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Tag Archive | "MDOT"

MDOT video reminds drivers of their role in reducing fatalities


Driver behavior is a contributing factor in at least 90 percent of all fatal traffic crashes and the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) is reminding motorists of the critical role they play in traffic safety.

A new video released on the department’s YouTube channel promoting the Toward Zero Deaths (TZD) campaign highlights what MDOT is doing to reduce highway fatalities and encourages drivers to do their part to help reach the goal of zero traffic fatalities. Watch the video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=odKDsbjKWps.

“We have a lot of new safety features being built into our cars and technology is providing new engineering tools to improve safety on our roadways,” said MDOT Traffic and Safety Engineer Mark Bott. “But the most important safety feature in any vehicle is still the driver.”

The TZD campaign was born at a national strategic highway safety workshop in 2009. Since then, many states have adopted the safety campaign that brings together stakeholders and transportation partners to improve safety through education, engineering, enforcement and emergency response.

“With driver behavior factoring into about 90 percent of all fatal crashes, one key to changing driver behavior is educating the public on the scope of the issue,” Bott added. “The 1,064 people who died on our roadways last year is a larger group than the entire population of towns like Lake Linden, North Branch, Concord, or Lakeview. This is a serious public safety issue that not enough people are aware of.”

For more information on how you can help reduce traffic fatalities visit the Michigan TZD website. Go to Michigan.gov/mdot and then click on roads and travel, then safety, then Toward Zero Deaths. You can also visit the national site at www.towardzerodeaths.org.

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Year’s second Adopt-A-Highway cleanup on the way


Motorists should be on the lookout beginning Saturday as thousands of Adopt-A-Highway volunteers fan out along state roadways from Ironwood to Detroit picking up litter. Participants in the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) program will clean highway roadsides from July 15 to 23 during the second of three scheduled pickups this year.

“These dedicated Adopt-A-Highway volunteers help maintain our highways as a source of pride for every community in Michigan,” said State Transportation Director Kirk T. Steudle. “Let’s show our respect for their hard work by staying alert during the summer pickup and driving with extra caution when we see these crews on the roadside.”

Every year, Adopt-A-Highway volunteers collect more than 60,000 bags of trash. The popular program began in 1990 and has grown to involve more than 2,800 groups cleaning 6,400 miles of highway.

Getting involved in the program is straightforward. Volunteers include members of civic groups, businesses and families. Crew members have to be at least 12 years old and each group must include at least three people. Groups are asked to adopt a section of highway for at least two years. There is no fee to participate. Adopt-A-Highway signs bearing group names are posted along the stretches of adopted highway.

When working in a highway right of way, Adopt-A-Highway volunteers wear high-visibility, yellow-green safety vests required by federal regulations. MDOT provides free vests and trash bags, and arranges to haul away the trash.

Sections of highway are available for adoption all over the state. Montcalm County, for example, has least 10 sections available. Interested groups can get more information on joining the program at www.michigan.gov/adoptahighway.

The year’s final Adopt-A-Highway pickup is scheduled for the fall, from Sept. 23 to Oct. 1.

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National Bike Month


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With the welcome return of warm weather, May is recognized as National Bike Month. Bike to Work Week is May 15-19, with Friday, May 19, designated as Bike to Work Day. The Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) encourages other transportation agencies and the public to help raise bicycling safety awareness and promote the safety message: Give ‘em Space, Make it Safe, Please Share the Road.

In 2016, there were 1,959 reported crashes involving bicyclists in Michigan that resulted in 1,563 injuries and 38 fatalities. According to the Michigan State Police Office of Highway Safety Planning (OHSP), that number of fatalities is up 15 percent from 2015 (33). The number of fatal crashes involving bicyclists remains disproportionately high compared to other roadway users or crash types.

Motorists are reminded that bicyclists are permitted to ride on most roadways in the state. In fact, Michigan has a growing number of bike lanes and thousands of miles of shared-use pathways that bicyclists use and enjoy. Many communities are building bicycle-friendly infrastructure, and drivers must remain attentive when driving and take extra care when approaching bicyclists as the warmer spring months lure people outdoors.

Bicyclists are reminded that, as legal roadway users, they are required to obey all traffic laws, signs and signals. A person operating a bicycle upon a highway or street at less than the existing speed of traffic shall ride as close as practicable to the right-hand curb or edge of the roadway.

For maps and other important bicycling information, including “What Every Michigan Driver Should Know About Bike Lanes,” go to:  www.michigan.gov/mdot-biking.

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US131 and other roads see speed limit increases


Click to enlarge.

Click to enlarge.

MDOT-logo-fcIf you travel US131 north from Cedar Springs, you can now legally make the drive just a little faster. That’s because US131, from M-57 (14 Mile) north to the end of the freeway, is one of the routes recently chosen for a speed increase from 70 to 75 mph.

N-MichiganStatePolice-logoIn accordance with new state law, the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) and Michigan State Police (MSP) have identified 600 miles of freeway for speed limit increases to 75 mph, and 900 miles of non-freeway state highways for speed limit increases to 65 mph. Select freeway routes had increased speed limits posted beginning May 1.

Public Act 445, passed by the state Legislature in late 2016, tasked the two agencies with increasing speed limits on some state highways and freeways based on 85th percentile speeds (the speed at or below which 85 percent of traffic is moving) and the results of engineering and safety studies. The law requires that these modified speed limits be in place prior to Jan. 5, 2018.

“The corridors identified by MDOT and MSP were selected not only because studies indicated most drivers were already driving at those increased speeds, but also because their design and safety features were best suited to these speed limits,” said State Transportation Director Kirk T. Steudle. “We reviewed design speeds, crash patterns, number of access points, traffic volumes and continuity of these corridors, and chose them to minimize necessary improvements for higher speed limits.”

“The engineering and safety studies conducted utilized the 85th percentile speed, which is a national scientifically proven method to determine and establish safe speed limits,” stated Col. Kriste Kibbey Etue, director of the MSP. “Troopers and motor carrier officers do, and will continue to, aggressively enforce all posted speed limits to ensure compliance by the motoring public.”

MDOT began posting new speed limits beginning May 1, starting with three freeway routes:

I-75: From Bay City to US-23 in Mackinaw City (Bay, Arenac, Ogemaw, Roscommon, Crawford, Otsego, Cheboygan, and Emmet counties), and St. Ignace to Sault Ste. Marie (Mackinac and Chippewa counties).

US127: From I-69 to the end of the freeway at St. Johns (Clinton County), and the beginning of the freeway at Ithaca to I75 (Gratiot, Isabella, Clare, Roscommon, and Crawford counties)

US131: From M-57 to the end of the freeway north of Manton (Kent, Montcalm, Mecosta, Osceola, and Wexford counties).

New speed limits will be posted on those three routes by mid-May.

MDOT also will begin installing sign overlays reflecting the new 65 mph speed limit for trucks and buses on state roadways with posted speed limits of 65 mph or greater. The new maximum speed limit for trucks and buses was another change prompted by Public Act 445.

MDOT and MSP are finalizing the administrative processes and signing traffic control orders to implement increased speed limits on the remaining freeway and non-freeway corridors. New speed limits will be posted on all of the selected freeway and non-freeway routes prior to mid-November.

While implementing these modified speed limits, MDOT also will install advisory speed and curve warning signs, shorten passing zones, move signs, and change pavement markings where necessary. Reduced speed limits in communities along these corridors will remain in place.

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Major US-131 project starts this week


MDOT plans to reconstruct the stretch of US131 from south of 14 Mile to two miles north of where it crosses over White Creek Ave.

MDOT plans to reconstruct the stretch of US131 from south of 14 Mile to two miles north of where it crosses over White Creek Ave.

The road project many residents have hoped for finally begins this Thursday, April 13.

The Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) will invest $22 million to reconstruct northbound and southbound US-131 between 14 Mile Road and White Creek Avenue (just north of 17 Mile Road). Work also includes repairing three bridges, culvert and drainage improvements, new signs, and ramp reconstruction at 14 Mile Road and 17 Mile Road.

Two lanes of traffic will be maintained in each direction with the use of temporary crossovers and a split-merge traffic shift. This configuration is scheduled to go into effect April 21. Intermittent ramp and lane closures will be used throughout the project.

Ramp closures for ramp reconstruction will be allowed for a maximum of 14 calendar days per ramp. Ramps to be reconstructed include all 17 Mile Rd ramps, northbound 14 Mile Rd on ramp, and southbound 14 Mile Rd off ramp.

Visit www.Michigan.gov/drive for updates and sign up to receive Kent County traffic notices via text or email.

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MDOT to redo US131 between 14 and 17 Mile 


 

MDOT plans to reconstruct the stretch of US131 from south of 14 Mile to two miles north of where it crosses over White Creek Ave.

MDOT plans to reconstruct the stretch of US131 from south of 14 Mile to two miles north of where it crosses over White Creek Ave.

Public meeting March 16 at Cedar Springs High School 4-6 p.m.

By Judy Reed

Are you tired of driving over the rough spots on US131 between 14 Mile and 17 Mile Road and wondering (probably for the millionth time) when they are going to fix this road? You won’t have to wonder much longer.

The Michigan Department of Transportation announced details on Friday, March 3, of their plans to reconstruct that stretch of highway. The project will begin on April 15 and should be open to traffic on November 5.

There will be a public informational meeting about the project at Cedar Springs High School, 204 E. Muskegon, in the cafeteria, on Thursday, March 16, from 4-6 p.m.

According to John Richard, spokesperson for MDOT, the construction influence area will begin with warning signs on US131 two miles south of 14 Mile and continue to two miles north of where it crosses over White Creek Avenue. The influence area will also include one mile east and west of intersection roads and ramps.

The work will include hot mix asphalt (HMA) reconstruction and rehabilitation of three bridges, including concrete curb, gutter and culvert, drainage, signing and pavement markings.

Traffic impact

Two lanes of traffic will be maintained in each direction on US-131 with the use of temporary crossovers and a split-merge traffic shift. Southbound US-131 will have a single lane closure while maintaining one lane of traffic for one week to place top course of HMA. Northbound US-131 will have a single lane closure while maintaining one lane of traffic for one week to place top course of HMA.

Ramp closures

Ramp closures for ramp reconstruction will be allowed for a maximum of 14 calendar days per ramp. Ramps to be reconstructed include all 17 Mile Rd ramps, northbound 14 Mile Rd on ramp, and southbound 14 Mile Rd off ramp.

Detours when ramps are closed:  

  • 17 Mile NB US-131 off ramp: drivers will get off at 14 Mile instead and take White Creek Ave. north.
  • 17 Mile NB US-131 on ramp: Drivers will get on SB US-131 instead and get off at 14 Mile Rd, then back on to NB US-131.
  • 17 Mile SB US-131 on ramp: drivers will take White Creek Ave to 14 Mile Rd. and get on SB US-131.
  • 17 Mile SB US-131 off ramp: drivers will get off at 14 Mile Rd and back on to NB US-131.
  • 14 Mile Rd NB US-131 on ramp: drivers will take White Creek Ave to 17 Mile Rd. and get on NB US-131.
  • 14 Mile Rd SB US-131 off ramp: drivers will get off at 17 Mile Rd. and take Algoma Ave. to 14 Mile.
  • When SB US-131 outside lane is under construction, the 17 Mile Rd off ramp, 17 Mile Rd on ramp and 14 Mile off ramps will each be closed for 14 days. A pre-detour will utilize 22 Mile Rd to White Creek Ave to 14 Mile Rd.
  • When NB US-131 outside lane is under construction, 14 Mile Rd on ramp, 17 Mile Rd off ramp and 17 Mile on ramps will each be closed for 14 days. A pre-detour will utilize 14 Mile Rd to White Creek Ave to 22 Mile Rd. That detour could change to Algoma.

Traffic Restrictions:

  • 14 Mile on ramp and 17 mile on ramp cannot be closed at the same time
  • 17 mile on ramp and 17 mile off ramp cannot be closed at the same time

Shoulder closures

14 Mile Rd and 17 Mile Rd will have lane/shoulder closures but will maintain two-way traffic at all times with the exception for the paving of ramp terminals, when traffic will be maintained using traffic regulators.

When the bridge over White Creek Avenue is being worked on, it will require access to the bridge from down below, so White Creek Ave will have one lane maintained for two-way traffic by utilizing a temporary signal. Bridge work will include substructure reinforcements, joint replacement on the bridge deck and painting.

Be sure to attend the meeting at the high school on March 16 and get your questions answered.

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New left turn signals at 17 Mile and White Creek


 

This photo shows a new left-hand turn signal for westbound traffic at 17 Mile and White Creek. There is also a signal on the other side for eastbound traffic turning left. Photo by J. Reed.

This photo shows a new left-hand turn signal for westbound traffic at 17 Mile and White Creek. There is also a signal on the other side for eastbound traffic turning left. Photo by J. Reed.

By Judy Reed

Kent County recently installed two new traffic signals at White Creek and 17 Mile Road that will hopefully cut down on crashes in that intersection. Drivers that travel eastbound on 17 Mile and wish to turn left (north) on White Creek and those traveling westbound who wish to turn left (south) on White Creek now have a left-hand turn signal to help time their turn.

“Our Traffic and Safety Division had received a number of concerns regarding the intersection and had been monitoring the location,” explained Maura Lamoreaux, communications spokesman for the Kent County Road Commission. “Integral to the decision to install the signal was data that included the types of crashes occurring and the volume of traffic at the intersection, particularly the volume of eastbound left turns coupled with the lack of gaps in opposing westbound traffic.”

Lamoreaux said that the most recent 24-hour count showed approximately 19,000 vehicles travel through that intersection every day.

People might also be happy to know that another busy intersection in the area will get a stop and go signal later this year. The Michigan Department of Transportation will put in the signal at M-57 (14 Mile) and Myers Lake Avenue. “The traffic signal study showed significant delays on Myers Lake Rd, high enough traffic volumes, and a lack of gaps in the M-57 traffic stream,” explained John Richard, with MDOT. He said the signal will be installed sometime in their 2017 fiscal year, which means by or before September 30, 2017.

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Mild winters are harsh on Michigan roads 


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Unseasonably warm temperatures provide a nice break from Michigan’s long winter. But they also offer another break that’s not so nice. With each sustained warm-up, the roads that have been frozen begin to thaw from the surface downward, and the melting snow and ice saturate the ground. The roadbed, softened by trapped moisture beneath the pavement, is more susceptible to damage during every significant thaw. A sustained thaw typically happens only once a year in the spring but not this year. Continuous temperatures above and below freezing have created several freeze-thaw cycles, which also create potholes.

“It’s normal to get a few days throughout the winter that are warmer than usual, but this year has been unusually sporadic,” said State Transportation Director Kirk T. Steudle. “Extreme temperature fluctuations create many issues for road maintenance.”

Potholes are most prevalent during freeze/thaw cycles, when water penetrates the pavement surface and refreezes, pushing the pavement up. Vehicles then push the pavement back down, breaking it and starting a pothole.

“The quicker we know about where potholes are forming, the sooner we can get them patched,” added Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) Engineer of Operations Mark Geib. “Patching them won’t last, but will help get us through until warmer temperatures are sustained.”

If you spot a pothole on an I-, US- or M-route, you can report it to the MDOT Pothole Hotline at 888-296-4546, by going online to MDOT’s “Report a Pothole” website at https://goo.gl/x6Rgo9 or by calling your local MDOT Transportation Service Center (TSC) or region office.

N-PotholesMDOT is not responsible for County or city/village roads. If you see a pothole on a county road that you’d like to have fixed, complete the online “Report an Issue” form at http://www.kentcountyroads.net/report-an-issue or call KCRC at 616-242-6950.

For potholes on local city/village roads, call the office of the city or village where you reside. In the City of Cedar Springs call the DPW at 696-1330. In the Village of Sand Lake, call 636-8854.

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Reality Check


car-mdot-reality-checkMyth #8: MDOT is replacing perfectly good signs.

Reality: MDOT replaces signs and posts regularly to keep them visible at night and current with federal safety guidelines.

MDOT regularly replaces signs along our highway corridors as part of a 100 percent federally funded statewide program, on a rotation about every 15 years. This is to ensure these signs are visible both day and night and meet federal standards.

Modern road signs have a reflective surface directing lights from a vehicle’s headlights back to the driver’s eyes. This allows drivers to see and read signs much sooner than those without this feature. By 2030, one in five drivers will be 65 or older. While a 65-year-old needs eight times the light to see as a 25-year-old does, bright, highly reflective signs help drivers of all ages see, and react, more quickly to signs’ information.

The reflective surface degrades over time due to weather, sun exposure, or other damage. When this happens, the signs become difficult to see and read at night. While only 25 percent of all travel occurs at night, about half of all traffic fatalities happen after dark. It’s the same reason we regularly repaint pavement markings.

As with the signs themselves, sign posts must meet state and federal safety standards, and degrade over time. When we replace the signs, we usually replace the posts at the same time to make sure they’ll break away as they should if struck by a vehicle. Replacing the signs and posts together is more cost-effective than doing it separately.

Looks can be deceiving, and just because a sign looks good in broad daylight doesn’t mean it’s as visible once the sun goes down. MDOT’s sign replacement program is designed to make sure that when motorists need the information highway signs provide, they can find it – day or night.

For more on this transportation myth, visit www.michigan.gov/realitycheck.

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Final Adopt-A-Highway cleanup of year starts Saturday


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It’s that time again: a chill is in the air, leaves are beginning to turn, and crews are getting ready for the year’s last Adopt-A-Highway pickup along state roadways. Participants in the popular Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) program will be picking up litter along highway roadsides from Saturday, Sept. 24, through Sunday, Oct. 2.

“We’d like to thank our thousands of Adopt-A-Highway crews for their dedication and hard work to help keep Michigan roadsides clean,” said State Transportation Director Kirk T. Steudle. “Every year, these volunteers provide a financial boost for MDOT and our entire state. Their service is greatly appreciated.”

car-final-adopt-a-highway2There are three scheduled Adopt-A-Highway pickups each year: one each in the spring, summer and fall. Michigan volunteers have been participating in the program since 1990. Every year, Adopt-A-Highway crews collect about 70,000 bags of trash. The volunteer efforts of nearly 3,200 Adopt-A-Highway groups generate about $5 million annually in value for state taxpayers.

During the pickup period, motorists should be on the lookout for volunteers wearing high-visibility, yellow-green safety vests. MDOT provides free vests and trash bags, and arranges to haul away the trash.
Volunteers include members of civic groups, businesses and families. Crew members have to be at least 12 years old and each group must number at least three people.

Sections of highway are still available for adoption. Interested groups should check the MDOT Adopt-A-Highway website at www.michigan.gov/adoptahighway for more information and the name of their county’s coordinator, who can specify available roadsides. Groups are asked to adopt a section of highway for at least two years; there is no fee to participate. Adopt-A-Highway volunteer groups are recognized with signs bearing a group’s name posted along stretches of adopted highway.

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