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Tag Archive | "lung cancer"

JUDITH DePUE


Judith “Judy” Suzanne (Ellick) DePue, 76 of Greenville, passed away Sunday, July 9, 2017 at the home of her daughter. Judy was born September 23, 1940 in Cedar Springs, Kent Co., Michigan, the daughter of the late Everett and Ilah (Crawford) Ellick. Judy is loved and survived by her children: Monique (Dave) Doolittle and Vincent (Kayleen) DePue; grandchildren: Trafford (Ashley Hattis) Giles, Stephani (Nick Dolloff) Doolittle, Nick (Tara Smith) Doolittle, Michael (Ceara) DePue, Kyle (Amber Dargitz) DePue, Donald Eikenhout, Andrea (Larry) Wiley and Graham DePue; great-grandchildren; and nieces and nephews. Judy was preceded in death by her husband of 56 years, Franklin “Frank” John DePue (April 14, 2016); and her brother, Mahlon “Sonny” Philo Ellick. Growing up, Judy spent her days entertained by her comic books, her love of animals, and her wonderful, endless imagination. Her very advanced intelligence allowed her a place as a member of Mensa and left her parents with the decision to send her to a school for the intellectually gifted, which at the time was not an option for them. As a young woman, she discovered a love of writing and drawing, as well as spending time with her horse, Sundance, who was her animal soulmate. She shared countless stories of her adventures with him. At age 19, Judy met her husband to be, Frank DePue, at a dance. She sat down by him because, in her words, “He looked harmless.” It wasn’t love at first sight but in time turned into an amazing love story. They, along with their two children, Monique and Vincent, embarked on many wonderful endeavors. They were owners of the Double D Saddle Shop, owned a hobby farm, and ultimately opened Animal Crackers Farm Petting Zoo. Judy’s knowledge and love of animals, along with Frank’s radiating personality, made for the perfect partnership. Most of Judy’s family would agree that she was one of the strongest, most stubborn women on Earth. At the end of her time with us, she struggled with health issues for many years and lived for nearly 5 years with lung cancer. Even through her illnesses, she never lost her passion for animals, reading, and drawing. She was an amazing mother and grandmother, and she instilled her gift of imagination and whimsy with her stories. Her favorite thing to do was to talk. Everyone who knew her, knew they had better plan on some extra time if they were going to visit with Judy. We will miss her beyond comprehension and take great comfort in knowing that she has been reunited with the love of her life, Frank. We all imagine that they are dancing once again. Memorial Services for Judy will take place at 1:00 p.m. on Wednesday, July 19, 2017 at Hurst Funeral Home, with Pastor Ken Harger officiating. Visitation will be Tuesday from 6 – 8 p.m. Memorial contributions may be made to The DePue Family c/o Monique Doolittle. Memories and messages of condolence may be shared via www.hurstfh.com.

Arrangements by Hurst Funeral Home, Greenville

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Free Radon test kits for residents


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The Kent County Health Department (KCHD) is teaming up with the Grand Rapids Griffins to stop a silent killer—lung cancer caused by radon gas. This Friday, January 6, 2017, at Van Andel Arena when the Griffins take on the Charlotte Checkers at 7:00 p.m., KCHD staff will be there armed with thousands of radon test kits. They will be situated in the upper concourse near section 128, and will give the kits away while supplies last.

For those not attending the Griffins game, KCHD is offering free radon test kits to Kent County residents at all three of its locations until the supply runs out.

Colorless and odorless, radon gas kills more Americans annually than drunk driving and drowning combined according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) says more than 20 thousand deaths are caused by radon each year making it the nation’s second leading cause of lung cancer next to smoking.

The Kent County Health Department (KCHD) recommends that all homes should be tested for radon every few years.

Testing is the only way to know if radon is present in your home.

“Testing for radon is an easy and important step in protecting the health of your family,” says Sara Simmonds, Supervising Sanitarian with the Kent County Health Department. “The kit is easy to use. Simply hang a filter inside your house for a few days, then send it in a self-addressed, pre-stamped envelope for testing.”

People using the kits will receive their results via email once the kit is received and tested. Residents can use the information when deciding on how best to pursue remediation. For help understanding the test results, please contact the KCHD Environmental Health Division at 616-632-6900.

Radon occurs naturally in the ground. It seeps into buildings through cracks or openings in foundations or floors. It occurs in both new and old homes. Radon has been found in houses built over a basement, over a crawlspace or built on slab-on-grade. The EPA and the U.S. Geological Survey have developed a map of risk zones for the United States. You can view the risk maps by clicking here. Kent County is typically categorized as having moderate to high levels of radon.

The kits are available Monday-Friday from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. at the:

Kent County Health Department, 700 Fuller Avenue NE, Grand Rapids.

KCHD North County Clinic at 4388 14 Mile Road NE, Rockford.

KCHD South Clinic at 4700 Kalamazoo SE, Kentwood.

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Kent County offering free radon test kits


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You can’t see, smell or taste radon but the radioactive gas can kill. Next to smoking, radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States, claiming the lives of more than 20,000 Americans every year, according to the U.S. Surgeon General.

The Kent County Health Department (KCHD) recommends that all homes should be tested for radon every few years. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has designated January as national Radon Action Month, a perfect time for you to protect your family by testing your home. Testing is the only way to know if radon is present in your home.

N-Radon2While supplies last, KCHD is offering free radon test kits to Kent County residents. “Testing for radon is an easy and important step in protecting the health of your family,” says Sara Simmonds, supervising sanitarian with the Kent County Health Department. “The kit is easy to use. Simply hang a filter inside your house for a few days, then send it in a self-addressed, pre-stamped envelope for testing.”

Residents using the kits and the State of Michigan’s Department of Environmental Quality will both receive the results. Residents can use the information when deciding on how best to pursue remediation, and the state gains a better understanding of the locations and prevalence of radon in Michigan. For help understanding the test results, please contact the KCHD Environmental Health Division at 616-632-6900.

Radon occurs naturally in the ground. It seeps into buildings through cracks or openings in the foundation of floors and walls, around sump openings, or spaces around plumbing. It occurs in both new and old homes. Radon has been found in houses built over a basement, over a crawlspace or built on slab-on-grade. The EPA and the U.S. Geological Survey have developed a map of risk zones for the United States. You can view the risk maps by going online to http://www.epa.gov/radon/find-information-about-local-radon-zones-and-radon-programs#radonmap. Kent County is typically categorized as having a moderate to high levels of radon.

The kits are available Monday-Friday from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. at the:

  • Kent County Health Department, 700 Fuller Avenue NE, Grand Rapids KCHD
  • North County Clinic at 4388 14 Mile Road NE, Rockford
  • KCHD South Clinic at 4700 Kalamazoo SE, Kentwood

Only one kit will be given per household.

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Do you have a problem with radon?


October 17-24 is radon action week

Did you know that nearly 1 in 8 homes in our state could have a radon problem, and the residents would not know it? Colorless, odorless and tasteless, this radioactive gas can increase your risk of lung cancer. Now that many families are turning on their heat, it’s time to know if this dangerous gas is lingering in your home.
October 17-24 is Radon Action Week here in Michigan and across the United States. Health agencies throughout the United States have joined forces to promote awareness of the leading cause of lung cancer for non-smokers. The American Lung Association, Centers for Disease Control, and National Cancer Institute all agree that radon is a National health problem and encourage radon testing during the October awareness drive.
Radon is naturally occurring in rock and soil. It can enter buildings through cracks or openings in the foundation of floors and walls, around sump openings, or spaces around plumbing. It occurs in both new and old homes, or houses built over a basement, over a crawlspace or built on slab-on-grade.
Millions of Americans are unknowingly exposed to this dangerous gas. In fact, a recent study by Harvard University ranks radon as America’s #1 in-home hazard. By taking simple steps to test your home for radon and fix if necessary, this health hazard can be avoided. Radon gas is not isolated to certain geographical areas or home types. Radon problems have been detected in homes in every county of the U.S. It caused more American fatalities last year than carbon monoxide, fires, and handguns combined! If a home hasn’t been tested for radon in the past two years, EPA and the Surgeon General urge you to take action.
The only way to know if there is radon in your home is to test for it. Just hang a small filter in your home for about one week, and mail it for testing in a pre-paid envelope. You can buy this kit at the Kent County Health Department for just $5. Pick one up at 700 Fuller Ave., NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 or call them at 616-632-6900.
Radon test kits are also available from Healthy Homes Coalition of West Michigan, 742 Franklin St., SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49507, phone 616-241-3300.
In Montcalm County, check with the Mid-Michigan District Health Department, 615 N. State Rd., Suite 1, Stanton, MI 48888, phone 989-831-5237.
The federal commitment made by EPA, the General Services Administration, and the departments of Agriculture, Defense, Energy, Health and Human Services, Housing and Urban Development, Interior, and Veterans Affairs will focus efforts on radon reduction and mitigation in homes, especially those of low-income families, many of whom do not have the resources to make the simple fixes necessary to protect their homes and loved ones.  Learn more about the Federal Radon Action Plan at www.RadonPlan.org.

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