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Tag Archive | "Michigan Department of Natural Resources"

New reservation policy at state parks


 

Will give more campers better opportunities at sites 

A new DNR camping reservation policy that will help make it easier for more people to secure campsites in Michigan state parks further in advance, takes effect Nov. 1. Camping reservations can be booked up to six months ahead of time at www.midnrreservations.com.

In an effort to make it easier for more people to have a chance at securing campsites at many of the state’s most-visited parks, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources has put in place a new policy that encourages people to firm up their reservations further in advance of their planned camping dates. The new sliding modification and cancellation structure takes effect Nov. 1.

Campers still can make reservations up to six months in advance. Under the current policy, the cost to cancel or modify a camping reservation is $10. The new structure still will include the $10 modification and cancellation fee, but also will include an additional incremental fee based on the length of time between the date the initial reservation was made and the planned arrival date. That incremental fee will be determined by the length of time a reservation is held:

*Reservations held for up to two months: 10 percent of the nightly rate for each modified/canceled camp night.

*Reservations held for between two to three months: 15 percent of the nightly rate for each modified/canceled camp night.

*Reservations held for between three and four months: 20 percent of the nightly rate for each modified/canceled camp night.

*Reservations held for between four and five months: 30 percent of the nightly rate for each modified/canceled camp night.

*Reservations held longer than five months: 40 percent of the nightly rate for each modified/canceled camp night.

Note: There will not be a fee to modify a reservation that adds camp nights.

Rather than holding onto several blocks of campsites at a campground – or in some cases, multiple campgrounds – the new policy incentivizes campers to finalize their plans as soon as possible.

“We are updating the current policy to encourage campers with reservations to make any necessary changes to their travel plans much earlier in the process, which opens up more sites for others who currently may experience difficulty finding space at our more popular campgrounds,” said Ron Olson, DNR Parks and Recreation Division chief. “Rather than waiting for cancellations that may or may not happen close to their own desired travel dates, more campers will find that the new reservation policy will give them access to a variety of sites much earlier.”

For more information on camping opportunities and pricing, visit  www.michigan.gov/camping. Camping reservations can be booked up to six months in advance at Michigan state parks. Campers are encouraged to visit  www.midnrreservations.com or call 1-800-44PARKS (1-800-447-2757) to check on availability. Remaining camping spots are available on a first-come, first-served basis.

For more information, contact Jason Fleming, chief of the Resource Management Section in the DNR Parks and Recreation Division, at 517-284-6098 or flemingj@michigan.gov.

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Another Montcalm deer suspected to have CWD


The Michigan Department of Natural Resources announced on Tuesday, October 24, that a second hunter-harvested deer in Montcalm County is suspected positive for chronic wasting disease. A sample has been sent to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, for confirmation. If confirmed positive, the 1.5-year-old buck, harvested in Sidney Township, would be the 11th free-ranging deer in Michigan found to have CWD.

“The fact that we already have another positive deer within Montcalm County is of major concern,” said Dr. Kelly Straka, DNR state wildlife veterinarian. “We strongly recommend hunters who harvest deer in Montcalm County have their deer tested. Deer with CWD can look perfectly healthy even though they are infected.”

To date, there have been no reported cases of CWD infection in humans. However, as a precaution, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization recommend that infected animals not be consumed as food by either humans or domestic animals. 

Since May 2015 when the first CWD deer was found, the DNR has tested more than 15,000 deer. Thus far, 10 cases of CWD have been confirmed in free-ranging white-tailed deer from Clinton, Ingham and Montcalm counties.

As additional deer have tested positive for CWD within Michigan, the DNR has put specific regulations in place. This deer was harvested in the Montcalm-Kent Core CWD Area, which includes Maple Valley, Pine, Douglass, Montcalm, Sidney, Eureka, and Fairplain townships in Montcalm County; and Spencer and Oakfield townships in Kent County. Starting Nov. 15, this nine-township area will have mandatory deer check.

As announced previously, the DNR will hold a town hall meeting Wednesday, Oct. 25, 6 to 8 p.m. in the Ash Foundation Building, located within the Montcalm County Fairgrounds at 8784 Peck Road in Greenville, Michigan.

At the meeting, Dr. Straka and DNR deer specialist Chad Stewart will provide information on chronic wasting disease, its effects on deer and deer populations, and DNR actions to date in responding to the discovery of the disease. Dr. Cheryl Collins, veterinarian from the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, will be present to provide information and answer questions related to farmed deer.

Chronic wasting disease is a fatal neurological disease that affects white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk and moose. It is caused by the transmission of infectious, self-multiplying proteins (prions) contained in saliva and other body fluids of infected animals. Susceptible animals can acquire CWD by direct exposure to these fluids, from environments contaminated with these fluids, or from the carcass of a diseased animal. 

Some CWD-infected animals will display abnormal behaviors, progressive weight loss and physical debilitation; however, deer can be infected for many years without showing internal or external symptoms. There is no cure; once a deer is infected with CWD, it will die. 

To learn more about CWD, visit mi.gov/cwd

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A great time to discover your next outdoor adventure


Michigan offers more than 1,800 miles of designated biking trails across the state. This group of riders is in Grand Traverse County on a variety of types of bikes. Trails Week is a great time to get out and enjoy a ride along the bike trails.

Michigan Trails Week, Sept. 23-30

When it comes to trails, there’s no place like Michigan. With trails that cater to a variety of passions—from biking, hiking and snowmobiling to off-roading, paddling and horseback riding—Michigan has a trail for you. Michigan Trails Week, Sept. 23-30, is the perfect time to hit the trails for the first time or try your hand (or feet) at a new trail adventure.

“If you want to get out and really enjoy the great outdoors, Michigan is the place to be,” said Paul Yauk, statewide trails coordinator for the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. “Our trails take you to every corner of the state, with stops at some of the most picturesque locations in the country, a number of fascinating historical sites and attractions, and more than 100 state parks.”

Michigan has more than 12,500 miles of designated state trails that connect communities and provide real health and economic benefits. No matter where in Michigan you are, chances are you can find hiking and biking trails, equestrian trails, snowmobile trails, off-road vehicle trails and even water trails that will link you to many areas of the state.

In his proclamation declaring this year’s Michigan Trails Week, Gov. Rick Snyder cited “Michigan’s rich network of trails throughout the Upper and Lower peninsulas” that “provide residents and visitors with scenic spaces in which to explore nature, appreciate wildlife, experience solitude or enjoy time with family and friends.”

Those are pretty good reasons why Michigan is cementing its reputation as The Trails State, said Yauk. Michigan also offers:

*The Iron Belle Trail, the longest designated state trail in the nation, is a 2,000-mile journey winding from Ironwood in the western Upper Peninsula to Belle Isle in Detroit, crisscrossing more than half of Michigan’s counties along both hiking and biking routes. Michigan’s Iron Belle Trail showcases many of the state’s natural and cultural resources, from national lakeshores to historic industrial areas.

*Thousands of miles of ORV trails that are constantly being upgraded through funding generated by the sale of ORV licenses and trail permits. These dollars help fund the restoration of many existing trails and the ability to link more communities across the state.

*The largest statewide rail-trail system in the nation, with more than 2,600 miles of old railroad lines that have been converted for recreational use.

*Thousands of miles of equestrian, snowmobile and water trail opportunities throughout the state, strengthening Michigan’s position as the nation’s Trails State.

The DNR again is partnering with the Michigan Trails and Greenways Alliance, the Michigan Recreation and Park Association, and communities throughout the state to offer trails information and opportunities during Michigan Trails Week and all year long.

Michigan Trails Week concludes Saturday, Sept. 30, which is National Public Lands Day, traditionally a day for volunteer-led efforts to beautify and build awareness about the value and breadth of U.S. public lands. In fact, more than 30 percent of America’s land is public.

For more information about Michigan’s trails system and Michigan Trails Week opportunities, community resources and events throughout the state, visit the DNR website at www.michigan.gov/trailsweek.

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Living Resources patches available for purchase 


 

The 2016-2017 Michigan’s Living Resources patch featuring the American robin, along with several patches from previous years, will be available for purchase through the end of September.

Through end of September

The 2016-2017 Michigan’s Living Resources patch featuring the American robin, along with several patches from previous years, will be available for purchase on the Michigan e-store at https://media.state.mi.us/MichiganeStore/public/Home.aspx through the end of September. (Go to the home page, then click on Patches, Mugs, and t-shirts.)

The Living Resources patch program has raised awareness of Michigan’s nongame species for over 40 years, with the first Living Resources patch issued in 1975 featuring the Kirtland’s warbler.

Proceeds from the sale of these patches goes into the Nongame Fish and Wildlife Fund, which provides a source of funding for projects vital to the needs of Michigan’s endangered, threatened and nongame animals, plants and their habitats.

Funds for these important management efforts also have been raised through voluntary check-off contributions on the state income tax form, sales of the wildlife habitat specialty license plate and direct donations.

Today, those interested in contributing can support the fund through purchase of a wildlife habitat license plate, making a tax-deductible donation or purchasing a patch.

Those who would like to request a mail-in order form can contact the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Division at 517-284-WILD (9453).

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Winners of tree-planting grants announced


 

$70,110 awarded to Michigan communities

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources, DTE Energy Foundation and ReLeaf Michigan announce the award of $70,110 to 29 organizations in Michigan to plant 750 trees along community streets, in parks and other public spaces.

In our area, both the Village of Sparta and the Sparta Recreation Authority each received a grant of $3,000.

This tree-planting grant program is sponsored by the DTE Energy Foundation in partnership with the DNR and ReLeaf Michigan as part of a long-standing commitment to improving communities and the environment throughout the state.

“These trees will help improve community quality of life and the environment through beautification, cleaning the air, increasing tree canopy to produce cooling shade, and providing habitat for wildlife,” said Kevin Sayers, DNR Urban and Community Forestry program coordinator.

The tree-planting grants are part of a long-term initiative to partner with communities, schools and nonprofits on programs to take care of the environment, noted Faye Nelson, vice president of DTE Energy and board chair and president of the DTE Energy Foundation.

“The DTE Energy Foundation has always believed it is our responsibility to sustain and protect Michigan’s legacy—from  its cultural institutions to its beautiful natural environment—and to help build its future,” Nelson said. “As good environmental stewards, we are proud to support the 2017 tree-planting program and partner with the DNR to invest in the future of our state by ensuring these spaces are enjoyed for generations to come.”

Grants awarded under this program will be used to help purchase trees of various species and sizes to be planted this fall or next spring.

ReLeaf Michigan, a nonprofit organization, works closely with communities statewide to replenish tree canopies through volunteer tree-planting events. Communities interested in coordinating local volunteer tree-planting or educational events are encouraged to contact ReLeaf Michigan to find out how they can assist. Call, email or visit them online at 1-800-642-7353, info@releafmichigan.org, or  www.releafmichigan.org.

For more information or a list of approved grants contact Kevin Sayers at 517-284-5898 or visit the program website at www.mi.gov/ucf. For additional information about the DTE Energy Foundation, please contact Anne O’Dell at 313-235-5555.

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Enjoy Meteors & S’mores during Perseid meteor shower


Michigan state parks offer great natural spaces for gathering with friends and family and enjoying a variety of special events, like Meteors & S’mores and other seasonal programming that takes advantage of each park’s natural amenities.

At state parks Aug. 11-12

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources invites visitors and campers to catch a view of the Perseid meteor shower during “Meteors & S’mores” in participating Michigan state parks Aug. 11-12.

Day-use visitors and campers at participating state parks are encouraged to bring blankets, seating, bug spray and snacks and enjoy a night of stargazing.

Participating parks will stay open later than their normal closing times. Complimentary s’mores and campfires are part of the celebration. Designated viewing areas and viewing times will be specified at each park.

“Many consider themselves lucky if they catch a shooting star, but the Perseid meteor shower is one of the best opportunities to see them with the naked eye,” said Elissa Buck, a DNR event coordinator. “We encourage those who want to catch magnificent views with fellow parkgoers take part in one of these Meteors & S’mores events.”

The calendar of events can be found online at michigan.gov/darksky and also is listed below.

South Higgins Lake State Park (Roscommon County) Friday, Aug. 11, 9 to 11 p.m.

Muskegon State Park (Muskegon County) Friday, Aug. 11, 9 to 11:30 p.m.

Lakeport State Park (St. Clair County) Friday, Aug. 11, 9:30 to 10:30 p.m.

Island Lake Recreation Area (Livingston County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 8 to 11 p.m.

Fort Wilkins State Park (Keweenaw County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 8 to 11:45 p.m.

North Higgins Lake State Park (Roscommon County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 9 to 10:30 p.m.

Leelanau State Park (Leelanau County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 9 to 10:30 p.m.

Young State Park (Charlevoix County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 9 to 11 p.m.

Clear Lake State Park (Montmorency County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 9 to 11:30 p.m.

Wilderness State Park (Emmet County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 9 to 11:30 p.m.

Van Buren State Park (Van Buren County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 9 to 11:45 p.m.

Warren Dunes State Park (Berrien County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 9 p.m. to midnight

Van Riper State Park (Marquette County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 9:30 to 10:30 p.m.

Holland State Park (Ottawa County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 10 to 11 p.m.

Indian Lake State Park (Delta County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 10 to 11:30 p.m.

Bald Mountain Recreation Area (Oakland County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 10 to 11:30 p.m.

Seven Lakes State Park (Oakland County) Saturday, Aug. 12, 10 to 11:45 p.m.

Negwegon State Park (Alcona and Alpena counties) Saturday, Aug. 12, 9 to 11 p.m.

About Dark Sky parks in Michigan

Dark Sky Preserves are protected against light pollution and are ideal locations for stargazing. Here in Michigan, six state-designated Dark Sky Preserves are located at Lake Hudson Recreation Area, Negwegon State Park, Port Crescent State Park, Rockport Recreation Area, Thompson’s Harbor State Park and Wilderness State Park. In addition, Michigan’s Upper Peninsula offers excellent night sky viewing opportunities across more than 15,000 square miles. Learn more at michigan.gov/darksky.

Camp under the stars

To take full advantage of the meteor showers that are estimated to take place Aug. 9-16, visitors are encouraged to make camping reservations throughout the week and sleep under the stars. To check camping availability in state parks and make a reservation, visit www.midnrreservations.com or call 1-800-44PARKS.

For more information about these events, contact Elissa Buck at bucke@michigan.gov or 989-313-0000.

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It’s best to leave snakes be


 

The only venomous snake species found in Michigan, the rare eastern massasauga rattlesnake is shy and avoids humans whenever possible.

Michigan is home to 18 different species of snakes, 17 of which are harmless to humans

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources gets many questions this time of year about Michigan’s snakes. Eighteen different species of snake call Michigan home, but only one of them poses any real harm to humans.

“Whether you think snakes are terrifying or totally cool, it is best just to leave them be,” said Hannah Schauer, wildlife communications coordinator for the DNR.

The snake the DNR gets the most questions about is the eastern massasauga rattlesnake, the only venomous species found in Michigan. This snake rarely is seen and is listed as a threatened species by the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service due to declining populations from habitat loss. As its name implies, the massasauga rattlesnake does have a segmented rattle on its tail. It should not be confused with the other, harmless species of snake in Michigan that do not have segmented rattles but will buzz their tails if approached or handled.

“The massasauga rattlesnake tends to be a very shy snake that will avoid humans whenever possible,” said Schauer. “They spend the vast majority of their time in wetlands hunting for mice and aren’t often encountered.”

Schauer said that when a massasauga is encountered, if the snake doesn’t feel threatened it will let people pass without revealing its location.

“If you do get too close without realizing it, a rattlesnake will generally warn you of its presence by rattling its tail while you are still several feet away,” Schauer said. “If given room, the snake will slither away and likely will not be seen again.”

Rattlesnake bites, while extremely rare in Michigan, can and do occur. Anyone who is bitten should seek professional medical attention.

Another snake that can cause quite a stir is the eastern hog-nosed snake, one of the many harmless species found in Michigan. When threatened, hognose snakes puff up with air, flatten their necks and bodies, and hiss loudly. This has led to local names like “puff adder” or “hissing viper.” If this act is unsuccessful, they will writhe about, excrete a foul-smelling musk and then turn over with mouth agape and lie still, as though dead. Despite this intimidating behavior, hog-nosed snakes do not pose a threat to humans.

Michigan snakes do not attack, chase or lunge at people or seek out human contact. If you have spotted a snake, stay at least 3 feet away from the head to avoid getting bit. Handling or harassing snakes is the most common cause for humans getting bit. Simply put, if left alone, Michigan snakes will leave people alone.

To find out what other kinds of snakes Michigan has and how to tell the difference between them, check out the “60-Second Snakes” video series on the DNR’s YouTube channel.

Learn more about Michigan’s snakes by visiting mi.gov/wildlife and clicking on the “Wildlife Species” button, then selecting “Amphibians and Reptiles.”

Please consider reporting any reptile or amphibian sightings to the Michigan Herp Atlas research project to help monitor amphibian and reptile populations in the state and protect these important Michigan residents for future generations. Visit www.miherpatlas.org for more information.

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Community tree-planting grants


 

The DTE Energy Foundation and the Michigan Department of Natural Resources are partnering to fund tree-planting projects across Michigan. New this year, ReLeaf Michigan, a statewide nonprofit tree-planting organization, also is joining the effort. A total of $70,000 is available in matching grants of up to $3,000 each, to be awarded on a competitive basis. The 2017 DTE Tree Planting grant application period opens today, April 28, in honor of Arbor Day.

This marks the 21st year of the DTE Energy Foundation partnership with the DNR, which has resulted in the planting of nearly 40,000 trees and seedlings in over 500 communities. The program, paid for by the foundation, is administered by the DNR’s Urban and Community Forestry program. With the addition this year of ReLeaf Michigan, this collaborative partnership will help increase opportunities for community involvement and outreach.

“Arbor Day is an opportunity to celebrate our longstanding commitment to taking care of the environment and the many ways that we help enhance and protect Michigan’s natural beauty,” said Faye Nelson, vice president at DTE Energy and board chair and president of the DTE Energy Foundation. “This partnership with the Department of Natural Resources and ReLeaf Michigan is an environmental investment in local communities.”

Local units of government, nonprofit organizations, tribes and schools within DTE Energy’s service territory are encouraged to apply. Tree-planting projects must occur on public property such as parks, street rights-of-way and school grounds. All grants require a 1-to-1 match, which can be made up of cash contributions or in-kind services, but may not include federal funds.

Grant applications must be sent to the address below and postmarked by Friday, June 9, 2017. Awards will be announced in August for projects that must be completed by May 31, 2018.

For more information or to get a grant application, visit the DNR’s Urban Community Forestry website or contact Kevin Sayers at 517-284-5898, via email at sayersk@michigan.gov or by mail at P.O. Box 30452 Lansing, MI 48909.

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Michigan fire season builds during Wildfire Prevention Week


The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is using Wildfire Prevention Week (April 16-22) to remind people to go to to check if burn permits are being issued in their area before burning any yard debris.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is using Wildfire Prevention Week (April 16-22) to remind people to go to to check if burn permits are being issued in their area before burning any yard debris.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources and its cooperators are observing Wildfire Prevention Week April 16-22. Most wildfires on Michigan’s 20 million acres of state and private forest land occur in April, May and June.

“Michigan typically experiences some of its higher fire conditions during the spring,” said Bryce Avery, DNR fire prevention specialist. “The dead grass and leaves from last year dry very quickly as days become longer, temperatures begin to rise, and humidity levels are often at their lowest points. Breezy conditions increase the danger, but even on calm days, one ember landing in some dead grass is enough to start a wildfire.”

Warm spring weather increases the amount of outdoor activities, like yard cleanup, campfires and fireworks. All of these activities require planning and caution before and after fires are lit.

“To dispose of yard waste, consider composting, but if you are planning on burning yard debris, your first step should be to check if the DNR is issuing burn permits in your area,” said Avery.

Burn permits are required prior to burning brush and debris in Michigan when the ground is not snow-covered. Residents in the northern Lower Peninsula and Upper Peninsula can obtain a free burn permit by visiting  www.michigan.gov/burnpermit or by calling 866-922-2876. Residents in southern Michigan should contact their local fire department or township office to see if burning is permitted in their area.

In addition to obtaining a burn permit, the DNR recommends people take the following steps to help prevent wildfires:

  • Pay attention to the fire danger in your area. Don’t burn debris when conditions are dry or windy. Unsafe burning of leaves, brush and other debris is the main cause of wildfires.
  • Clear away flammable material surrounding the fire so it won’t creep into dry vegetation.
  • Keep campfires small, and do not leave before they are fully extinguished.
  • Have a shovel and water available at all times when you are burning. Be sure to douse fires with plenty of water, stir and add more water until everything is wet.
  • Do not cover a campfire with soil; it may simply smolder before coming back to life.
  • Embers can re-ignite. Make sure they are out completely.
  • Consider composting or mulching yard debris rather than burning it.

Historically, debris burning has been the No. 1 cause of wildfires in Michigan.

For more tips in safeguarding your home and property from wildfire risk, please visit www.michigan.gov/preventwildfires.

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Experience the excitement of spring birding 


scarlet tanagers are among the many bird species that can be found on Michigan’s birding trails

Scarlet tanagers are among the many bird species that can be found on Michigan’s birding trails

Common yellowthroats are among the many bird species that will be celebrated with birding events around the state this spring.

Common yellowthroats are among the many bird species that will be celebrated with birding events around the state this spring.

Events, trails around the state 

Michigan is home to a variety of important bird habitats and an exciting array of public birding events and birding trails. Now is the time to start making plans to get out and enjoy the spectacular diversity of birds in Michigan.

“Michigan has so many great opportunities for birders and wildlife watchers, with more events popping up all the time,” said Holly Vaughn, Department of Natural Resources wildlife communications coordinator. “There is no better place to begin birding than Michigan, and there are opportunities to observe birds anywhere you may be in the state.”

In addition to the many festivals listed below, Michigan is home to a growing number of birding trails, with six already existing and more planned. Michigan’s birding trails are open to the public and provide great opportunities for family recreation.

Spring birding events in Michigan include:

APRIL

  • Mackinaw Raptor Fest in Mackinaw City, April 7-9
  • Spring Fling at Whitefish Point Bird Observatory in Paradise, April 29-30
  • Thornapple Woodpecker Festival in Middleville, April 29
  • Brockway Mountain Hawk Watch in Copper Harbor, now through June 15

MAY

  • Keweenaw Migratory Bird Festival in Copper Harbor, May 20
  • Ziibiwing Annual Bird Celebration in Mt. Pleasant, May 13
  • Tawas Point Birding Festival in East Tawas, May 18-20
  • Warblers on the Water on Beaver Island, May 27-28
  • Kirtland’s Warbler Tours at Hartwick Pines State Park in Grayling, May 14 through July 4

JUNE

  • Kirtland’s Warbler Festival in Roscommon, June 2-3
  • Cerulean Warbler Weekend in Hastings, June 10-11
  • Keweenaw Migratory Bird Festival in Copper Harbor, June 3, 10 and 11

“These birding events contribute significantly to the local economies, and attract attention to the value of local birds and habitats,” said Caleb Putnam, Michigan bird conservation coordinator for Audubon Great Lakes and the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. “As birders from across the country converge on Michigan’s diverse habitats, the energy continues to grow for conservation in Michigan.”

Birding is a great way to enjoy the diversity of Michigan’s wildlife and their habitats and to build a true appreciation for the uniqueness of the state’s natural resources. Birding events and trails are made possible through the efforts of Audubon chapters, government agencies, land conservancies, private industries and many dedicated individuals working together to create opportunities for people to experience the outdoors and visit local communities.

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