web analytics

Tag Archive | "halloween"

A Spooky snack and drink for Halloween


Monster Mash Float

Monster Mash Float

Family Features

If your family’s Halloween consists of pumpkin carving, trick-or-treating and transforming your home into a haunted house, you’ll be happy to know that the “double, double, toil and trouble” doesn’t have to stop there. You can add a little extra hocus pocus to your season by brewing up these chillingly creative treats with the whole family.

The Monster Mash Float and Paranormal Pudding are two ghoulishly good treats that kids and adults alike will love, and they’re easy to make. The fun is all in the Limited Edition TruMoo Orange Scream milk. Inspired by an orange frozen pop with vanilla ice cream, this new creamy orange milk is so frightfully delicious, it’s sure to make you scream. Because it’s made with wholesome low-fat white milk, no artificial growth hormones or high fructose corn syrup, and is brought to you by your local trusted TruMoo dairy, you can feel great about serving it to your family.

TruMoo Orange Scream is delicious as an ingredient in your favorite Halloween treats or served by itself. Just make sure to drink it fast—it might disappear into the night like the headless horseman.

For more frightening fun visit www.TruMoo.com, www.facebook.com/TruMooMilk, www.twitter.com/TruMooMilk and www.pinterest.com/TruMooMilk.

 

Monster Mash Float

Servings: 1

1 cup TruMoo Orange Scream milk

1 large scoop low-fat vanilla frozen yogurt or ice cream

1 cup chilled seltzer

In tall glass, pour in milk. Add scoop of frozen yogurt. Slowly add seltzer to create foamy, web-like effect on top of float.

Serve immediately.

Paranormal Pudding

Paranormal Pudding

Paranormal Pudding

Servings: 2

2 cups TruMoo Orange Scream milk

1 (3.4-ounce) box instant vanilla pudding and pie filling

1/2 cup low-fat granola

2 tablespoons low-fat plain Greek yogurt

Multicolored sprinkles

In large bowl, with wire whisk beat milk and instant pudding until well blended and thickened.

Spoon 1/3 of pudding mixture into two dessert or parfait glasses; sprinkle with some granola. Repeat layering two more times. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

To serve, top each with dollop of yogurt and Halloween-themed sprinkles.

 

Posted in Halloween fun, RecipesComments (0)

Halloween Happenings


Halloween-leadin

Check out some of the fun, fall activities going on in our area for Halloween!

 

MCC Haunted Indoor Forest

Oct. 24, 25: Montcalm Community College Art Club hosts a Haunted Indoor Forest from 6-8 p.m. on Friday, October 24 and Saturday, October 25 from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Instruction North Building, on the college’s Sidney campus. A $2 donation is suggested.

Harvest Brains at Sand Lake/Nelson Library

Oct. 25: Program for teens, at 1:30 p.m., Saturday, October 25. Save your brains! Build a survival bag, practice your aim, and learn what it takes to stay alive during a zombie apocalypse. The library is located at 88 Eighth St., Sand Lake.

Harvest party

Oct. 25: Cedar Creek Community Church, at 2969 14 Mile RD NE Sparta, will host a harvest party on Saturday, October 25, from 5-8 p.m. There will be hayrides (using straw due to allergies), pumpkin painting, dunking for apples, cake walk, games, face painting, soup, hot dogs, popcorn, and lots of fun! All are welcome. Call 866-9829 for more info.

Pumpkin Carving and Lit Trails Walk

Oct. 25: Pumpkin/Carving and Pumpkin lit trail hike from 5-8:30 p.m. at Howard Christensen Nature Center, 16290 Red Pine Dr., Kent City, on Saturday, October 25. Suggested donation is $8 per person or $30 for family of four or more, including pumpkin to take home. (No one turned away for inability to pay. This donation helps keep HCNC operating.) Pumpkin carving from 5 to 6:30 p.m. and pumpkin lit walk through our spooky Enchanted Forest from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. (Friendly enough for your toddlers. Non scary animals will be on display in the forest, weather permitting for the mock-animals). Includes pumpkin to take home or leave at the center for the wild animals to munch on. Dress up as your favorite nature character. Open to all ages.

Trunk ‘r Treat at Courtland-Oakfield UMC 

Oct. 25: It’s our fourth annual Trunk ‘r Treat for kids of all ages. Saturday, October 25, 5:30-7:00 p.m. at Courtland-Oakfield United Methodist Church, 10295 Myers Lake NE. Candy outdoors; hot dogs & baked beans indoors.

Trunk or Treat at East Nelson UMC

Oct. 25: Bring your kids and come “Trunk or Treat” at East Nelson UM Church, 9024 18 Mile Rd., Cedar Springs on Saturday, October 25 from 5-7 p.m. Warm up with hot chocolate and sloppy joes. Games and fun for all.

Fall Festival  

Oct. 29: Fall Festival for all ages at the Solon Center Wesleyan Church, 15671 Algoma Ave., Cedar Springs on Wednesday, October 29, from 6:30- 8 p.m. For families with children 5th grade and under. Games, prizes, snacks, boy and girl door prizes and candy, candy, candy! The church is located on Algoma, just north of 19 Mile Road.

Nightmare on Cherry Street

Oct. 30: Calling all 4th to 6th graders!  You are officially invited to come to our “Nightmare on Cherry Street” party at the Cedar Springs Library! The fun, games, and food will begin at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, October 30 and go until 7:30. Registration is required, so come into the library to sign up or call 616-696-1910

Trick or Treat Trail Walk

Oct. 31: From 3-5 p.m. on Halloween, bring your kiddos by Howard Christensen Nature Center, 16290 Red Pine Dr., Kent City, to take a short walk down one of our trails to collect some candy, so we don’t get tricked!

Cedar Springs Spooktacular

Oct. 31:  The Cedar Springs Area Chamber of Commerce, businesses and churches in Cedar Springs are sponsoring the annual Main Street Halloween Spooktacular on Friday, October 31. Some of the free events include: spooky storytelling and crafts at the Cedar Springs Public Library, 4:30 p.m.; a haunted school house at the Cedar Springs Historical Museum in Morley Park 5-7 p.m.; a Kids Carnival, hosted by Calvary Assembly of God 5-7 p.m.; Trick-or-Treating at local businesses between 5-7pm; and Trunk or Treat at The Springs Church from 6 to 8 p.m. (see more details below).

Kids carnival

Oct. 31: Calvary Assembly of God will be presenting a free carnival during the Chamber of Commerce’s Spooktacular event from 5-7pm on Friday, October 31. The carnival will be at the corner of Ash and Main Street, next to DJ Nails, and will have lots of family-friendy games, with prizes and candy.

Haunted school house

Oct. 31: The Haunted School House is back this year at the Cedar Springs Historical Museum in Morley Park from 5-7 p.m. again. Nolan Patin has worked up another fun spooky event for the museum. We do adapt our spookiness when young children are coming through and will be handing out treats.

Trunk or Treat at The Springs

Oct. 31: Creative costumes—check. Oodles of goodies—check. Lots of giggles and loads of fun—doublecheck! You’ll experience it all at The Springs Church at Trunk or Treat on Halloween night from 6 to 8 p.m. There will be lots of candy for the taking, carnival games, a giant slide, and refreshments. It will be fun for the whole family, and a safe, well-lit environment for kids. The church is located at 135 N. Grant St., in Cedar Springs.

Traffic Squad/Fire Department

Oct. 31: There will be cider, donuts and candy at the Cedar Springs Fire Department on Maple Street from 5 to 7 p.m. or while supplies last.

Halloween Hospitality Center

Oct. 31: Warm up station at the Cedar Springs United Methodist Church, 140 S. Main Street, Cedar Springs, on Friday, October 31, from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Serving hot chocolate and popcorn, everyone is welcome to join us.

Halloween party – Courtland Fire

Oct 31:  Stop by the Halloween party at the Courtland Fire station #2, 9535 Myers Lake road from 5-9 p.m. Games, snacks candy, cider, coffee,  car trunks with treats welcome. Sponsored by women auxiliary, and many stores in the area.

Family Harvest Celebration

Oct. 31: Pine Ridge Bible Camp invites you to its annual Family Harvest Celebration on Friday, October 31, from 6 to 8 p.m. This free event includes hayride, games, puppet show, cider, donuts and trip through Treat Town. Please bring a bag for collecting treats. It is a fun night for the whole family. Costumes welcome but not necessary. Please no witches, ghosts, monsters, etc. Pine Ridge is located just 5 miles east of town at 8415 17 Mile Rd. Call 616-696-8675 for more information.

Trunk or Treat at Crossfire Church

Oct. 31: Trunk or Treat at Crossfire Church, 4780 Cornfield Drive, Cedar Springs, from 6-8 p.m. There will be games and prizes, candy for the kids, hot dogs and chips available.

Ghostbusters at the Kent Theatre

Oct. 31, Nov. 1, Nov.2: Don’t let the Halloween weekend go by without spending some time at the Kent Theatre. A special showing of Ghostbusters will be on the big screen October 31, November 1 and 2, in celebration of Ghostbusters 30th Anniversary. Now in digital format, watch your favorite ghost busting team in action! Showing Halloween night at 6 and 9 p.m., Saturday at 3, 6 and 9 p.m. and Sunday at 3 and 6 pm. Tickets are only $3.00.

Sand Lake Fire Department

Oct. 31: The Sand Lake Fireman’s Association will host their annual Halloween festivities at the fire station at 2 Maple Street in Sand Lake from 6-8 p.m. There will be games, a bounce house, prize drawings, goody bags, cider, donuts, and coffee. There will also be a costume contest. Judging is at 7:15, must be present to win the contest. Call 636-8854 for more info.

Trick or Treat at Meadowlark

Oct. 31: Meadowlark Retirement Village in Sparta loves having trick or treaters. Their doors will be open from 6-8 p.m. on Friday, October 31. The residents can’t wait to see all the kids dressed up! Meadowlark is located at 65 Ida Red Ave, Sparta. Call 887-8891 ext. 102 for more info.

 

 

 

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, Featured, Halloween funComments (0)

Fresh Market: The Pumpkin—a Halloween tradition


HAL-FreshMarket-Pumpkin

By Vicky Babcock

Google “pumpkin” and you will find everything from riots in (Keene) New Hampshire to Ichabod Crane’s unfortunate encounter with the headless horseman, to pumpkin scones. We have pumpkin festivals, pumpkin carving contests, smashing pumpkins, pumpkin tossing, pumpkin baking and biggest pumpkin contests.

A true Native American, the pumpkin has been embraced by our cultures as both an important food source for people and livestock, and an excellent medium for carving. Something about these colorful canvasses really stirs the creative juices in artists of all ages! Throw in a candle and you have a lovely Jack-o-lantern. With its growing season complete from early to mid October, is it any wonder that this vibrantly colored fruit has become synonymous with Halloween? Yet pumpkins have a relatively short history with the holiday known as Halloween, which is believed to have evolved from the ancient festival of Samhain. It has its origins in European culture. Samhain was the Celtic harvest festival, a time to stock up supplies for the winter. The ancient Gaels believed the final day in October to be a time when the two worlds (the living and the dead) overlapped allowing the dead to return to Earth and cause havoc among the living. Offerings from the harvest were left outside their doors to appease the spirits in an effort to prevent them from bringing sickness and blight to the crops. Door to door begging, or “souling,” (a precursor to our modern day trick-or-treat) came much later and was associated with All Souls Day.

Our native pumpkin entered into the holiday when Irish immigrants brought the tradition of the Jack-o-lantern—originally a carved turnip or gourd—to the U.S. during the 1700s. Turnips had their drawbacks; they were relatively small and dense, with no pre-formed cavity in which to place a lit coal. With its broad base and large capacity, the pumpkin quickly became the preferred medium for the practice. Today, a large percentage of fresh bought pumpkins lends itself to this Halloween tradition, decorating our porches and giving young artists a chance to stretch their creative wings. Once used as a welcoming light for the spirits of our loved ones and to ward off any malevolent spirits, the Jack-o-Lantern has become a Halloween fantasy, a joyful pastime and a profitable market for farmers of the crop. Unfortunately, few of us these days consume pumpkin that does not come out of a can.

Unfortunate, because pumpkin, one of the winter squashes, is an excellent source of dietary nutrition. Pumpkins are rich in beta-carotene, an important antioxidant, which the body uses to convert to vitamin A. Foods rich in beta-carotene have been linked to lower risk of certain cancers and offer protection against heart disease as well as an aid in the degenerative aspects of aging. Pumpkin is high in potassium and dietary fiber as well, necessary nutrients for the heart and digestive tract respectively. A cup of cooked pumpkin contains about 49 calories, a dieter’s dream!

So, as you carve your pumpkins this year, consider using the cut outs (minus the rind) in soups, stews or rice dishes. Or try some pumpkin chili. Any way you slice it, it comes out deliciously nutritious.

Like pumpkins—and despite its ancestry—Halloween is a true American treat. With the mix of cultures that make up today’s Halloween, what greater place to celebrate than the Great Melting Pot of the world? Have a safe and happy Halloween. And happy “souling.”

 

Pumpkin Chili

1 ½ pounds lean ground beef

1 medium onion, chopped

2 cloves garlic, diced

2 large carrots, washed and diced (ends removed)

2 cups fresh pumpkin, peeled and diced

1 jar salsa—medium heat

1 15-oz can diced tomatoes

2 cans black beans, rinsed and drained

Chili powder (to taste)

In a large skillet, brown beef. Drain most of the oils and remove beef to a Dutch oven. In saucepan in remaining oil, cook and stir onion, garlic, carrots and pumpkin for about two minutes, until onion is tender. Drain the rest of the oil and add to the beef. Add remaining ingredients except for the chili powder. Cook and stir until boiling. Reduce heat and add chili powder to taste. This will gain some heat as it cooks, so start lightly. Cook over med to low heat about 30 minutes or until pumpkin is tender and flavors have mixed. Add additional chili powder about 15 minutes into the cooking process if you wish.

Serve with grated cheese, crushed corn chips (I like Frito’s™ Chili Cheese) and sour cream if desired. Other additions include chopped fresh onions or chopped bell peppers. This is even better the next day.

Fresh Market is brought to you by Solon Market located at 15185 Algoma Avenue.  For more information call 616-696-1718.  Like us on facebook for updates.

 

 

Posted in Awesome Autumn, Halloween fun, RecipesComments (0)

Trick or treat in Cedar Springs


 

Are you ready to trick or treat in Cedar Springs?

Are you ready to trick or treat in Cedar Springs?

It’s only one week until Halloween—are you ready for a night full of fun? Does the thought greeting scores of trick or treaters make you break out in a cold sweat? Forget staying home! Pack up the kids and come out Halloween night for the Annual Cedar Springs Halloween Spooktacular in Cedar Springs! Sponsored by the Cedar Springs Area Chamber of Commerce, area businesses and churches, the fun starts at 4:30 p.m. with spooky storytime at the library, at the corner of Cherry and Second. That is followed by trick or treating from 5 to 7 p.m. at Main Street businesses.

The Kent County Sheriff Traffic Squad will hand out hot chocolate and donuts at the Cedar Springs firebarn at W. Maple and Second St. again this year, and the Cedar Springs Historical Museum will host a haunted school house at the museum in Morley Park. Calvary Assembly of God will host a carnival at Main and Ash, and The Springs Church will host Trunk-or-Treat from 6pm-8pm, in their parking lot at the corner of Maple and First Street, along with a giant slide, and refreshments. For more info, see ad below.

N-CSHalloweenSpooktacular

 

 

Posted in Featured, NewsComments (0)

The Trick to the Treats


By Ronnie McBrayer

By Ronnie McBrayer

That faint noise you hear is the sound of pint-sized spooks gathering on your lawn. They will soon be knocking at the door, plastic pumpkins outstretched. Spare yourself the tricks and give up the treats – the unhealthy, sweet, nougat-filled goodies in your cupboard. Keep your stinking apples, raisins, toothbrushes, and granola bars. In a few short years the tykes will have to turn in their costumes, so don’t deprive them of this rite of childhood passage.

This doesn’t mean adults don’t get in on the fun. Americans spend nearly $3 billion each Halloween, not on adorning their children for the festivities, but on themselves. Adults love to play dress-up, it would appear, and not just in October.

We all hide behind masks, masks we have worn for so long, we forget the real person who lurks beneath. We so over-identify with our dress-up characters, that is the roles we play in life, that when the roles change—and they will change—we experience miserable frustration.

One Halloween my son dressed as the cartoon spaceman Buzz Lightyear for Halloween. It was fun—“To infinity and beyond!”—and that’s how long I thought the boy would wear the costume. In his mind, this wasn’t a temporary role he was playing. Buzz Lightyear was who he really was. Every time he had to lay aside his costume, it was the proverbial end of the world with weeping and gnashing of teeth. It was as if he was losing himself, as if he couldn’t live apart from that imaginary facade. Of course the real him was beneath that rayon spacesuit—everybody knew it—except him.

This is a common affliction. We build dramatic images of ourselves, who we think we are, who we should be, what we should accomplish, and once constructed, these have to be maintained and protected. We never let a tear or a crack show in our veneer, and the mask to which we cling slowly becomes a prison. We go through life kicking and screaming every time a perceived threat begins to pull at the hem of our make-believe cape.

Here’s a better way: Fulfill the roles that God, fate, or life has assigned to you. Fulfill them with gusto. But never accept the masks you must wear as a substitute for the person you really are; that’s the trick to a sweet life.

Ronnie McBrayer is a syndicated columnist, blogger, pastor, and author of multiple books. Visit his website at www.ronniemcbrayer.me.

 

Posted in Keeping the FaithComments (0)

Zombies take over Grand Rapids 


 

October 25 – Halloween nighttime 5K race is one of only a few in the U.S.

The 3rd annual Zombie Dash will be held Saturday, October 25, 2014, at Ah-Nab-Awen Park in downtown Grand Rapids. The run, with waves from 6:30 to 7:00 p.m., features a 5K course along the Grand River, including “Apocalypse Avenue,” full of junked cars and “Kill Hill,” a challenging climb up the tallest hill in Grand Rapids.

“It’s a 5K run at night, but it is definitely more than just a run,” said Mark VanTongeren, co-owner and race director of Michigan Adventure Racing LLC. “Its part run, part obstacle course and part haunted house.”

The race pits survivors against the undead in a 5K run occurring between 6:30 and 7:00 p.m. Runners follow a course along the Grand River. “Runners have three flag-football life strips to keep from the zombies, and each strip they keep gets them a minute shaved off their time,” said VanTongeren. “The runners have the most fun at Apocalypse Avenue. We drag in old cars and have the zombies on the cars. Over 100 of our 350 zombies are in that area and the runners have to dodge them.”

The race takes place from sunset to darkness. Those beginning before sunset can almost make it home before dark if they are quick. Survivors at later start times will race as darkness falls. Runners in later waves will be required to wear a headlamp or flashlight for safety.

You can register as either a runner or a zombie. The cost for runners is $45 (kids 10 and under free with parent/guardian) and zombies “eat” for free (or $15 if they want the shirt). For info and deadlines to register, go to http://thezombiedash.com.

The charity partner for this race is the Michigan Blood Stem Cell Program, which educates the public about the importance of the Be The Match registry and marrow/stem cell donation. Last year there were over 1,200 runners and 350 zombies who participated. $5,000 was raised for Michigan Blood’s Stem Cell Program.

“We are very honored that Michigan Adventure Racing has chosen us (Michigan Blood’s Stem Cell Program) again this year and are donating part of the proceeds to help us add more donors to the Be The Match registry,” said Katie McClain, Stem Cell Recruitment Specialist and Be The Match Representative at Michigan Blood.  “Only 55 percent of sick people find a match, so adding more to the registry will help find more matches, give hope, and ultimately save lives. Through recruitment efforts at last year’s race, a donor was matched with a 10-year-old boy needing a stem cell transplant which saved his life.”

Posted in Arts & EntertainmentComments (0)

A Spooktacular Halloween


Trunk or treat at The Springs was a big hit with trick-or-treaters. They offered a kid carnival, lots of candy, and free hot dogs, donuts, cookies, cider, hot chocolate and coffee. Photo by Landon Prater.

Trunk or treat at The Springs was a big hit with trick-or-treaters. They offered a kid carnival, lots of candy, and free hot dogs, donuts, cookies, cider, hot chocolate and coffee. Photo by Landon Prater.

 Trick-or-treaters on Main Street during the Spooktacular on Halloween night. Photo from the Cedar Springs Area Chamber of Commerce.

Trick-or-treaters on Main Street during the Spooktacular on Halloween night. Photo from the Cedar Springs Area Chamber of Commerce.

It rained during the day and into the evening last Thursday, October 31, but that didn’t keep the little ghouls and goblins away. And that’s a good thing—because the businesses and churches in Cedar Springs were ready for trick-or-treaters!

More than 40 businesses, churches and non-profits were part of the Halloween Spooktacular last week, which was put on and organized the Cedar Springs Area Chamber of Commerce. The evening included a haunted house at the Cedar Springs Museum’s schoolhouse, storytime at the library, a scavenger hunt and lots of trick-or-treating. While some outdoor events were cancelled because of the weather, The Springs Church moved its Trunk or Treat and kids carnival inside, and estimates that about 1,500 people flowed through their doors over the course the evening.

The Post was one of the many businesses handing out candy, and we thank you for coming to see us! Check out our Halloween album at https://www.facebook.com/cedarspringspost

 

Posted in Featured, NewsComments Off

Homecoming at Cedar Springs High School


Kendra Coons, Cedar Springs High School Class of 2014

 

With Halloween comes pumpkins, scary costumes, candy, and this year, Cedar Springs High School’s Homecoming. Based on timing, Homecoming and Halloween fell only two weeks apart. So the SAC department decided to incorporate Halloween into Homecoming for 2013. This year’s theme was “Haunted Homecoming”.   The theme involved spider webs, broken glass, and plenty of scary decorations. The students of CSHS geared up for the big day by participating in spirit days, decorating the hallways and cafeteria, cheering on our Red Hawks at the Homecoming football game, and concluding with the Homecoming dance.

Students loved participating in this year’s spirit days. Students dressed in pajamas on Monday, as their favorite superhero on Tuesday, beach and Hawaiian attire on Wednesday, matching with another student on twin day Thursday, and the traditional class color day Friday. This year, participation in spirit days skyrocketed. The Student Activities Council (SAC) really tried to promote school wide participation.

Cedar Springs students also searched the school for the “spirit ball competition”. A big red football hidden somewhere within the school, and the objective of the competition is to find it. The Sophomores and Juniors each found it one day, and Seniors found it three days.

Students spent two evenings decorating hallways for their respective classes. In the end, Seniors took first, Juniors came in second, Sophomores came in third, and Freshmen came in last. When it all came down to the end, the Seniors, Class of 2014, ended up winning the Homecoming competition and receiving the spirit jug.

To conclude the school week, the Cedar Springs Red Hawk varsity football team took the field for their annual Homecoming game. The Red Hawks went up against the Falcons of West Catholic. At halftime, Homecoming court was announced. Collin Alvesteffer and Lindsay Lehman accepted Homecoming prince and princess for the Freshman class. John Grisby and Jesseka Ruiter accepted the award for the Sophomore class.  John Shaw and Shayne Mann accepted the title for the Junior class. Senior Homecoming court members included Kenzie Francis, Mitchel Hanmer, Austin Hilyer, Cameron Klompstra, Jeff Newland, Kim Pasley, Taylor Vanlangen, and Sayge Wight. Morgan Bennett was crowned Queen and Ian Murphy was crowned King. Although the Red Hawks put up a good fight, the Falcons took home the win, defeating Cedar Springs 36-14.

The dance then took place on Saturday, Oct. 12. Upon arrival, administrators placed wristbands on all students’ wrists. This was the first year that CSHS incorporated wristbands into the dance, in following with other schools in the OK Bronze conference. The “wristband rule” was started to reduce the amount of inappropriate dancing that occurs at school-sponsored dances. If a student was caught dancing inappropriately, their wristband was immediately cut off. If a student was caught dancing inappropriately without a wristband, the student was asked to leave the dance immediately. Many administrators, teachers, and students agree that the wristband rule did reduce the amount of inappropriate dancing.

The students and administrators worked hard to make “Haunted Homecoming” a week to remember.

Posted in Cedar Springs Public SchoolsComments Off

Trick or treat in Cedar Spring—indoors and out


Are you ready to trick or treat in Cedar Springs?

Are you ready to trick or treat in Cedar Springs?

Are you ready for a night full of fun? Don’t let the forecast of rain keep you home Halloween night—there will be plenty of fun both indoors and out at the annual Cedar Springs Halloween Spooktacular in downtown Cedar Springs! Sponsored by the Cedar Springs Area Chamber of Commerce, area businesses and churches, the fun starts at 4:30 p.m. with spooky storytime inside the library, at the corner of Cherry and Second, and a scavenger hunt by En Gedi that starts at City Hall. That is followed by trick or treating from 5 to 7 p.m. at almost 40 Main Street businesses—so bring your umbrella!

If you are looking for more indoor activities, The Springs Church, located at 135 N. Grant Street, will host their Trunk or Treat inside the church. Calvary Assembly God will also hold their kids carnival inside at The Springs. There will be lots of candy for the taking, games, hot chocolate, cider and donuts. It will be fun for the whole family!

The Cedar Springs Fire Department will hand out hot chocolate and donuts at the firebarn at W. Maple and Second St. again this year, and the Cedar Springs Historical Museum will host a haunted school house inside the museum in Morley Park for the first time.

The En Gedi youth center’s “Ghost in the graveyard” at North Park (NE corner of Pine and Main) will be canceled if it rains.

Come see us at The Post! We will be handing out candy, along with many other businesses. Check out all the businesses and non-profits handing out candy this year on or just off Main Street (starting at the south end):

Cedar Street: The Cedar Springs Historical Museum

Between Muskegon (17 Mile) and Church Streets: Family Video, Hungry Howie’s, CS Family Chiropractic, Main Street Restaurant, Awesome Tan, and Admiral.

Between Church and Beech Streets: Amish Warehouse, McBride Accounting, United Methodist Church.

Between Beech and Ash Streets: American Legion, The Cedar Pub.

Between Ash and Cherry Streets: D&J Nails, Traveler’s Trunk, Link Wireless, The Hair Craft Company, Alpha Omega Coffee and Games, Round Up Tavern, Take Two Game Shop.

Between Cherry and Elm Streets: The Cedar Springs Public Library (Cherry Street), The Kent Theatre, Vitale’s Pizza, The Gun Tavern.

Between Elm and Maple Streets: Curves, Cedar Chest, Homemade Ceramics, Car Quest, Frog’s Legendary Billiards; Perry’s Place, Cedar Springs Fire Department (W. Maple), The Cedar Springs Post (E. Maple), and The Springs Church (driveways off E. Maple and First Streets).

Pine Street and North: Wesco, B&H Sporting Goods, Cedar Springs Tire, Dollar General, KC’s Kones and Coneys, Kelly’s Restaurant, Vanderhyde Ford.

 

 

Posted in Featured, NewsComments (1)

No Tricks or Treats for Pets this Halloween


By Mona Shand, Michigan News Connection

HAL-No-tricks-or-treats-for-pets

Halloween is one of the most fun-filled nights for kids of all ages, but unless pet owners take precautions, the holiday could pose serious risks for four-legged friends. When trick-or-treaters bring home the Halloween loot, most people know to keep the chocolate away from pets, but, according to veterinarian Dr. Jamie Snow, keep the whole candy bowl out of reach of Rover and Fluffy, because the artificial sweetener xylitol found in most sugar-free gums and many other candies can be fatal to animals.

“I won’t let it in my house,” she declared. “If a dog eats that and ingests it in a good enough amount, it can cause severe liver failure and very profoundly low blood sugar and kill them.”

Snow said Halloween safety begins with securing pets inside the house or in a place where they won’t get overexcited by an onslaught of children, and to be sure all animals have proper identification. It’s all too easy for pets to escape amid all the Halloween commotion, but Snow says a few simple precautions will greatly increase the chance an animal will be reunited with its owner if that happens.

“Almost on a weekly basis, we have somebody that finds a dog or a cat with no collar, no microchip, and it’s very hard to find their homes if they have no identification,” she warned.

As for dressing pets up in Halloween costumes, Snow said to treat animals the same as toddlers: beware of choking or breathing hazards, and don’t leave them unsupervised while they’re suited up.

Posted in Halloween funComments Off