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Tag Archive | "Kent County"

Duo arrested for home invasions


Christopher Johnson

Jackie Sturgis

The Kent County Sheriff Department has arrested a man and woman for home invasions occurring in northeastern Kent County during April and May.

Jackie Lee Sturgis, 32, of Greenville, was arraigned in 63rd District Court, on May 29, on a felony charge of home invasion 2nd degree. Bond was set at $25,000.

Suspect Christopher Lee Johnson, 32, was arraigned in 63rd District Court on a felony charge of weapons-firearms-receiving and concealing with bond being set at $35,000. Both were also charged as habitual offenders.

According to Undersheriff John Hess, the two were arrested for home invasions in Courtland and Oakfield Townships. Some stolen property was recovered and investigators are working to determine which incidents Sturgis and Johnson may be responsible for.

 

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GRCC millage fails; Pierson president survives recall


Kent County voters sent Grand Rapids Community College the same message Tuesday that they’ve sent three times since 2007: NO NEW TAXES.

The college had asked for a $98 million bond proposal to upgrade facilities, and it was soundly defeated by a vote of 26,417 (no) to 19,856 (yes). While Grandville, Northview and Lowell also had millages on the ballot, most communities had nothing else on the ballot, which led to low voter turn out.

Voters in Grandville nixed a $22.85 million bond proposal by a narrow margin—only 38 votes. There were 2,508 no votes, to 2,470 yes votes.

Lowell renewed their operating millage, and Northview passed an $11.9 million bond proposal.

In Montcalm County, Pierson Village President Karl VanHaren survived a recall election by three votes—24 to 21. He has filed a recall petition against three of the trustees involved in the recall against him: Rebecca Starr, Duane Grifes, and Verna Smigiel. That vote will take place in August.

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Animal shelter selected for ASPCA challenge


What if the click of a mouse could save animals in Kent County? Recently, the Kent County Animal Shelter (KCAS) submitted an application to compete in the ASPCA/Rachel Ray $100K Challenge and their application was accepted! But they need your help to win the challenge.

In order for them to compete, they need members of the community to vote for them online. Out of more than one hundred shelters that applied, only the top 50 with the most votes will be allowed to compete. Voting runs from April 5- April 16th. Votes can be submitted at www.votetosavelives.org. Encourage your friends and family members to voice their support for KCAS so that we can save more animals! Voting takes less than a minute and you can submit a new vote every day.

The first time you vote, you need to check your email for a confirmation from the website that validates the email address and you have to reply to it. Once this is done the first time, you do not need to repeat for subsequent votes. Also, the same party voting from separate email addresses will not get credit for an extra vote.

The Kent County Animal Shelter says they will be challenged to come up with innovative ways to save at least 300 more dogs and cats within a three-month period (August 1 through October 31) than were saved during the same three months in 2011. A “save” is quantified as an adoption, a transfer, a reclaim, or when an Animal Control Officer returns a stray dog in the field. Prizes range between $5,000 and $125,000.

 

 

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Kent County health rankings improving


From the Kent County Health Department

The national County Health Rankings were released last week by the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Kent County ranked 15th in Health Outcomes, which consisted of measures relating to how long people live, how healthy people feel, and emotional well-being. The ranking is a major improvement over 2010, the first year of the report, when we ranked 22nd in the state.

The Health Outcomes measure put Kent County 15th out of 82 Michigan counties. The second measure, Health Factors, ranked Kent County 19th in the state; up from 25th in 2010. That part of the study looks at measures that affect health, such as access to healthy foods, air pollution levels, education, income, smoking, and obesity. Some of the findings the rankings have determined nationally:

• People are nearly twice as likely to be in fair or poor health in the unhealthiest counties;

• Unhealthy counties have significantly lower high school graduation rates;

• Unhealthy counties have more than twice as many children in poverty;

• Unhealthy counties have much fewer grocery stores or farmer’s markets; and

• Unhealthy counties have much higher rates of unemployment.

*courtesy www.countyhealthrankings.org

More than 80 hospitals, care providers and community groups in Kent County, including the Health Department, just completed a Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA) to determine health concerns that need addressing.  “These rankings, along with the CHNA, are critical in helping us determine where to focus our efforts, to make Kent County a healthier place,” said Cathy Raevsky, Administrative Health Officer for the Kent County Health Department. “The improvement in our Health Outcomes ranking in 2012 is welcome news, and we continue to work towards improving factors that impact health, especially in the areas of education, healthy eating and children living in poverty.”

The annual rankings help health care providers better understand the health problems in our communities. For more information, go to www.countyhealthrankings.org.

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Kent and Montcalm counties collaborate


Taxpayers in both counties will benefit

According to Kent County Administrator/Controller Daryl Delabbio, saving money while delivering top notch services continues to be a top priority in West Michigan. With this in mind, Kent County and Montcalm County plan to enter an agreement where Kent County will provide Equalization services for Montcalm County.

Montcalm County is required by state law to have an Equalization Director certified as a Michigan Master Assessing Officer (4). Kent County’s Equalization Director has the required MMAO (4) designation. Rather than hire a new director, Montcalm contacted Kent County, to see if there was a more cost-effective solution. The counties reached an agreement to contract with Kent County for this need for the next year. Montcalm County will pay Kent County for the services rendered.

Delabbio said Kent County has a long history of collaborating with other government units, and after looking at the additional effort required, found that collaborating with Montcalm would be beneficial to both counties. He believes that efficiencies can be gained while saving taxpayers in both counties money.

“The economic realities of the past decade mean we have to look for ways to be lean,” said Delabbio. “We see this as one more way to use tax dollars efficiently and effectively through collaboration.”

Kent County Equalization Director Matt Woolford will work one day a week from Montcalm County offices in Stanton while maintaining connections to both county offices. “The equalization staff at Montcalm has been doing a good job during this period of vacancy,” Woolford said. “I look forward to working with the Assessors and staff in Montcalm County.”

Equalization is responsible for property appraisal and mapping functions on behalf of taxpayers and municipalities. The staff updates property descriptions for area municipalities, creates map products and maintains property information records for reference by local municipalities, title companies, realtors, developers, surveyors, environmental companies, architectural and engineering firms and the general public.

 

 

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Home Invasions on the rise across the county


The Kent County Sheriff Department reported late last week that there have been many home break-ins throughout Kent County recently.
Many have occurred in rural areas where homes are not close together. Daytime home break-ins have occurred everywhere: Algoma, Cannonsburg, Lowell and Byron Townships. Break-ins occur at all times of day, in any season and in all neighborhoods.
The KCSD asks resident to please be aware of, and report, any suspicious persons or vehicles. When possible, write down license plate numbers.
They advise you to protect your home by being discrete. Don’t advertise your items of value. Keep valuables out of plain sight of doors and windows. If you are throwing away boxes or bags that depict valuable items such as TVs, computers or jewelry, make sure they fit in you trash or recycling can. Cut or shred as much information as possible.
Keep all exterior doors and windows locked. Make sure your home is well lit. Keep criminals guessing as to whether or not you are home. Utilize interior lights and, if possible, different lights through-out the home when you are not home.
Keep an eye on your neighbor’s house as well and report anything out of the ordinary.
To report any crimes or suspicious activity, call the Kent County Sheriff’s Department at 632-6100 or 911.

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Golf course break-ins


Over the past few weeks the Kent County Sheriff Department has investigated at least six golf course break-ins in the eastern and southeastern portions of Kent County. In each of the break-ins, suspects have forced their way in to either the pro shop or storage buildings and targeted merchandise or cash.  Investigators believe the break-ins are related and the Kent County Sheriff Department is asking for the public’s help in identifying either of the subjects pictured.

The first suspect was seen at one of the break-ins wearing mostly white. He is described as a white male, with a tall thin build. The suspect has dark hair and wears glasses. He had a unique hat on with a short bill, similar to that of a train engineer. Headphones can also be seen around the top of the hat.  See the first two pictures below.

The second suspect was seen wearing a dark shirt with lighter colored pants. He is described as a white male, shorter than the first suspect, with a thin build. He also was wearing a hat which was dark in color and a dark colored bag with a shoulder strap.

Any information can be forwarded to Silent Observer 1-866-774-2345 or to Detective Roon at 616-632-6142.

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