web analytics

Tag Archive | "lower peninsula"

DNR confirms presence of a cougar in Lower Peninsula


This photo was submitted to the DNR from a Haslett resident. The cougar is just behind the mailbox on the right side of the road.

Photo taken in Bath Township, Clinton County

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources has confirmed the presence of a cougar—also referred to as a mountain lion—in Bath Township, Clinton County. This is the first time the presence of a cougar has been verified by the DNR in Michigan’s Lower Peninsula.

On June 21, 2017, a Haslett resident took a photograph of an animal from his vehicle in Bath Township near the DNR’s Rose Lake State Wildlife Area. The individual reported that he spotted a large cat in his headlights as the animal attempted to cross a road. He captured the photograph as the cougar turned back from the road into an area of thick vegetation.

The picture was made available to the DNR June 26. A field investigation ensued. DNR biologist Chad Fedewa and biologists from the DNR’s Cougar Team reviewed the photo and visited the site where it was taken, determining that the animal in the photo was a cougar.

“Even with this verification, questions remain, especially regarding the origins of the animal,” said Kevin Swanson, DNR wildlife specialist and member of the agency’s Cougar Team. “There is no way for us to know if this animal is a dispersing transient from a western state, like cougars that have been genetically tested from the Upper Peninsula, or if this cat was released locally.”

Cougars originally were native to Michigan, but were extirpated from Michigan around the turn of the century. The last time a wild cougar was legally taken in the state was near Newberry in 1906. Over the past few years, numerous cougar reports have been received from various locations throughout Michigan. Until this time, all confirmed sightings or tracks have been in the Upper Peninsula. Since 2008 a total of 36 cougar sightings have been documented in Michigan’s U.P. To date, the DNR has not confirmed a breeding population of cougars in Michigan.

Cougars are protected under the state Endangered Species Act and cannot be harmed except to protect human life.

Interested landowners within the area of the recent Clinton County sighting may wish to place trail cameras on their properties. The DNR encourage citizens to submit pictures of possible sightings for verification. Observations should be reported at mi.gov/eyesinthefield. If you find physical evidence of a cougar such as scat, tracks or a carcass, do not disturb the area and keep the physical evidence intact. Please include any photos with your report.

The odds of encountering a cougar in the wild are very small, and attacks on humans are extremely rare. Should you encounter a cougar:

  • Face the animal and do not act submissive. Stand tall, wave your arms and talk in a loud voice.
  • Never run from a cougar or other large carnivore. If children are present, pick them up so they cannot run.
  • Do not crouch and get on all fours.
  • If attacked, fight back with whatever is available. DO NOT play dead.
  • Report the encounter to local authorities and the DNR as soon as possible.

To learn more about cougars, visit mi.gov/cougars.

 

 

Posted in Featured, News, OutdoorsComments (1)

DNR seeks bear den locations in northern Lower Peninsula


_out-bear-dens-yearling-in-den

While out in the field, hunters and trappers could come upon a denned black bear. The Department of Natural Resources is looking for locations of denned bears in the northern Lower Peninsula, in order to fit them with a radio collar for an ongoing bear management program.

“Information gathered from bears assists in managing the black bear population,” said Mark Boersen, wildlife biologist at the DNR Roscommon Customer Service Center. “Currently, we have four female bears being monitored from both air and ground using radio tracking equipment.”

After locating a denned bear, DNR biologists will determine if the animal is a good candidate for a radio collar. Bears that are selected will be sedated by a wildlife biologist and fitted with a collar and ear tags. A small non-functional tooth will be collected to determine the bear’s age and to provide a DNA sample. Upon completion of the short procedure, biologists will carefully return the bear to its den, where it will sleep through the remainder of the winter months.

Those who encounter bear dens are asked to record the location, with a GPS unit if possible, and contact Mark Boersen at (989) 275-5151 or boersenm@michigan.gov with specific location information. It is illegal to disturb a bear den or to disturb, harm, or molest a bear in its den.

Posted in OutdoorsComments (0)

DNR seeks denned bears in northern Lower Peninsula


Michigan DNR wildlife biologist Mark Boersen is shown here working with a radio-collared bear. The DNR is asking hunters, trappers and others in the woods this season to keep an eye out for denned bears; that information will help the department with important bear research.

Michigan DNR wildlife biologist Mark Boersen is shown here working with a radio-collared bear. The DNR is asking hunters, trappers and others in the woods this season to keep an eye out for denned bears; that information will help the department with important bear research.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is looking for denned bear locations in the northern Lower Peninsula, and is asking those who come across a denned black bear during their hunting, trapping or other outdoor adventures to let the DNR know. Additional black bears, to be fitted with radio collars, are needed for an ongoing bear research project.

“Information gathered from bears assists in managing the black bear population,” said Mark Boersen, DNR wildlife biologist at the Roscommon Customer Service Center. “Currently, we have four female bears being monitored from both air and ground using radio-tracking equipment.”

After a denned bear is located, DNR biologists will determine if the animal is a good candidate for radio-collaring. Bears that are selected will be sedated by a wildlife biologist and fitted with a radio-tracking collar and ear tags. Hair samples will be taken for DNA analysis, and a small, nonfunctional tooth will be collected to determine the bear’s age. Upon completion of the short procedure, biologists will carefully return the bear to its den, where it will spend the remainder of the winter months.

People who encounter bear dens are asked to record the location, with a GPS unit if possible, and contact Mark Boersen at 989-275-5151 or boersenm@michigan.gov to provide specific location information. The DNR reminds everyone that it is illegal to disturb a bear den or disturb, harm or molest a bear in its den.

Learn more about radio telemetry and other wildlife research projects by visitingmi.gov/wildlife and clicking on “Wild Science.”

Posted in OutdoorsComments (0)

DNR seeks Lower Peninsula bear den sites for ongoing research


 

While out in the field in Michigan’s Lower Peninsula, hunters and trappers might come upon a denned black bear. The Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is looking for locations of denned bear in order to fit them with a radio collar for ongoing bear research.

“Information gathered from female bears helps us to manage the black bear population,” said wildlife biologist Mark Boersen. Currently, only three female bears are being monitored in the northern Lower Peninsula through the use of radio-tracking equipment.

“We would like to have a few more female bear collared throughout the area,” said Boersen. “Hunters are all over northern Michigan right now, and they provide a great set of eyes for information on denning locations.”

After locating a denned bear, biologists will determine if the animal is a good candidate for radio-collaring. Only female bears are selected. They will be sedated by a biologist and fitted with a radio-tracking collar and ear tags. Hair samples will be taken for DNA analysis, and a small tooth will be collected to determine the bear’s age. Upon completion of the short procedure, biologists will carefully return the bear to the den where it will sleep through the remainder of the winter months.

People who encounter bear dens are asked to record the location, with a GPS unit if possible, and contact Mark Boersen at the DNR Roscommon Operations Service Center at 989-275-5151. The public is reminded that they should not disturb a bear den or disturb, harm or molest a bear in its den.

Posted in OutdoorsComments (0)

Weekly fishing report


From the DNR

 

Southwest Lower Peninsula

Inland lake fishing for bluegills and crappie is starting to pick-up. Carp have already been spotted in shallow waters.

New Buffalo:  Is producing some limit catches of coho and steelhead. Dowagiac River:  Has good steelhead fishing.

St. Joseph:  Anglers were catching steelhead and catfish from the piers.

St. Joseph River:  Steelhead fishing has been good especially near the Berrien Springs Dam. Sucker fishing was also good.

Silver Lake:  In Branch County is starting to produce a fair number of bluegill.

Union Lake:  In Branch County was giving up some 10 inch perch. Those fishing along the east end of the lake caught redears.

Kalamazoo River:  Still has good steelhead fishing however the run will be winding down soon.

Grand River at Grand Rapids:  Is producing steelhead and catfish.

Grand River at Lansing:  The occasional steelhead has been caught over at Moore’s Park Dam and at the point where the Grand meets the Red Cedar. Anglers are using spawn, spinners or crank baits. Good colors to try are chartreuse and fire-tiger. Catfish are hitting on dead minnows, stink baits, crawlers and small bluegills.

Lake Interstate: Is producing some nice bluegills in deeper water. Try a wax worm under a slip bobber. The lake is south of Lansing towards Potterville. Jackson:  Boats are taking to the inland lakes for panfish.

Lake Ovid: A few boat anglers are getting out but catch rates were still slow in part due to the cold water temperatures.

Muskegon River: Has good steelhead fishing.

 

Posted in OutdoorsComments (0)


Kent Theatre
Advertising Rates Brochure

Get the Cedar Springs Post in your mailbox for only $35.00 a year!