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Tag Archive | "Michigan Department of Health and Human Services"

MDHHS reporting an  increase in pertussis, recommends vaccination


HEA-Pertussis

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services is supporting the Oakland County Health Division following an increase in the number of identified pertussis cases, commonly referred to as whooping cough.

“Pertussis is a contagious disease that easily spreads between people and can be difficult to diagnose,” said Dr. Eden Wells, chief medical executive for the MDHHS. “We support the proactive efforts of the Oakland County Health Division in ensuring residents are aware of this increase and the steps they can take to protect themselves and their children.”

Anyone exposed to pertussis and displaying symptoms should be evaluated by a doctor to determine if antibiotics are needed. Infants younger than 12 months are at greatest risk. Infants and children who have not been fully vaccinated against pertussis are at a higher risk of developing severe illness. To be fully immunized, doses are given at 2, 4, 6, and 15 months. The last dose is given at 4 years old.

Pertussis is a very contagious disease that usually starts with cold-like symptoms and maybe a mild cough or fever. After 1 to 2 weeks, severe coughing can begin. Pertussis can cause violent and rapid coughing, over and over, until the air is gone from the lungs and people are forced to inhale with a loud “whooping” sound. In infants, the cough can be minimal or not even there. Other symptoms include:

  • Runny nose
  • Nasal congestion
  • Sneezing
  • Red, watery eyes
  • Mild fever
  • Dry cough
  • Vomiting after coughing fits

People infected with pertussis can spread the disease by coughing or sneezing in close contact with others who breathe in the bacteria. Pertussis is most contagious during the first two weeks of illness.

Infants are at highest risk of severe disease and death; older siblings and adults often are the source.

Infants and children should receive pertussis vaccine series (DTaP) as per the U.S. recommended childhood immunization schedule. All doses should be given as close to the recommended ages as possible. A pertussis vaccine booster dose (Tdap) is recommended for adolescents and adults, and is especially important for those in contact with infants. Current recommendations call for a single lifetime Tdap booster dose with the following exception: a dose of Tdap is recommended for pregnant females in each pregnancy between weeks 27 and 36.

For more information about pertussis, visit www.cdc.gov/pertussis.

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Provide safe sleep apace for baby during holiday travel 


Be sure to have a safe place for your baby to sleep when traveling. An adult bed, like this one, is not safe.

Be sure to have a safe place for your baby to sleep when traveling. An adult bed, like this one, is not safe.

The holidays are a busy time of year, often spent traveling away from home. For families with babies, travel can be especially hectic when trying to remember all of the necessities. One item to put at the top of your list is a safe space for baby to sleep when you’re away from home.

To protect babies this holiday season, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) is reminding parents and caregivers to plan ahead and make sure there is always a safe space for baby to sleep—an approved crib, bassinet or pack and play.

“It’s important that everyone caring for the baby, including grandparents, siblings, aunts and uncles, knows how to put a baby to sleep safely. If everyone knows the simple steps to safe sleep, we can all do our part in preventing an infant death,” said MDHHS Director Nick Lyon.

Tragically, a baby dies nearly every other day in Michigan while sleeping in an adult bed, armchair or couch; with pillows or blankets; or with adults or other children. These deaths are 100 percent preventable with a safe sleep environment.

Michigan families are encouraged to follow these tips for safe sleep during every nap and nighttime routine:

  • Place your baby on their back, in a crib, bassinet or pack and play, with nothing else in their sleep environment.
  • Plan ahead and take a portable crib with you when traveling.
  • Use a firm mattress with a tightly fitted sheet.
  • Keep baby’s sleep space clutter free—no pillows, blankets or toys.
  • Avoid covering baby’s head or overheating. Instead of a blanket, consider using a sleepsack, wearable blanket or footed sleeper to keep baby warm.
  • Remind everyone who cares for your baby, including babysitters and family members, how to keep baby safe while sleeping.

You can make sure every baby is sleeping safe this holiday season. Learn more at www.michigan.gov/safesleep.

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Two food service facilities impacted by nationwide strawberry recall 


 

Recently, the Kent County Health Department was alerted by the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development and Michigan Department of Health and Human Services regarding an ongoing recall of frozen strawberries sold to certain commercial food service establishments. These strawberries are believed to be connected to a Hepatitis A outbreak nationwide. Because these strawberries may have been consumed over the past few months, there are two very important concerns for Health Department staff: the risk of people becoming ill with Hepatitis A, and vaccinating those who may have been exposed before they become ill. Treatment is available for those exposed in the past 14 days. In Kent County, two facilities have served strawberries from the suspected lots in the last two weeks: Romano’s Macaroni Grill, 5525 28th Street, Grand Rapids, MI 49512 (near I-96) and HCR ManorCare Grand Rapids, 2320 E Beltline SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49546

“If you have eaten an item containing strawberries at Macaroni Grill or HRC ManorCare on the Beltline in the last 14 days, you should receive either the Hepatitis A vaccination as soon as possible to try to prevent the illness,” said Adam London, Kent County Health Department Administrative Health Officer. “The immunization is only effective up to 14 days after exposure, so it is important to contact your health care provider while you are in the 14 day window. If it has been longer than 14 days, you should be aware of the symptoms of Hepatitis A and if you become ill, contact your health care provider.”

Hepatitis A is a highly contagious liver infection that can be spread by eating contaminated food. “If someone has the virus, it is possible for them to transmit the illness to others, especially through food preparation,” London added. “As with many viral illnesses, personal hygiene and good handwashing can help prevent the illness from spreading.” Symptoms include:

. Jaundice (a yellowing of the skin or eyes)

. Dark urine

. Fever

. Fatigue

. Loss of appetite

. Nausea

. Vomiting

. Abdominal pain

. Clay-colored bowel movements

The Health Department urges individuals who need vaccination to do so as soon as possible. This chart explains the timeline for those who may have been exposed to receive vaccination:

If you ate strawberries at Macaroni Grill October 21-26, the window to get the vaccination has closed. If you ate them Thursday, October 27, then Thursday, November 10 is the last day you can receive the vaccination; and if you ate them on Friday, October 28, then Friday, November 11 is the last day you can receive the vaccination.

If you ate strawberries at HCR on October 24, the window to get the vaccination is closed. They did not serve them the other dates.

In case you have been traveling within Michigan, there is a complete list of restaurants statewide that may have served the recalled frozen strawberries in recent weeks at www.michigan.gov/documents/mdard/Hep_A_List_of_Known_and_Possible_Locations_11042016_1310_540528_7.pdf.

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First human case of West Nile virus for 2016 confirmed in MI


HEA-WestNile-mosquito

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) confirmed on July 22 the state’s first human case of West Nile virus (WNV) for 2016. The resident is an older adult from Livingston County and is currently recovering.

“Hot, dry summers are ideal for the mosquito that transmits West Nile virus, and this case is an important reminder to stay vigilant against mosquito bites throughout the summer,” said Dr. Eden Wells, Chief Medical Executive at the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services. “All residents older than six months of age should use repellent and take extra care during peak mosquito-biting hours between dusk and dawn.”

To date, 13 birds have tested positive for WNV so far this season, and 3 WNV positive mosquito pools have been detected in Oakland and Saginaw counties. Infected birds and mosquitoes can provide an early warning of WNV activity in a community. For the most current information on mosquito-borne virus activity in Michigan, visit www.michigan.gov/westnilevirus.

Residents can stay healthy by using simple, effective strategies to protect themselves and their families by reading and following all repellant label directions. The following steps are recommended to avoid WNV:

  • Maintain window and door screening to help keep mosquitoes outside.
  • Empty water from mosquito breeding sites around the home, such as buckets, unused kiddie pools, old tires or similar sites where mosquitoes lay eggs.
  • Use nets and/or fans over outdoor eating areas.
  • Apply insect repellents that contain the active ingredient DEET, or other EPA approved product to exposed skin or clothing, and always following the manufacturer’s directions for use.
  • Wear light colored, long-sleeved shirts and long pants when outdoors. Apply insect repellent to clothing to help prevent bites.

Most people who become infected with West Nile virus will not develop any symptoms of illness. However, some become sick three to 15 days after exposure. About one-in-five infected persons will have mild illness with fever, and about one in 150 infected people will become severely ill.

Mild illness may include headache, body aches, joint pain, vomiting diarrhea, or rash. Severe symptoms of WNV are associated with encephalitis or meningitis, and may include: include stiff neck, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, muscle weakness, convulsions and paralysis. People 50 and older are more susceptible to severe WNV disease symptoms.

For more information and surveillance activity about WNV, visit www.michigan.gov/westnilevirus.

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Salmonella infections linked to exposure to live poultry 


N-Salmonella-Spring-chicksThe Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) is reporting an increase in Salmonella infections, or salmonellosis, among people who have had contact with live baby poultry. Since March 2, 2016, there have been 20 cases of salmonellosis with live chick or duckling exposure reported throughout the state; these numbers are expected to rise. Six individuals (30 percent) were hospitalized and the reported cases are associated with individuals ranging from younger than 12 months to 70 years of age.

“While raising baby chicks and having fresh eggs can be fun and educational, poultry owners should be aware that chickens and other birds can carry germs that can impact human health,” said Dr. Eden Wells, MDHHS chief medical executive.

Symptoms of salmonellosis include diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and abdominal cramps. Sometimes a severe infection occurs and the person needs to be hospitalized. Salmonella can spread from the intestines to the bloodstream and other body sites and can cause death unless the person is treated promptly with antibiotics.

“Live baby poultry can carry Salmonella and still look healthy. Poultry do not get sick like people do from the bacteria,” said Dr. James Averill, state veterinarian, Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development. “This is why it’s so important for people handling baby chicks and poultry to practice good personal biosecurity such as handwashing because the bacteria may be present.”

Local health departments (LHDs) are playing a critical role in this outbreak investigation. Investigators from several LHDs with salmonellosis cases have visited the feed and farm stores to collect environmental samples for testing in jurisdictions where ill residents purchased baby poultry. These environmental samples have been tested at the MDHHS Bureau of Laboratories and a number of samples are positive for Salmonella; some of which match the outbreak strain. Testing and a traceback investigation are still in process. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been notified.

People become infected with Salmonella when they handle young poultry or their cages and coops. Germs can be found on the hands, shoes, and clothing of those who handle the birds or work or play in areas where the birds live and roam. Young children are especially at risk for illness because their immune systems are still developing.

Here are some important actions you and your family can take to protect yourselves from a Salmonella infection:

  • Wash hands vigorously with soap and water immediately after touching poultry or anything in their environment, such as cages, coops, or bedding.
  • Adults should supervise hand washing for young children after they have held baby poultry or touched anything in the bird’s environment.
  • Live poultry should be kept in their own place outside the home.
  • The CDC recommends children under the age of five, older adults, or people who are immune compromised should not handle or touch chicks, ducklings, or other live poultry.

If you suspect that you or your child has a Salmonella infection, contact your doctor or healthcare provider immediately.

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Michigan investigating multistate outbreak of listeriosis


 

Some Dole salads being recalled

N-Dole-salad-recallLANSING, Mich. – The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services has been collaborating with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, and local health departments in Michigan on a multistate foodborne outbreak of listeriosis, including four cases and one death in Michigan.

Twelve people in six states have been infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria monocytogenes since July 5, 2015, including Indiana (1), Massachusetts (1), Michigan (4), New Jersey (1), New York (4), and Pennsylvania (1). Ill people range in age from 3 to 83 years, and the median age is 66. Sixty-nine percent of ill people are female. All of the cases reported being hospitalized, and one person from Macomb County, Michigan died as a result of listeriosis.

The source of the illnesses was not known until January 2016 when the laboratory result from packaged salad collected at a Dole processing facility in Springfield, Ohio, was linked to the illnesses. The CDC is recommending that consumers do not eat, restaurants do not serve, and retailers do not sell packaged salads produced at the Dole processing facility in Springfield, OH.

The company is withdrawing all packaged salads currently on the market that were produced at this facility and is temporarily (and voluntarily) suspending operations at the facility. These packaged salads were sold under various brand names including Dole, Fresh Selections, Simple Truth, Marketside, The Little Salad Bar, and President’s Choice. These packaged salads can be identified by the letter “A” at the beginning of the manufacturing code found on the package. At this time, there is no evidence to suggest that packaged salads produced at other Dole processing facilities in the United States are linked to illness.

Listeria can cause a serious, life-threatening illness. Symptoms of listeriosis include high fever, severe headache, neck stiffness, muscle aches, and nausea, sometimes diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. The disease primarily affects pregnant women, newborn babies, older adults, and adults with weakened immune systems. The incubation period is typically between 2 and 3 weeks, but can be as long as 70 days. People experiencing these symptoms and who may have consumed this packaged salad product should seek immediate medical attention.

For more information about the investigation, visit http://www.cdc.gov/listeria/outbreaks/bagged-salads-01-16/index.html

Retailer and consumer questions about the voluntary withdrawal should be directed to the Dole Food Company Consumer Response Center at 800-356-3111) (hours are 8:00am-8:00pm Eastern Time, Monday through Friday).

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Use Michigan’s parks and trails to realize fitness goals


A group snowshoes through a northern woodland, enjoying a sunny Pure Michigan winter’s day.

A group snowshoes through a northern woodland, enjoying a sunny Pure Michigan winter’s day.

From the Michigan DNR

A week into this new year, many people are working on—or perhaps already struggling to keep—resolutions to get in shape.

While those resolutions often go by the wayside before the first flip of the calendar page, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources suggests a different approach to exercise that might help people stick with a healthier lifestyle beyond a few weeks—combining exercise with family and friends.

This graphic outlines five benefits of exercising outdoors.

This graphic outlines five benefits of exercising outdoors.

“Fitness resolutions come and go each year, but spending quality time with friends and family is no fad. Spending that family time out for a walk can make for a powerful fitness pledge,” said Maia Turek, DNR statewide recreation programmer.

The DNR is encouraging Michigan residents to make 2016 #MiShoeYear and to put on their shoes, skis or skates to get outside and move.

“Whether you are taking the first step toward fitness ever or the first step in a long time, the beginning of the year is when a lot of people kick off healthier lifestyle routines,” Turek said. “When you declare #MiShoeYear, it’s more than just a workout, it’s an adventure. Explore new trails. See new vistas, get to know Michigan while you get fit.”

Calling the idea “a movement for movement,” Turek said many of Michigan’s state parks offer programs featuring outdoor winter activities like hiking, snowshoeing and cross-country skiing—some  even by candlelight or lantern light. Those looking for an outdoor adventure can find nearby events at www.michigan.gov/dnrcalendar.

With more than 100 state parks and thousands of miles of trails in Michigan, there’s also plenty of opportunity for self-guided workouts that explore the great outdoors. Find a new favorite place to run, hike, ski or snowshoe using the DNR’s Recreation Search website, www.michigandnr.com/parksandtrails/

Don’t forget about local and regional parks.

“Michigan has some of the country’s best parks, with endless ways to stay active and spend time with family and community,” said Ann Conklin, chief operating officer for mParks (Michigan Recreation and Park Association). “They’re a convenient and affordable place to get moving and build healthy, active habits.”

The unique advantages of outdoor exercise can make people more likely to stick with a fresh air fitness routine, rather than with a gym.

“There are plenty of reasons to take your workout outside,” Turek said. “Enjoying nature’s scenery will distract from your effort or fatigue, so you’ll work out longer. You’ll burn more calories because the varied terrain of a park or trail helps keep you out of a fitness rut and you’ll be happier—breathing fresh air can create a feeling of euphoria.”

Outdoor fitness also can save money and help manage time.

The DNR’s Recreation Passport—at only $11 per year for access to Michigan workout destinations, including thousands of miles of trails, 102 state parks and 136 state forest campgrounds–could be considered the most affordable gym membership available, with the most locations statewide.

The flexibility of not being confined to class schedules allows outdoor workouts to fit more easily into daily routines. Not to mention, getting outside for some active adventures can make the long Michigan winter a lot more enjoyable.

“Winter is way more fun when you get outdoors and embrace it, instead of wishing it was over. Hiding indoors has never successfully made winter go away, so make the most of it,” said Jacquelyn Baker, communications and marketing manager for mParks. “Michigan is a four-season state, and that’s a great thing. There’s something exhilarating about getting active in winter. Bundle up and breathe some fresh air. Enjoy the picturesque snow and ice.”

Eva Solomon, founder and CEO of Epic Races, agreed.

“Michigan winters are for embracing, not escaping,” Solomon said.

Solomon’s organization is offering a virtual 5K event for those who want some great gear and accountability backing their New Year’s fitness resolution. Register to participate at http://epicraces.com/event/shoe-years-day-virtual-5k/ and a portion of the proceeds will support fitness programs and reforestation efforts in Michigan state parks.

“After the overwhelming response to our Heart MI Run Virtual 5K, we created the Heart MI Snow Virtual 5K. So many people have a 5K run or walk on their bucket lists, but need some extra motivation to begin. Others are worried about feeling out of place at a group event with experienced runners,” Solomon said. “The virtual 5K gave people the opportunity to run, walk, hike, ski or snowshoe their 5K where they want and when they want, and we will reward them by sending them a shirt and medal in the mail.”

Turek said those who exercise outdoors can add to the fun by sharing their adventures on social media using #MiShoeYear.

“State parks, township parks, your neighborhood—wherever it is, just get outside and snap a selfie,” Turek said.

To help fuel up for active outdoor pursuits, the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development has compiled recipes for nutritious meals using Michigan-grown produce. The recipes, and other healthy, active lifestyle tips for families, are available at michigan.gov/puremichiganfit.

Interested in seeing how fun and easy winter outdoor fitness can be? Watch a video filmed at Muskegon State Park to get tips from Cari Draft with EcoTrek Fitness. The video is part of the “Active Living Through Parks” series, showcasing different forms of outdoor fitness and their benefits through a partnership between the DNR, mParks and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.

“Whether you want to shed a few pounds, strengthen your heart or reduce stress, outdoor exercise can get you there,” Turek said. “Grab your friends and family and head outside to take the first step toward being fresh air fit.”

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State of Michigan launches aging website 


 

Older Michiganders will now have quick and easy access to information on services in their area through a new website at www.michigan.gov/aging. The site was developed by the Aging & Adult Services Agency (AASA) within the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS), and in partnership with the Michigan Department of Management and Budget (DTMB).

“The state, in partnership with local aging agencies and service providers, offers numerous high-quality programs and services that can help older adults maintain their independence as they age,” said AASA Director Kari Sederburg. “The state’s new aging website was developed to be the best place to go to quickly find out what types of services are available, and which agency you need to call to see if you qualify.”

As part of his special message on aging in 2014, Gov. Rick Snyder charged AASA, and DTMB with the task of creating an aging website to easily connect residents with local aging programs and services.

“This new website is another step toward achieving Governor Snyder’s overall mission of creating a citizen-centric government,” said DTMB Director and State Chief Information Officer David Behen. “This one site will quickly connect older Michiganders with services they need, without having to navigate through multiple government agencies.”

The state’s aging website has been in development over the past several months and required a collaborate effort between several key state departments that interact with the state’s aging programs and services. This comprehensive team held focus groups to ensure the website organized aging programs and services in a thoughtful manner, and that it was built with the user experience firmly in mind.

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Health Department launches mosquito surveillance 


A Gravid trap, lures pregnant female mosquitoes by creating a false breeding environment.

A Gravid trap, lures pregnant female mosquitoes by creating a false breeding environment.

For West Nile Virus study 

Most people would like it if mosquitoes would just go away. Staff at the Kent County Health Department is collecting them by the thousands and they want more. Now through Labor Day, KCHD will place, monitor and maintain 11 mosquito traps in the following zip codes in the county 49503, 49507 and 49519. The goal of monitoring is disease prevention, specifically West Nile Virus (WNV).

The trap, called a Gravid trap, lures pregnant female mosquitoes by creating a false breeding environment. A pungent bait of grass clippings and yeast fools the insects by attracting them with carbon dioxide, a gas found in the exhaled breath of mammals. Mosquitoes end up sucked into a nylon net by a battery operated fan.

Each week, the mosquitoes that get trapped will be returned to KCHD where they will be pulverized and tested for West Nile Virus and other mosquito-borne illnesses. Results will be logged along with geographic information that will provide a nearly real time picture to health authorities.

N-West-Nile-Virus-study-gravid-trap-2“We have selected these areas because we know that in the past they have been hot spots for the West Nile Virus,” said Sara Simmonds, Supervising Sanitarian with the department’s Environmental Health division. “Given our past experience, we fully expect that we will find the presence of West Nile Virus within our community. Early detection is critical to help people protect themselves from contracting the virus.”

“Knowing where the virus is located will allow municipalities to make more informed decisions about eradication practices,” said Adam London, Administrative Health Officer with KCHD. “West Nile Virus is a potentially debilitating illness and we know that it is largely preventable through surveillance, education and action.”

West Nile Virus was first detected in the United States in 1999. Since the first case was diagnosed in Michigan in 2001 more than 1100 people have been diagnosed with the disease and 92 people have died. In 2001 and again in 2012, Kent County had the second highest number of West Nile cases in the state. More about West Nile Virus can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/westnile/ 

The best treatment for WNV is prevention. The Kent County Health Department recommends wearing a mosquito repellant that contains 10-35 percent DEET; wearing light colored clothing; and staying indoors during dusk. You can help stop mosquitoes from breeding by removing any standing water in your yard and keeping your lawn and shrubs cut.

More information about prevention can be found at https://www.accesskent.com/Health/CommDisease/pdfs/westnile_qa.pdf

A grant from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services is funding the project.

 

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