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Tag Archive | "fishing"

Fishing guides need permit on lakes and streams


The Department of Natural Resources reminds fishing guides who utilize state-owned lands to access Michigan’s inland lakes or streams as part of their commercial operation that they are required to have written permission from the DNR prior to using state- owned lands.

Since 2006, inland fishing guides in Michigan have been required to obtain written permission, in the form of a lease to use state-owned public water access sites.  Guides pay an annual Use of Land fee, must also provide proof of general liability insurance, and must have a state-issued inland pilot’s license or a U.S. Coast Guard captain’s license.  Use of Land fees provide funding for maintenance of state forest lands, including public-water access sites.

Michigan residents and visitors have an abundant supply of freshwater inland lakes, streams and Great Lakes that provide a variety of recreational fishing opportunities.  Annually, it is estimated that two million residents and visitors fish Michigan waters.  Michigan’s recreational fishery has an annual economic value of more than $2 billion and provides more than 15,000 jobs statewide.

For more information, contact, Brenda Mikula, DNR Parks and Recreation Division, at 231-597-0472 or visit www.michigan.gov/dnrfishing and click on Angler Information, Inland Fishing Guides, to find a link for the fishing guide lease application form.

For information on how to obtain an inland pilot license, contact, Sylvia Roossien, DNR Law Enforcement Division, at 517-241-3793.

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Free fishing weekend


The Department of Natural Resources and Environment reminds everyone that Winter Free Fishing Weekend is scheduled for Saturday, Feb 19, and Sunday, Feb. 20. On that weekend, everyone—residents and non-residents alike—can fish without a license, though all other fishing regulations apply.
Michigan has been celebrating Winter Free Fishing Weekend annually since 2000 as a way to promote awareness of the state’s aquatic resources. With more than 3,000 miles of Great Lakes shoreline, 36,000 miles of rivers and 11,000 inland lakes, Michigan and fishing are a natural match.
“Fishing is a perfect way for families to spend time together while enjoying the beautiful scenery Michigan has to offer in the wintertime,” said DNRE Director Rodney Stokes. “It is a low-cost and interactive outdoor activity—perfect for engaging children in the great outdoors.”
A number of activities at state parks have been scheduled to coincide with the weekend, while clubs, local communities and conservation organizations are also staging events. Many provide bait and free use of equipment. The events often include experienced anglers willing to introduce novices into the joy of fishing.
For a list of Free Fishing Events scheduled across the state, visit www.michigan.gov/freefishing.

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DNR certifies new state record pumpkinseed fish


OUT-Pumpkinseed-fishThe Department of Natural Resources has certified a 2.15-pound pumpkinseed caught Oct. 26 from Lake Nepessing as a state record.

Deaunti Kemp of Flint was fishing with a leaf worm on the Lapeer County lake when he caught the 12-1/2 inch sunfish. Kemp’s pumpkinseed eclipsed the record of 1.58 pounds, set in June this year from Pickerel Lake in Emmet County.

The pumpkinseed marks the fifth time a state record fish has been caught in 2009. New state benchmarks have also been set for Great Lakes muskellunge, brown trout and redear sunfish.

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Three reasons for Americans to respect hunters, anglers


National Hunting and Fishing Day is set for Sept. 26, 2009. Congress formalized the annual celebration 37 years ago but organizers say hunters and anglers deserve America’s respect now more than ever.

OUT-National-hunting-Deer-t“Recent-year surveys show nearly 8 in 10 Americans approve of hunting and more than 9 in 10 approve of fishing. That’s strong support. But, when viewed in the context of a recession and other modern headlines, our sporting traditions look even better today,” said Denise Wagner of Wonders of Wildlife museum in Springfield, Mo., the official home of NHF Day.

She added, “On NHF Day, I hope people will pause to reflect on hunter and angler contributions to society. And for those of us who’ve long understood and enjoyed these passions, share the pride by introducing someone new to hunting, fishing or shooting.”

Here are three reasons for the American public to value hunting and fishing today:

Economic Impact

No bailouts needed here. Hunting and angling together are an economic force worth $76 billion a year. In 2010, America’s economic stimulus package will generate its highest level of federal spending at $236 billion—but hunters and anglers will spend almost a third of that amount all by themselves. A Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation report shows if hunters and anglers were a nation, their Gross Domestic Product would rank 57 out of 181 countries. About 1.6 million jobs depend on hunters and anglers. Gas stations, stores, restaurants, hotels and other businesses benefit, especially in rural America. And these recreations are comparatively recession proof. In the first half of 2009, hunting and fishing license sales actually gained 7.6 and 5.4 percent, respectively, over 2008, say the National Shooting Sports Foundation and Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation.

Wildlife Management

Rabies, crop damages, nuisances. Hunting helps control these wildlife issues and many others—none more dramatic than highway accidents involving deer. White-tailed deer once were on the verge of extinction but rebounded behind historic conservation efforts. Today, deer numbers are skyrocketing. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety estimates 1.5 million deer collisions occur each year. Over 200 people are killed annually. According to a Western Transportation Institute calculation that includes costs of emergency response, injuries to driver and passengers, damages to vehicle and more, the 2009 average cost of hitting a deer is $6,600. Total public cost: $9.9 billion a year. Now consider that, nationwide, for every deer hit by a motorist, hunters take six. Imagine the human casualties and costs if hunting ended.

Conservation Funding

What if Congress announced a tax increase to cover $2 billion in annual expenses for conservation programs? Don’t worry. Hunters and anglers are already paying that tab. For the privilege of consuming surplus, renewable game and fish resources, hunters and anglers purchase licenses. They also pay special excise taxes on firearms, ammunition, bows, arrows, rods and reels. Combined, these fees generate $100,000 every 30 minutes, more than $1.75 billion per year, for wildlife, fisheries and habitat programs. Hunters and anglers also contribute another $300 million a year to nonprofit organizations that extend conservation benefits even further. Results have brought many species—turkey, elk pronghorn, Canada goose, wood duck and others—and their habitats from vanishing to flourishing. These efforts enabled restoration of other species such as wolves. America’s living landscape is a precious asset for all citizens who enjoy wildlife and wild places.

For more information, visit www.nhfday.org.

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DNR reminds anglers about bait restrictions


As salmon begin making their way up the state’s rivers from the Great Lakes, the Department of Natural Resources reminds anglers that the use of salmon eggs and minnows for bait is restricted in some waters as part of a strategy to slow the spread of viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS).

VHS, a disease that causes fish to die from internal bleeding, has caused mortalities among a number of species of fish in Michigan in both the Great Lakes and inland waters. The disease has been found and has caused fish kills in Michigan’s waters of Lake Erie and Lake Huron. VHS has been found in Lake Michigan, but not in Michigan’s waters. Inland, it has been found in Budd Lake in Clare County and in Baseline Line Lake in Washtenaw County. VHS has not been found in Lake Superior.

“Basically, if you don’t take any spawn out of the watershed it came from and you fish below the first upstream barrier from the Great Lakes, you are legal,” said DNR fisheries biologist Gary Whelan.

“But you can not use it upstream from the first dam or in another body of water.”

Anglers who purchase spawn for bait should look for certified VHS-disinfected spawn as this bait can be used anywhere in the state. Certified VHS-free spawn and minnows are widely available and can be used up to 14 days after purchase.

Anglers who purchase bait must retain their receipt to prove it is disease-free. Uncertified bait may only be used in waters that have tested positive for VHS, as listed in Fisheries Order 245 which can be found on the DNR’s Web site at www.michigan.gov/vhs, and uncertified bait can be used for only three days after purchase.

“There is no known treatment for VHS,” Whelan said. “Our best defense against it is trying to prevent its spread.”

Anglers and boaters can help prevent the spread of VHS, as well as

other invasive species, by taking a few simple precautions:

  • Do not move fish from one body or water to another
  • Do not empty bait buckets into the water
  • Drain live wells and bilges when leaving the water
  • Disinfect boats between uses

For more details on all aspects of VHS and fishing regulations specific to VHS, check the DNR Web site at www.michigan.gov/vhs.

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