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Tag Archive | "fish"

Report fish and wildlife observations


 

Use the Eyes in the Field app 

The Department of Natural Resources invites Michigan residents to contribute to conservation efforts by reporting their fish and wildlife observations with the new Eyes in the Field application. Available at michigan.gov/eyesinthefield, the application replaces 15 separate observation forms the DNR had been using to gather important information about the state’s fish and wildlife populations.

“Observation is a key part of managing Michigan’s diverse natural resources, and we rely on the public as additional eyes in the field to help in our monitoring efforts,” said Tom Weston, the DNR’s chief technology officer. “This new application is a one-stop shop where citizen scientists can report what they observe while spending time outdoors.”

Eyes in the Field includes forms for reporting observations of diseased wildlife, tagged fish, mammals such as cougars and feral swine, fish such as sturgeon, birds such as wild turkeys, and reptiles and amphibians such as eastern massasauga rattlesnakes. Additional observation forms will be added in the future.

The application is mobile-friendly, so it will work well on any device – smartphone, tablet or desktop computer – and is compliant with federal Americans with Disabilities Act accessibility guidelines.

To report their data, users select an observation location point on a map and submit other details, including habitat type and appearance of the animal, depending on the type of observation. Observers also can submit photos, videos and audio files through the application.

It’s important to note that Eyes in the Field does not replace the DNR’s Report All Poaching (RAP) hotline (800-292-7800). The RAP hotline – now accepting text messages, which may include photos, in addition to telephone calls – is a toll-free, 24-hour, seven-days-a-week number that enables the public to report violations of fish and game laws, as well as other natural resource-related laws. The DNR also offers a web-based RAP form, which is available via a link from Eyes in the Field.

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Fish, Ice, and Lake Oxygen


By Ranger Steve Mueller

 

 

It’s been a cold week. Snow arrived and icy roads have challenged drivers. One driver lost control at Ody Brook and slammed into a large spruce tree. It knocked the tree to a 60-degree angle. This Thanksgiving the driver can be thankful he was not injured. The tree probably will not survive. Meanwhile ice has formed on the ponds and protects the water world of nature niche life underneath.

Have you wondered why lakes don’t freeze from the bottom up? If they did, fish would be killed because lakes would freeze solid. Instead they freeze at the top and form an insolating layer that provides safe haven of aquatic wildlife for the winter.

Beavers construct a lodge they enter and exit from under the ice. Branches stored on the lake bottom are brought indoors for bark dinners. The top of beaver lodges rise above the ice allowing air exchange for breathing. A cozy lodge is insolated from extreme winter temperatures.

When fall arrives, air temperature cools and heats more rapidly than water. When cold air-cools surface water, the water sinks at 39-degrees F. At that temperature, water becomes its most compact and heaviest. It also holds the most oxygen possible at 39-degrees F. Because it is most dense, it sinks carrying oxygen to the depths of the lake.

During summer when sun warms water, a layer called a thermocline forms separating the upper and lower lake. The layer prevents easy movement between the lower (hypolimnion) and upper (epilimnion) lake water. Most plant life is above the thermocline, where sunlight reaches allowing photosynthesis to add oxygen to water during the day. At night, plants need oxygen and consume it for their needs. If algae and other plants are too abundant, they consume the oxygen and suffocate fish. This is known as summer kill.

Below the hypolimnion oxygen is slowly depleted because it is not replenished by photosynthesis or water mixing. Plants are few in the dark water, so they do not consume all the oxygen. Fish will often hang out at the thermocline, where they can cool down and slow metabolism so they require less oxygen and require less food.

In fall, the cold dense water holding oxygen sinks to the bottom of the lake oxygenating the entire lake. The movement stirs bottom sediments. I have seen Chrishaven Lake at the Christensen Nature Center look like someone stirred the lake with a giant stick in fall. The lake becomes filled with nutrient rich sediments. The activity destroys the thermocline and the lake becomes one even temperature body until the following summer when a new thermocline forms.

As water-cools below 39-degrees F, it begins to expand and does not sink. At 32-degrees F, the cold water freezes at the surface forming an insolating blanket. If windy, the blanket will not form smoothly. One can see if air was active or still by how smooth the ice layer is at the surface. Sun can penetrate ice allowing algae photosynthesis to continue. This plant growth will add oxygen to the water during the winter.

Sometimes when the snow layer on lakes is thin, light enters allowing algae to become abundant. When too abundant, the algae might consume all the oxygen during the long winter nights causing what anglers know as winter kill. At ice out in spring, dead fish float at the surface from winter suffocation. If the lake has streams flowing in, oxygen might be replenished. Fish will be found at these oxygen rich areas of the lake. A heavy snow blanket can prevent too much winter sun from entering the lake.

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at the odybrook@chartermi.net Ody Brook, 13010 Northland Dr, Cedar Springs, MI 49319-8433.

 

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Eating fish may help protect the brain


Studies show there may be a link between brain health, cardiovascular health and eating foods, such as brisling sardines, that are rich in omega-3 fatty acids.

(NAPS)—A new and large-scale study says that enjoying a diet that includes fish and other foods that are rich in omega-3 fatty acids can be a bright idea. That’s because re-search indicates these fatty acids can help to protect the brain against the effects of aging.

Dr. Zaldy Tan, a re-searcher at UCLA and the lead author of a study on the effects of omega-3s on cognitive functions, said that even after controlling for participants’ age, gender, education, body mass index and smoking, “The relationship was still there.”

Tan and others believe fish oil provides the greatest concentration of dietary omega-3 fatty acids. The types of fish that provide the highest concentration of the fatty acids are mackerel, lake trout, herring and sardines, such as the type sold under the King Oscar brand.

Dr. Brian Appleby of the Cleveland Clinic thinks the findings provide an important link be-tween brain health and cardiovascular health.

To learn more, visit www.kingoscar.com.

 

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DNR certifies new state record pumpkinseed fish


OUT-Pumpkinseed-fishThe Department of Natural Resources has certified a 2.15-pound pumpkinseed caught Oct. 26 from Lake Nepessing as a state record.

Deaunti Kemp of Flint was fishing with a leaf worm on the Lapeer County lake when he caught the 12-1/2 inch sunfish. Kemp’s pumpkinseed eclipsed the record of 1.58 pounds, set in June this year from Pickerel Lake in Emmet County.

The pumpkinseed marks the fifth time a state record fish has been caught in 2009. New state benchmarks have also been set for Great Lakes muskellunge, brown trout and redear sunfish.

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