – Saturday, Jan. 6 from noon to 3 p.m.
  • Ludington State Park (Mason County) – Saturday, Jan. 6 from 6 to 8 p.m.

Michigan is part of the nationwide First Day Hikes program, coordinated by the National Association of State Park Directors and inspired by the First Day Hikes that originated more than 25 years ago at the Blue Hills Reservation, a state park in Milton, Massachusetts. Last year, more than 62,000 people participated on guided hikes that covered more than 114,000 miles on 1,300 hikes across the country.

If guided hikes don’t work into your schedule, but you are looking for an adventure checklist, here are a few winter adventures suggested by Maia Turek, resource development specialist for the DNR:

  • Muskegon Winter Sports Complex – Even a novice adventurer will love the variety of adventure options at this state park destination. A luge, ice skating through the woods, sledding, skiing and even yurt yoga classes are all part of the experience. Visit msports.org.
  • Experience the lantern-lit or candlelight ski and snowshoe events—even if just once. They happen throughout the winter and around the state, so finding one that works for your schedule should be easy. Visit michigan.gov/dnrcalendar.
  • Fat tire biking on the Cadillac Pathway – This 11.3-mile groomed ski, hike and bike trail with six loops is marked and groomed for novice and intermediate cross-country skiers. Rent a fat-tire bike from area bike shops or use your own. Visit michigan.gov/dnrtrails.
  • Grab a fishing rod and take advantage of the first of two Free Fishing Weekends Feb. 17-18. Twice a year, residents and non-residents can enjoy two back-to-back days of fishing without a license. Visit michigan.gov/freefishing.
  • Visit Palms Book State Park in the Upper Peninsula and be amazed by Kitch-iti-kipi’s geothermal energy. Because the water is 45 degrees year-round, this stunning spring is a four-season destination. It’s also a great snowmobile stop. Visit michigan.gov/palmsbook.
  • Jump on the Iron Belle Trail, the longest designated state trail in the nation, and hike (or bicycle) your way between Belle Isle Park in Detroit and Ironwood in the western Upper Peninsula. Experience exciting cities, explore pristine forests and visit charming towns all across the state. Visit michigan.gov/ironbelle.
  • Porcupine Mountains Ski Area – Downhill skiers and snowboarders will enjoy 15 groomed trails, four glade trails, the second-highest vertical drop in Michigan (or Wisconsin) and breathtaking views of Lake Superior. The ski area also offers a launching point for cross-country skiing and snowshoeing. Visit porkiesfun.com.

“Often, the term resolution for the new year seems daunting, but don’t let it overwhelm you,” said Turek. “From participating in a guided hike along the more than 12,500 miles of state-designated trails, cross-country skiing on groomed trails and snowshoeing along lantern-lit trails to experiencing the ice skating trail at the Muskegon Winter Sports Complex, these destinations are home to unique and calorie-burning options for experiencing the outdoors in the coming year.”

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New reservation policy at state parks


Will give more campers better opportunities at sites 

A new DNR camping reservation policy that will help make it easier for more people to secure campsites in Michigan state parks further in advance, takes effect Nov. 1. Camping reservations can be booked up to six months ahead of time at www.midnrreservations.com.

In an effort to make it easier for more people to have a chance at securing campsites at many of the state’s most-visited parks, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources has put in place a new policy that encourages people to firm up their reservations further in advance of their planned camping dates. The new sliding modification and cancellation structure takes effect Nov. 1.

Campers still can make reservations up to six months in advance. Under the current policy, the cost to cancel or modify a camping reservation is $10. The new structure still will include the $10 modification and cancellation fee, but also will include an additional incremental fee based on the length of time between the date the initial reservation was made and the planned arrival date. That incremental fee will be determined by the length of time a reservation is held:

*Reservations held for up to two months: 10 percent of the nightly rate for each modified/canceled camp night.

*Reservations held for between two to three months: 15 percent of the nightly rate for each modified/canceled camp night.

*Reservations held for between three and four months: 20 percent of the nightly rate for each modified/canceled camp night.

*Reservations held for between four and five months: 30 percent of the nightly rate for each modified/canceled camp night.

*Reservations held longer than five months: 40 percent of the nightly rate for each modified/canceled camp night.

Note: There will not be a fee to modify a reservation that adds camp nights.

Rather than holding onto several blocks of campsites at a campground – or in some cases, multiple campgrounds – the new policy incentivizes campers to finalize their plans as soon as possible.

“We are updating the current policy to encourage campers with reservations to make any necessary changes to their travel plans much earlier in the process, which opens up more sites for others who currently may experience difficulty finding space at our more popular campgrounds,” said Ron Olson, DNR Parks and Recreation Division chief. “Rather than waiting for cancellations that may or may not happen close to their own desired travel dates, more campers will find that the new reservation policy will give them access to a variety of sites much earlier.”

For more information on camping opportunities and pricing, visit  www.michigan.gov/camping. Camping reservations can be booked up to six months in advance at Michigan state parks. Campers are encouraged to visit  www.midnrreservations.com or call 1-800-44PARKS (1-800-447-2757) to check on availability. Remaining camping spots are available on a first-come, first-served basis.

For more information, contact Jason Fleming, chief of the Resource Management Section in the DNR Parks and Recreation Division, at 517-284-6098 or flemingj@michigan.gov.

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Another Montcalm deer suspected to have CWD

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources announced on Tuesday, October 24, that a second hunter-harvested deer in Montcalm County is suspected positive for chronic wasting disease. A sample has been sent to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, for confirmation. If confirmed positive, the 1.5-year-old buck, harvested in Sidney Township, would be the 11th free-ranging deer in Michigan found to have CWD.

“The fact that we already have another positive deer within Montcalm County is of major concern,” said Dr. Kelly Straka, DNR state wildlife veterinarian. “We strongly recommend hunters who harvest deer in Montcalm County have their deer tested. Deer with CWD can look perfectly healthy even though they are infected.”

To date, there have been no reported cases of CWD infection in humans. However, as a precaution, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization recommend that infected animals not be consumed as food by either humans or domestic animals. 

Since May 2015 when the first CWD deer was found, the DNR has tested more than 15,000 deer. Thus far, 10 cases of CWD have been confirmed in free-ranging white-tailed deer from Clinton, Ingham and Montcalm counties.

As additional deer have tested positive for CWD within Michigan, the DNR has put specific regulations in place. This deer was harvested in the Montcalm-Kent Core CWD Area, which includes Maple Valley, Pine, Douglass, Montcalm, Sidney, Eureka, and Fairplain townships in Montcalm County; and Spencer and Oakfield townships in Kent County. Starting Nov. 15, this nine-township area will have mandatory deer check.

As announced previously, the DNR will hold a town hall meeting Wednesday, Oct. 25, 6 to 8 p.m. in the Ash Foundation Building, located within the Montcalm County Fairgrounds at 8784 Peck Road in Greenville, Michigan.

At the meeting, Dr. Straka and DNR deer specialist Chad Stewart will provide information on chronic wasting disease, its effects on deer and deer populations, and DNR actions to date in responding to the discovery of the disease. Dr. Cheryl Collins, veterinarian from the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, will be present to provide information and answer questions related to farmed deer.

Chronic wasting disease is a fatal neurological disease that affects white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk and moose. It is caused by the transmission of infectious, self-multiplying proteins (prions) contained in saliva and other body fluids of infected animals. Susceptible animals can acquire CWD by direct exposure to these fluids, from environments contaminated with these fluids, or from the carcass of a diseased animal. 

Some CWD-infected animals will display abnormal behaviors, progressive weight loss and physical debilitation; however, deer can be infected for many years without showing internal or external symptoms. There is no cure; once a deer is infected with CWD, it will die. 

To learn more about CWD, visit mi.gov/cwd

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A great time to discover your next outdoor adventure

Michigan offers more than 1,800 miles of designated biking trails across the state. This group of riders is in Grand Traverse County on a variety of types of bikes. Trails Week is a great time to get out and enjoy a ride along the bike trails.

Michigan Trails Week, Sept. 23-30

When it comes to trails, there’s no place like Michigan. With trails that cater to a variety of passions—from biking, hiking and snowmobiling to off-roading, paddling and horseback riding—Michigan has a trail for you. Michigan Trails Week, Sept. 23-30, is the perfect time to hit the trails for the first time or try your hand (or feet) at a new trail adventure.

“If you want to get out and really enjoy the great outdoors, Michigan is the place to be,” said Paul Yauk, statewide trails coordinator for the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. “Our trails take you to every corner of the state, with stops at some of the most picturesque locations in the country, a number of fascinating historical sites and attractions, and more than 100 state parks.”

Michigan has more than 12,500 miles of designated state trails that connect communities and provide real health and economic benefits. No matter where in Michigan you are, chances are you can find hiking and biking trails, equestrian trails, snowmobile trails, off-road vehicle trails and even water trails that will link you to many areas of the state.

In his proclamation declaring this year’s Michigan Trails Week, Gov. Rick Snyder cited “Michigan’s rich network of trails throughout the Upper and Lower peninsulas” that “provide residents and visitors with scenic spaces in which to explore nature, appreciate wildlife, experience solitude or enjoy time with family and friends.”

Those are pretty good reasons why Michigan is cementing its reputation as The Trails State, said Yauk. Michigan also offers:

*The Iron Belle Trail, the longest designated state trail in the nation, is a 2,000-mile journey winding from Ironwood in the western Upper Peninsula to Belle Isle in Detroit, crisscrossing more than half of Michigan’s counties along both hiking and biking routes. Michigan’s Iron Belle Trail showcases many of the state’s natural and cultural resources, from national lakeshores to historic industrial areas.

*Thousands of miles of ORV trails that are constantly being upgraded through funding generated by the sale of ORV licenses and trail permits. These dollars help fund the restoration of many existing trails and the ability to link more communities across the state.

*The largest statewide rail-trail system in the nation, with more than 2,600 miles of old railroad lines that have been converted for recreational use.

*Thousands of miles of equestrian, snowmobile and water trail opportunities throughout the state, strengthening Michigan’s position as the nation’s Trails State.

The DNR again is partnering with the Michigan Trails and Greenways Alliance, the Michigan Recreation and Park Association, and communities throughout the state to offer trails information and opportunities during Michigan Trails Week and all year long.

Michigan Trails Week concludes Saturday, Sept. 30, which is National Public Lands Day, traditionally a day for volunteer-led efforts to beautify and build awareness about the value and breadth of U.S. public lands. In fact, more than 30 percent of America’s land is public.

For more information about Michigan’s trails system and Michigan Trails Week opportunities, community resources and events throughout the state, visit the DNR website at www.michigan.gov/trailsweek.

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Living Resources patches available for purchase 


The 2016-2017 Michigan’s Living Resources patch featuring the American robin, along with several patches from previous years, will be available for purchase through the end of September.

Through end of September

The 2016-2017 Michigan’s Living Resources patch featuring the American robin, along with several patches from previous years, will be available for purchase on the Michigan e-store at https://media.state.mi.us/MichiganeStore/public/Home.aspx through the end of September. (Go to the home page, then click on Patches, Mugs, and t-shirts.)

The Living Resources patch program has raised awareness of Michigan’s nongame species for over 40 years, with the first Living Resources patch issued in 1975 featuring the Kirtland’s warbler.

Proceeds from the sale of these patches goes into the Nongame Fish and Wildlife Fund, which provides a source of funding for projects vital to the needs of Michigan’s endangered, threatened and nongame animals, plants and their habitats.

Funds for these important management efforts also have been raised through voluntary check-off contributions on the state income tax form, sales of the wildlife habitat specialty license plate and direct donations.

Today, those interested in contributing can support the fund through purchase of a wildlife habitat license plate, making a tax-deductible donation or purchasing a patch.

Those who would like to request a mail-in order form can contact the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Division at 517-284-WILD (9453).

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Winners of tree-planting grants announced


$70,110 awarded to Michigan communities

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources, DTE Energy Foundation and ReLeaf Michigan announce the award of $70,110 to 29 organizations in Michigan to plant 750 trees along community streets, in parks and other public spaces.

In our area, both the Village of Sparta and the Sparta Recreation Authority each received a grant of $3,000.

This tree-planting grant program is sponsored by the DTE Energy Foundation in partnership with the DNR and ReLeaf Michigan as part of a long-standing commitment to improving communities and the environment throughout the state.

“These trees will help improve community quality of life and the environment through beautification, cleaning the air, increasing tree canopy to produce cooling shade, and providing habitat for wildlife,” said Kevin Sayers, DNR Urban and Community Forestry program coordinator.

The tree-planting grants are part of a long-term initiative to partner with communities, schools and nonprofits on programs to take care of the environment, noted Faye Nelson, vice president of DTE Energy and board chair and president of the DTE Energy Foundation.

“The DTE Energy Foundation has always believed it is our responsibility to sustain and protect Michigan’s legacy—from  its cultural institutions to its beautiful natural environment—and to help build its future,” Nelson said. “As good environmental stewards, we are proud to support the 2017 tree-planting program and partner with the DNR to invest in the future of our state by ensuring these spaces are enjoyed for generations to come.”

Grants awarded under this program will be used to help purchase trees of various species and sizes to be planted this fall or next spring.

ReLeaf Michigan, a nonprofit organization, works closely with communities statewide to replenish tree canopies through volunteer tree-planting events. Communities interested in coordinating local volunteer tree-planting or educational events are encouraged to contact ReLeaf Michigan to find out how they can assist. Call, email or visit them online at 1-800-642-7353, info@releafmichigan.org, or  www.releafmichigan.org.

For more information or a list of approved grants contact Kevin Sayers at 517-284-5898 or visit the program website at www.mi.gov/ucf. For additional information about the DTE Energy Foundation, please contact Anne O’Dell at 313-235-5555.

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Enjoy Meteors & S’mores during Perseid meteor shower

Michigan state parks offer great natural spaces for gathering with friends and family and enjoying a variety of special events, like Meteors & S’mores and other seasonal programming that takes advantage of each park’s natural amenities.

At state parks Aug. 11-12

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources invites visitors and campers to catch a view of the Perseid meteor shower during “Meteors & S’mores” in participating Michigan state parks Aug. 11-12.

Day-use visitors and campers at participating state parks are encouraged to bring blankets, seating, bug spray and snacks and enjoy a night of stargazing.

Participating parks will stay open later than their normal closing times. Complimentary s’mores and campfires are part of the celebration. Designated viewing areas and viewing times will be specified at each park.

“Many consider themselves lucky if they catch a shooting star, but the Perseid meteor shower is one of the best opportunities to see them with the naked eye,” said Elissa Buck, a DNR event coordinator. “We encourage those who want to catch magnificent views with fellow parkgoers take part in one of these Meteors & S’mores events.”

The calendar of events can be found online at michigan.gov/darksky and also is listed below.

South Higgins Lake State Park (Roscommon County) Friday, Aug. 11, 9 to 11 p.m.

Muskegon State Park (Muskegon County) Friday, Aug. 11, 9 to 11:30 p.m.

Lakeport State Park (St. Clair County) Friday, Aug. 11, 9:30 to 10:30 p.m.

Island Lake Recreation Area (Livingston County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 8 to 11 p.m.

Fort Wilkins State Park (Keweenaw County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 8 to 11:45 p.m.

North Higgins Lake State Park (Roscommon County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 9 to 10:30 p.m.

Leelanau State Park (Leelanau County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 9 to 10:30 p.m.

Young State Park (Charlevoix County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 9 to 11 p.m.

Clear Lake State Park (Montmorency County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 9 to 11:30 p.m.

Wilderness State Park (Emmet County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 9 to 11:30 p.m.

Van Buren State Park (Van Buren County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 9 to 11:45 p.m.

Warren Dunes State Park (Berrien County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 9 p.m. to midnight

Van Riper State Park (Marquette County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 9:30 to 10:30 p.m.

Holland State Park (Ottawa County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 10 to 11 p.m.

Indian Lake State Park (Delta County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 10 to 11:30 p.m.

Bald Mountain Recreation Area (Oakland County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 10 to 11:30 p.m.

Seven Lakes State Park (Oakland County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 10 to 11:45 p.m.

Negwegon State Park (Alcona and Alpena counties) Saturday, Aug. 12, 9 to 11 p.m.

About Dark Sky parks in Michigan

Dark Sky Preserves are protected against light pollution and are ideal locations for stargazing. Here in Michigan, six state-designated Dark Sky Preserves are located at Lake Hudson Recreation Area, Negwegon State Park, Port Crescent State Park, Rockport Recreation Area, Thompson’s Harbor State Park and Wilderness State Park. In addition, Michigan’s Upper Peninsula offers excellent night sky viewing opportunities across more than 15,000 square miles. Learn more at michigan.gov/darksky.

Camp under the stars

To take full advantage of the meteor showers that are estimated to take place Aug. 9-16, visitors are encouraged to make camping reservations throughout the week and sleep under the stars. To check camping availability in state parks and make a reservation, visit www.midnrreservations.com or call 1-800-44PARKS.

For more information about these events, contact Elissa Buck at bucke@michigan.gov or 989-313-0000.

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