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Tag Archive | "Fresh Market"

Fresh Market


BLOOM-RosemaryBy Vicky Babcock

“There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance.”—William Shakespeare

Rosemary’s long time association with weddings and funerals probably stems from this complex herb’s ability to aid in mental activity—thus rosemary for remembrance. Students in Rome wore wreaths of rosemary to improve their test scores—indeed modern studies seem to support this belief. Studies have indicated that this pungent herb may help in the delay or prevention of Alzhetimer’s or age related memory loss. It is a digestive aid as well. It improves mood, respiratory function and circulation and boosts the immune system. It has anti-bacterial and anti-oxidant properties. Rosemary was burned as an incense to protect against the plague and later in France during WWII in hospitals to protect against infectious diseases. The herb is an excellent source of iron, and contains about 83 percent RDA per 100 grams of fresh leaves.

Folk stories abound around this herb. It is associated with the Greek goddess Aphrodite, who is said to have worn a drapery of rosemary when she ascended from the sea. The Virgin Mary is said to have spread her cloak over a rosemary bush as she rested and the flowers, once white, took on the blue of the cloak. Thus the bush received its name, “Rose of Mary.”

Rosemary actually gets its name from the Latin Rosmarinus, dew of the sea.

One 16th century belief states that in homes and gardens where rosemary grows in abundance, the woman rules the household. This caused a bit of consternation among the men, who began ripping out rosemary bushes to prove that they, not their wives, ruled the roost. Sorting fact from fiction can be a bit tricky at times, as in the belief that rosemary placed under one’s pillow will prevent nightmares. This indeed may be true as the herb’s scent improves mood. Whatever your beliefs, consider adding fresh rosemary to your supply of culinary herbs. Its unique flavor will surprise and delight you. And tuck a sprig into your lapel as well. It just may keep the thieves—and the witches—away.

Cautionary note: Women who are pregnant are advised against using rosemary in large quantities. Check with your doctor.

Rosemary Pecan Onion Bread

2 cups milk

2 pkg. dry yeast

¾ cup finely chopped onion

2 tsp. salt

½ cup butter

5-6 cups flour

2 T. honey

¾ cup toasted pecan pieces

Vegetable oil cooking spray

2-4 fresh rosemary leaves, coarsely chopped

In small saucepan, combine milk, onion, butter, honey and salt. Cook over medium heat until butter melts. Cool mixture to about 100 degrees (warm to touch, but not hot)  Dissolve yeast in warm mixture.

In a large bowl, combine 5 cups flour and yeast mixture. Stir to form a soft dough.Turn onto floured surface—using additional flour as needed, knead dough until it becomes smooth and elastic, about five minutes. Add pecans and rosemary, kneading to incorporate.

Place dough in a large bowl that has been sprayed with cooking spray—turn once to coat dough. Cover and allow to rise in a warm place for about 45 minutes. Turn dough onto a lightly floured surface and punch down. Divide into thirds, shaping each into a round loaf.  Place on lightly greased baking sheets—cover and allow to rise in a warm place 20-25 minutes.

Score tops of bread with a sharp knife to form an x. Lightly brush tops with water—bake in pre-heated 375◦ oven about 25 minutes until golden. Serve warm or cool completely on a wire rack.

 

Fresh Market is brought to you by Solon Market located at 15185 Algoma Avenue.  For more information call 616-696-1718.  Like us on facebook for updates.

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Fresh Market


BLOOM-blueberry-sorbetBy Vicky Babcock

In early America, Native Americans traded “star berries” to colonists who believed them to be some form of bilberry, a fruit found in the United Kingdom. While similar and likely related, blueberries are native to North America. Blueberries, with the highest anti-oxidant content of all fresh fruits, are an excellent nutritional choice in your diet. Heart healthy, vision aid, memory aid, cancer preventative (consumption of blueberries has been found to reduce the risk of colon cancer and ovarian cancer), anti-depressant, and anti-aging agent—blueberries may very well be that fountain of youth so sought by Ponce de Leon! Blueberries can aid in the prevention of cell-damage, lower cholesterol and reduce body fat, reduce digestive inflammation and prevent infection.
It was said during World War II that RAF pilots consumed bilberry jam to improve their night vision. While this has since been proved to be false—a story created by the Brits to confuse their enemies when radar was first used—it was plausible because consumption of bilberries, as well as our native blueberries, can prevent or delay age related ocular problems such as macular degeneration, cataracts, myopia  and dryness and infections, especially those pertaining to the retina.
While claims of improved night vision have been made, we could find nothing to support this. Even so, blueberries are a nutritional powerhouse that should not be ignored.  Eat these tasty treats fresh or straight out of the freezer, add them to cereals or pancakes, or try any number of recipes found on the net. Remember, the darker the berry, the more antioxidant and other nutritional value.

Blueberry Sorbet

Ingredients:
2/3 cup granulated sugar
1/3 cup whole lemon verbena leaves or lemon balm (optional)
1 pound frozen blueberries
1/3 cup fresh lemon juice
2 Tablespoons lemon-flavored rum (optional)
Preparation:
Process sugar and lemon verbena in food processor or blender for about 30 seconds.   Add blueberries and process an additional minute.  Add lemon juice and rum:  process until smooth.  Serve immediately or freeze in a covered freezer container.
Yield: 4 servings. 

Per Serving: 209 calories; 0.4 g fat (0 g saturated fat; 2 percent calories from fat); 50 g carbohydrates; 0 mg cholesterol; 7 mg sodium; 0.9 g protein; 2.9 g fiber.
Brought to you by Solon Market located at 15185 Algoma Avenue.  For more information call 616-696-1718.  Like us on facebook for updates.

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Fresh Market


BLOOM-Fresh-market-lavenderBy Vicky Babcock

 

Lavender’s blue, dilly dilly, lavender’s green, when you are king, dilly dilly, I shall be queen.

You may think we are deviating from our theme of fresh edible foods. Not so. Lavender, most widely known for its use in aromatherapy products, is an edible herb—both its leaves and buds can be used in that capacity. Once a favorite choice for the chefs of kings, lavender somehow fell from the list of common cooking herbs.

Common it is not. Lavender’s unique flavor lends itself well to dishes with chicken or fish, but it is also used to enhance the flavor of cookies and lemonades. If you are trying out lavender for the first time, a light hand is best as its flavor can be overpowering.

Lavender originated in the Mediterranean, where it remains a wild herb as well as a cultivated plant. Referred to as Spikenard in the Bible, lavender is believed to be the oil used to anoint the feet of Jesus. From the root word “lave” (to wash), lavender has been used for that purpose since the written word. It is a natural astringent, mild bug repellant, aid to relaxation and headache reliever.

Check out next week’s Post for more on this versatile plant and try a sample of our recipe at Market. Have a happy holiday!

 

Lavender Shortbread

1 ½ cups sifted flour

¾ cup confectioners sugar

¼ teaspoon salt

½ lb. butter, softened to room temp.

2 tbsp. Fresh lavender buds or 1 tbsp.

dried culinary lavender, roughly chopped

Preheat oven to 325º f.

Mix all ingredients together. Knead until consistency becomes doughy.  Press firmly into shortbread mold (or pie plate) making sure to fill in all the space in the shortbread mold. Bake 1 hour. (Shortbread should be pale in color—not brown)  Unmold while still warm. Great warm or room temp.

 

Fresh Market is brought to you by Solon  Market located at 15185 Algoma Avenue.  For more information call 616-696-1718.  Like us on facebook for updates.

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Fresh Market – Sugar snap peas


*BLOOM-Fresh market sugarsnaps

Imagine a product with a satisfying crunch and a lovely flavor—and get this—you can eat as much as you want with no weight gain!  Enter the sugar pea.  Sugar peas are a free food to dieters, containing only 41 calories per cup. chopped raw.  They are believed to have originated in Europe where aristocrats in France began eating the immature peas, pods and all.  Sugar peas are very high in vitamins C and  A—one cup provides nearly 100% of your daily needs of vitamin C.  Rich in fiber , consumption of these treats helps reduce blood cholesterol levels, obesity, and constipation.

While sugar peas are a treat fresh picked from the garden, they also enhance any salad and are a great addition to stir fries.  The tender shoots can also be used in this capacity.  Sugar peas are planted early in the season as they cannot tolerate excessive heat.  There is also a second planting in August for a fall harvest.  This planting, however does not traditionally produce as well as Spring crops.  If you decide to plant your own, don’t forget that deer like them too!

 

Easy stir-fry

½ pound sugar peas, strings removed

1 T. olive oil

1 green onion, chopped (green parts also)

Toasted sesame seeds

In a heated stir fry pan toss sugar peas with olive oil—cook until tender crisp, about 3 minutes. Add green onion and stir fry until onion is tender. Toss with sesame seed.  Serve alone or with rice or as a side to pork or chicken dishes.

Fresh Market is brought to you by Solon Market located at 15185 Algoma Avenue. For more information call 616-696-1718. Like them on facebook for updates.

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