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Tag Archive | "Michigan Department of Natural Resources"

DNR releases 2014 deer season forecast 


OUT-deer-season-forecastThe Michigan Department of Natural Resources today announced that its annual deer season forecast (2014 Deer Hunting Prospects) is now available online. DNR deer program biologists predict that hunters this season will see similar success rates as in 2013. The forecast is designed to give hunters a better idea of what to expect in the woods this season and includes:

Regional information breakdowns for the Upper Peninsula, the northern Lower Peninsula and the southern Lower Peninsula.

An overview of important changes for this license year, including information on multiple-year deer regulations, the new hunting and fishing license options, deer management unit boundaries for southern Michigan, and more.

Updates on wildlife health and diseases.

To acces the forecast, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr then click on hunting & trapping, then click on big game. Scroll down the page to the white-tailed deer section and click on 2014 deer season forecast.

For more tips and information on having a safe, successful deer season (including location of deer-check stations, antler point restriction FAQs and hunting digests), visit the DNR website www.michigan.gov/deer.

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Not everyone goes south for the winter


For some, the Great Lakes are a winter destination

Did you know the Great Lakes have thousands of feathered friends floating out there right now? Have you ever wondered how duck, geese and swan populations are tracked?

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, along with many other states in the nation, estimate duck, geese and swan populations (waterfowl) by looking at areas that traditionally hold birds in January—the open water.

“Anytime Mother Nature causes wildlife to naturally group together, surveying can be much more efficient,” said DNR wildlife biologist Mark Monroe. “Looking for birds by truck or plane at the same time across the nation gives agencies a great feel for populations and habitat trends.”

From Jan. 5-11, DNR staff visited (either by plane or truck) the same areas that have been surveyed in the past, not just to count waterfowl but also to identify the species. Mallards were the most common duck observed, although many “diving ducks” or sea ducks—such as canvasbacks and redheads—were counted.

“I’ve been flying this survey in the northern Lower Peninsula for quite a few years,” said Monroe, “and I have seen thousands of ducks every year out in the open water; it’s really neat to see.”

The northern Lower Peninsula area was flown by plane. One DNR pilot and two DNR observers spent the day traveling over 750 miles, searching out large groups of waterfowl in water that still remains open. The Manistee River, Lake Michigan from Pentwater to the Sleeping Bear Dunes, the inlet at Elberta and the Grand Traverse Bay area are locations in Northern Michigan where large numbers of birds are traditionally found. The crew revisits other “hot spots” where they have found waterfowl populations in the past, conducting flyovers at elevations of 200 to 500 feet. The Great Lakes and large rivers hold thousands of ducks that will spend the winter here, either because they are resident birds and do not migrate or because they have migrated to the Great Lakes from farther north. That’s right—some waterfowl that breed near the Arctic will actually head south to the Great Lakes to winter!

“In the northern Lower Peninsula we counted just over 12,000 ducks, just under 100 geese and more than 300 mute swans,” said Monroe. “It’s amazing how many birds are out on the water that’s still open.”

Winter waterfowl surveys can help detect any significant changes in the populations as well as help determine results of recent waterfowl hunting seasons and help dictate further regulations for future seasons. The January waterfowl survey also provides the best information on the number of mute swans in Michigan so population trends can be established for yearly comparisons.

To learn more about the different wildlife surveys completed by the DNR, visit the Wildlife Surveys page on the DNR website or contact DNR wildlife outreach technician Katie Keen at 231-775-9727.

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Cougar illegally killed in UP


 

Michigan Department of Natural Resources law enforcement officials have confirmed a cougar was illegally killed last week in the Upper Peninsula’s Schoolcraft County.

Acting on a tip that a cougar had been illegally killed at a hunting camp in northeast Schoolcraft County, DNR conservation officers and Special Investigations Unit detectives were able to successfully recover evidence and identify and apprehend two suspects from Bay County.

Upon completion of the DNR’s investigation, the case will be turned over to the Schoolcraft County Prosecuting Attorney with warrant requests for charges. The state penalty for illegally killing a cougar, classified as an endangered species in Michigan, is up to 90 days in jail and fines and restitution of up to $2,500.

Anyone with information about this or any other poaching case is encouraged to call the DNR’s Report All Poaching (RAP) hotline at 800-292-7800, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Information can also be reported online at www.michigan.gov/conservationofficers. Tips and information can be left anonymously; information that leads to an arrest and conviction is eligible for a cash reward funded by the state’s Game and Fish Protection Fund.

A trail camera photo of a cougar near the same area as this incident was recently confirmed by the DNR’s Wildlife Division. Wildlife officials believe the animal killed was most likely the same cougar seen in the recent photo.

Cougars, also known as mountain lions, disappeared from the state in the early 1900s. The last confirmed wild cougar in Michigan prior to 2008 was an animal killed near Newberry in 1906.

Since 2008, the DNR has confirmed photos or tracks of cougars on 23 occasions in 10 Upper Peninsula counties. The animals are believed to be young individuals dispersing from established populations in the Dakotas in search of new territory. There is no evidence of a breeding population of cougars in the state.

The Wildlife Division’s specially trained cougar team welcomes citizen reports of possible cougar evidence or sightings. Cougar photos and other evidence, such as tracks, scat or cached kills, should be reported to a local DNR office or through the DNR’s online reporting form at www.michigan.gov/cougars.

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Bear DNA does not match bear that attacked girl


A black bear that was shot and killed last week is not the same bear that attacked a 12-year-old girl.

A black bear that was shot and killed last week is not the same bear that attacked a 12-year-old girl.

The DNA of a wounded bear killed Aug. 18 by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources does not match the DNA of the bear that attacked 12-year-old Abby Wetherell near Cadillac, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR) announced. The bear’s carcass was examined by the DNR Wildlife Disease Laboratory in Lansing, in cooperation with Michigan State University and the Michigan State Police. Tests were conducted for disease, and the bear’s DNA was extracted. The bear DNA was then checked against DNA from fur and saliva lifted from Abby’s clothing and from the scene of the attack. The tests showed that the bear that attacked Abby was a female. The bear that was killed was a male.

The DNR will extend trapping efforts in the area of the attack through the end of the week and will continue to monitor bear activity in that location. The DNR asks the public to report bear sightings in the area of the attack, which is in Wexford County’s Haring Township. Reports can be made to the DNR’s Report All Poaching (RAP) Hotline, 800-292-7800, or the department’s Cadillac Operations Service Center at (231) 775-9727. The black bear is a protected species under Michigan law. The public is reminded not to shoot a bear unless the animal poses an immediate threat.  Bears are a natural part of the landscape within this area and their presence should not be seen as a threat.

The bear tested by the DNR was the result of a complaint received at about 11:30 p.m. Aug. 17 in Wexford County’s Selma Township. Michigan conservation officers arrived on the scene to find that a man had wounded the bear by gunshot on his property because he perceived the bear to be a threat to his life. Conservation officers subsequently tracked the bear and shot the animal at approximately 2:45 a.m. Aug. 18. The bear was not killed because it was suspected of being involved in the Aug. 15 attack on Abby. Once the animal was discovered, however, the bear was tested for a possible relationship to the attack because it was within about 2 miles of the attack location.

Michigan has an estimated black bear population of 8,000 to 10,000 bears with 90 percent of the population in the Upper Peninsula. The DNR reminds the public that black bears are generally fearful of humans and will usually leave if they become aware that people are present. Black bear attacks on humans are highly unusual. Many bear attacks occur because a sow is protecting her cubs. However, there is no evidence that cubs were present at the scene of the attack on Abby.

The DNR reminds those living in an area where bears may be present:

  • Travel in small groups and make noise to avoid surprising bears.
  • Stand your ground and then slowly back away if you encounter a bear. Do not turn away. Do not show fear and run. Do not play dead.
  • Make yourself look bigger and talk to the bear in a stern voice.
  • Fight back if actually attacked with anything at hand — a backpack, a stick, bare hands.
  • Carry pepper spray, which has been shown to be effective in fending off bear attacks.

For additional information on living with bears, visit the DNR website at www.michigan.gov/bear.

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