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Tag Archive | "drunk driving"

Whatever your party, choose a designated driver 


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Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign supports driving safety  

Law enforcement officers from police departments, sheriff’s offices and the Michigan State Police are hoping the designated driver gets your vote this election season, as stepped up drunk driving patrols continue through Sept. 5 across the state. The patrols are part of the annual Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign.

“When it comes to traffic safety there is no debate, the designated driver always wins, yet Michigan alcohol-and/or drug-involved fatalities were up 20 percent in 2015,” said Michael L. Prince, Michigan Office of Highway Safety Planning (OHSP) director. “Hundreds of families are suffering tragic consequences because drivers made the wrong choice to drive drunk. The law enforcement officers participating in this campaign are dedicated to changing that.”

Fifteen people died in 12 traffic crashes during the 2015 Labor Day holiday period, a significant increase from six fatalities during the 2014 Labor Day holiday. Nearly two-thirds of the 2015 Labor Day holiday cashes involved alcohol. During last year’s Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over enforcement, officers arrested 351 drunk drivers and issued 2,630 seat belt and child restraint citations.

This year’s Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign will also include stepped up seat belt enforcement. A recent observation study indicates Michigan’s seat belt use rate is increasing this year after remaining fairly constant for the last five years.

In Michigan, it is illegal to drive with a BAC of .08 or higher, although motorists can be arrested at any BAC level if an officer believes they are impaired. Motorists face enhanced penalties if arrested for a first-time drunk driving offense with a .17 BAC or higher. Michigan law requires drivers, front seat passengers and passengers 15 and younger in any seating position to be buckled up. Children must be in a car seat or booster seat until they are 8 years old or 4’9” tall, and children under 4 years old must be in the back seat.

The Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign is supported with federal traffic safety funds coordinated by the OHSP. Grant-funded impaired driving and seat belt enforcement is part of Michigan’s Strategic Highway Safety Plan signed by Gov. Rick Snyder in 2013.

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Drunk driving enforcement a summer-long focus


With Comerica Park as the backdrop, traffic safety and law enforcement officials reminded drivers this week that you won’t need to hit a home run to be an all-star, all you need is a designated driver.

It’s a message they hope will resonate with motorists as the Fourth of July holiday approaches. Traffic deaths, especially alcohol-involved traffic deaths, increase during the summer months. That’s why all summer long, law enforcement officers from police departments, sheriff’s offices and the Michigan State Police will step up drunk driving enforcement across the state as part of the Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign.

“A designated hitter might bring you home, but a sober designated driver can get you home safely after drinking,” said Michael L. Prince, director of the Michigan Office of Highway Safety Planning. “Law enforcement officers across the state will be on the lookout for drunk drivers this summer to help ensure everyone has the opportunity to enjoy the festivities safely.”

In 2015, Michigan alcohol-involved traffic deaths were up 28 percent from 2014, from 107 to 138. Drug involved fatal crashes were up 19 percent, from 150 to 179 in 2015.

Officers, deputies and troopers who work the federally funded drunk driving patrols are all specially trained in Standard Field Sobriety Testing (SFST). SFST-trained officers complete 24 hours of lecture and hands-on instruction in comprehensive impaired driver detection.

During last year’s Fourth of July holiday, 292 motorists were arrested for drunk driving. There were 12 traffic deaths over that holiday period; more than 60 percent of those deaths involved alcohol.

In Michigan, it is illegal to drive with a blood alcohol content (BAC) of .08 or higher. Under the state’s high BAC law, motorists face enhanced penalties if a first-time arrest is for a .17 BAC or higher.

This project is part of Michigan’s Strategic Highway Safety Plan signed by Gov. Rick Snyder in 2013.

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More than 300 arrested for drunk driving 


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Officers from police departments, sheriff’s offices and Michigan State Police posts across the state arrested 351 drunk drivers and issued 2,630 seat belt and child restraint citations during the Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over crackdown. The stepped up drunk driving and seat belt enforcement began Aug. 21 and ran through the Labor Day holiday weekend.

“To enhance safety and reduce traffic fatalities, Michigan law enforcement officers have zero tolerance for motorists who fail to wear a seat belt, and they are experts at finding drivers impaired by drugs or alcohol,” said Michael L. Prince, Office of Highway Safety Planning (OHSP) director. “Motorists were warned to drive sober or get pulled over, and more than 300 drivers failed to heed that advice.”

Preliminary reports also indicate officers made 152 drug arrests and 41 felony arrests during the nearly three-week effort. Of the 351 arrests for drunk driving, 57 persons had a blood alcohol content (BAC) of .17 percent or higher.

Law enforcement officers in Branch County stopped a vehicle for motorist seat belt violation and found the passengers had open intoxicants as well as outstanding arrest warrants.  A driver stopped for not wearing a seat belt in Wayne County had a BAC of .21. A motorcyclist arrested for operating while intoxicated in Clinton County had 11 prior drunk driving arrests.

According to preliminary reports, there were 13 traffic fatalities during the 2015 Labor Day holiday period. Three of those deaths involved alcohol and five vehicle occupants were not buckled up. During the 2014 Labor Day holiday period, five of the six fatal traffic crashes involved alcohol.

In Michigan, it is illegal to drive with a BAC of .08 or higher, although motorists can be arrested at any BAC level if an officer believes they are impaired.  Motorists face enhanced penalties if arrested for a first-time drunk driving offense with a .17 BAC or higher.

Michigan law requires drivers, front seat passengers and passengers 15 and younger in any seating position to be buckled up. Children must be in a car seat or booster seat until they are 8 years old or 4’9” tall, and children under 4 years old must be in the back seat.

The Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign was supported with federal traffic safety funds coordinated by OHSP.  Grant-funded impaired driving and seat belt enforcement are part of Michigan’s Strategic Highway Safety Plan signed by Gov. Rick Snyder in 2013.

 

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Nearly 15,000 vehicles stopped during end-of-summer crackdown


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Officers from 150 local police departments, sheriff’s offices and the Michigan State Police posts stopped 14,876 vehicles, arrested 169 drunk drivers and issued 4,507 seat belt and child restraint citations during the Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over crackdown. The stepped up drunk driving and seat belt enforcement began Aug. 15 and ran through the Labor Day holiday weekend.

“Dedicated officers from police agencies across the state are committed to helping motorists get home safely by taking a zero tolerance approach to drunk driving,” said Michael L. Prince, director of the Michigan Office of Highway Safety Planning (OHSP). “Motorists were warned to drive sober or get pulled over, and more than 150 drivers failed to heed that advice.”

A driver was arrested in Genesee County for a 0.34 percent blood alcohol content (BAC). That driver also had a restricted license and an arrest warrant from two previous drunk driving incidents. In Muskegon County, a driver and passenger were stopped for smoking marijuana with a 7-month-old child in the vehicle. One traffic stop in Wexford County resulted in three fugitive arrests.

During the three-week effort, officers also issued 1,192 citations for speeding, 550 citations for driving with a suspended license and 877 citations to uninsured motorists. Officers arrested 243 fugitives and made 277 other misdemeanor arrests. Of the 169 arrests for drunk driving, 37 had a BAC of 0.17 percent or higher.

According to preliminary reports, there were three traffic fatalities during the 2014 Labor Day holiday period; one involved alcohol. Ten people died in crashes during the 2013 Labor Day holiday weekend. Three of those deaths involved alcohol and one vehicle occupant was not buckled up.

OHSP coordinated the Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over enforcement by administering federal traffic safety funds to police departments covering 40 counties.

Grant-funded seat belt and drunk driving enforcement is part of Michigan’s Strategic Highway Safety Plan signed by Gov. Rick Snyder in February 2013.

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Drive sober or get pulled over


Drunk driving crackdown kicked off in West Michigan March 12

Law enforcement agencies in 26 counties are hitting the streets to combat drunk driving during the trifecta of March Madness, spring break and St. Patrick’s Day.

Officers in Allegan, Berrien, Calhoun, Kalamazoo, Kent, Muskegon, Ottawa and Van Buren counties are conducting extra patrols to arrest drunk drivers March 12-April 7. This time period includes the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) men’s and women’s basketball tournaments, high school and college spring break periods and St. Patrick’s Day. A five-year review of crash data indicates both alcohol use and lack of seat belts play a significant role in fatal and serious injury crashes in March and early April.

The Michigan Office of Highway Safety Planning (OHSP) is coordinating the effort ,which is supported by federal traffic safety funds.

“If you’re out celebrating a big win or having a green beer with friends, be sure to designate a sober driver,” said Michael L. Prince, OHSP director. “Extra officers will be out on patrol, and if you’re caught driving drunk you will be arrested.”

In 2013, 2,271 people were arrested for drunk driving during the NCAA tournament time period. Of those, 671 were arrested under the state’s high blood-alcohol content (BAC) law with BACs of .17 or higher. More than 500 of those arrests were made by grant-funded law enforcement agencies during last year’s drunk driving crackdown.

In Michigan, it is illegal to drive with a BAC of .08 or higher, although motorists can be arrested at any BAC level if an officer believes they are impaired. Motorists face enhanced penalties if arrested for a first-time drunk driving offense with a .17 BAC or higher.

 

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Impaired driving deaths and injuries rise


N-Drunk-driving-auditThe Michigan Office of Highway Safety Planning released statistics this week showing an increase in alcohol- and drug-related crashes, fatalities and injuries in the last year. However, a five-year picture shows an overall decline, with alcohol involvement decreasing more rapidly than drug involvement.

The 2012 Michigan Drunk Driving audit showed that traffic deaths resulting from alcohol- and/or drug-related crashes jumped 7.2 percent, from 319 in 2011 to 342 in 2012, while injuries increased from 6,086 to 6,177.  Drug involvement in traffic fatalities increased 6.3 percent, from 127 deaths in 2011 to 135 in 2012, while alcohol involvement climbed 2.6 percent, from 274 to 281. Seventy-four deaths involved both alcohol and drugs and were counted in each category.

The increases come after dramatic drops in all categories in 2011. It should be noted deaths involving alcohol and/or drugs have fallen by 9.8 percent over the past five years. Alcohol-involved traffic deaths have decreased by 11.4 percent since 2008, while drug-involved deaths have declined by 3.6 percent.

“Although 2012 saw increases in impaired driving deaths and injuries, the overall trend in Michigan is a positive one,” said Col. Kriste Kibbey Etue, director of the Michigan State Police (MSP).  “Officers in Michigan have been and will continue to make impaired driving enforcement a priority.”

The Drunk Driving Audit is an annual report issued by the MSP Criminal Justice Information Center and is a collaborative effort between MSP and the Michigan Department of State.

“While the overall decline in injuries and deaths over the last five years is encouraging, the 2012 report shows we must be vigilant and continue to educate drivers about the dangers of driving while under the influence of alcohol and drugs,” said Secretary of State Ruth Johnson. “Law enforcement does an exceptional job and our driver education partners are doing everything they can to educate drivers but it’s going to take all of us working together to save lives and make our roads safe.”

In 2012, officers made 37,182 alcohol and drug-related driving arrests. Male drivers were nearly three times as likely as female drivers to be arrested for impaired driving, with 27,606 men arrested compared to 9,576 women. There were 36,322 persons convicted of operating under the influence of liquor or other impaired driving offenses. Some of these convictions include arrests made in prior years.

The 2012 Drunk Driving Audit includes county-specific information and is available at Michigan.gov/drunkdrivingaudit.

 

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Statewide spring drunk driving crackdown results in 400 arrests


More than 400 motorists were arrested for drunk driving during a three-week impaired driving crackdown this spring. Of those arrested, 79 were charged under the state’s high blood alcohol content (BAC) law with having a BAC of .17 or higher.

Law enforcement officers from more than 165 agencies conducted stepped up enforcement aimed at curtailing drunk driving during the Drunk Driving. Over the Limit. Under Arrest. crackdown March 13-April 2. This resulted in 8,083 traffic stops and nearly 4,000 citations or arrests, including 281 for other alcohol- and drug-related charges such as open intoxicants.

“Michigan law enforcement agencies take drunk driving very seriously,” said Michael L. Prince, Office of Highway Safety Planning (OHSP) director. “The increased enforcement also provided opportunities to identify other traffic safety violations and resolve unsolved cases.”

In addition to the 405 drunk driving arrests, 214 misdemeanor and felony arrests were made. Officers also issued 148 seat belt and child restraint, 722 speeding and 425 uninsured motorist citations. Five stolen vehicles were recovered, 326 drivers were found to be driving on suspended licenses and 161 fugitives were arrested during the enforcement effort. OHSP coordinated the effort, which was funded with federal highway safety grants, in 26 counties.

In Kalamazoo County, Richland Township officers stopped a suspected drunk driver. That stop resulted in several arrests including possession of drugs, open intoxicants, minor in possession charges and a confession for a recent home invasion.

In the past, OHSP funded March drunk driving efforts focused only on St. Patrick’s Day. A five-year review of crash data indicated alcohol use and failure to buckle up played a significant role in fatal and serious injury crashes during the month and into early April. March included St. Patrick’s Day, many school spring break periods and college basketball tournament games.

Grant-funded counties included: Allegan, Bay, Berrien, Calhoun, Chippewa, Delta, Genesee, Grand Traverse, Houghton, Ingham, Jackson, Kalamazoo, Kent, Livingston, Macomb, Marquette, Monroe, Muskegon, Oakland, Ottawa, Saginaw, St. Clair, Van Buren, Washtenaw, Wayne and Wexford.

 

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Spring drunk driving crackdown


Motorists heading out to cheer on their favorite college hoops team at the local sports bar or to toast the luck of the Irish at the corner pub are reminded to design-te a sober driver before the celebration starts.

Law enforcement officers from 160 agencies are conducting extra patrols to look for and arrest drunk drivers March 13-April 2. This time period includes the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) men’s and women’s basketball tournaments as well as St. Patrick’s Day.

Agencies in 26 counties, including Allegan, Berrien, Calhoun, Kalamazoo, Kent, Muskegon, Ottawa and Van Buren, will be conducting drunk driving enforcement paid for through federal traffic safety funds administered by the Office of Highway Safety Planning (OHSP).

“If you’re out celebrating a big win or having a green beer with friends, be sure to designate a sober driver,” said Michael L. Prince, OHSP director. “Drunk driving is not tolerated in Michigan. Anyone caught driving drunk will be arrested. No excuses. No second chances.”

In the past, March drunk driving enforcement efforts were focused only on St. Patrick’s Day. A five-year review of crash data indicates both alcohol use and lack of seat belts play a significant role in fatal and serious injury crashes during the month and into early April.

In 2011, 2,215 people were arrested for drunk driving during the NCAA tournament time period; 613 were arrested under the state’s high blood-alcohol content (BAC) law with BAC’s of .17 or higher.

In Michigan, it is illegal to drive with a BAC of .08 or higher, although motorists can be arrested at any BAC level if an officer believes they are impaired. Motorists face enhanced penalties if arrested for a first-time drunk driving offense with a .17 BAC or higher.

 

 

 

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Holiday enforcement results in more than 300 drunk driving arrests


More than 300 motorists are starting 2012 with a budget-busting bill after being arrested during a statewide drunk driving crackdown over the holidays. Of those arrested, 38 were charged under the state’s high blood alcohol content (BAC) law with having a BAC of .17 or higher.
On average, a drunk driving arrest in Michigan costs about $15,000, including court costs, legal fees, bail, towing, license fees and increased insurance rates.
Law enforcement officers from more than 165 agencies conducted stepped up enforcement aimed at curtailing drunk driving during the Drunk Driving. Over the Limit. Under Arrest. crackdown Dec. 16-Jan. 2. This resulted in 7,334 traffic stops and more than 3,800 citations or arrests, including 108 for other alcohol- and drug-related charges such as open intoxicants.
The Office of Highway Safety Planning (OHSP) coordinated the effort which was funded with federal highway safety grants in 26 counties. In addition to the 308 drunk driving arrests, 175 other misdemeanor and felony arrests were made. Officers also issued 91 seat belt and child restraint, 649 speeding and 360 uninsured motorist citations. Three stolen vehicles were recovered, 317 drivers were found to be driving on suspended licenses and 171 fugitives were arrested during the enforcement effort. During a similar effort last year that included 35 grant-funded counties, officers made 9,462 traffic stops and arrested 356 drunk drivers.
“Drunk driving is not tolerated in Michigan,” said Michael L. Prince, OHSP director. “Those motorists who made the poor decision to drive while impaired will be paying the price in 2012 and beyond.”
Preliminary reports from the Michigan State Police Criminal Justice Information Center indicate 15 people died in traffic crashes during the recent Christmas and New Year’s holidays, with four of those deaths involving alcohol. Three of those killed were pedestrians and one was a snowmobiler. This is an increase over the 2011 holiday periods when 11 people died in traffic crashes. Four of those deaths were also alcohol-related.
Grant-funded counties included: Allegan, Bay, Berrien, Calhoun, Chippewa, Delta, Genesee, Grand Traverse, Houghton, Ingham, Jackson, Kalamazoo, Kent, Livingston, Macomb, Marquette, Monroe, Muskegon, Oakland, Ottawa, Saginaw, St. Clair, Van Buren, Washtenaw, Wayne and Wexford counties.

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End-of-summer crackdown nets over 200 drunk drivers


The seasons may be changing, but some Michigan motorists are still dealing with the consequences of their summer drunk driving arrest during the Drunk Driving. Over the Limit. Under Arrest. Statewide enforcement crackdown.
Between Aug. 19 and Sept. 5, officers conducted more than 11,300 traffic stops resulting in 230 arrests for drunk driving. This includes 34 drivers arrested for a blood alcohol content (BAC) of .17 or higher under Michigan’s High BAC Law.
“Over the Limit. Under Arrest. is designed to keep our roads safer by deterring people from driving drunk,” said Michael L. Prince, Office of Highway Safety Planning (OHSP) director. “We use a high visibility advertising campaign and increased police presence to get the word out, because the consequences of a drunk driving arrest last long after the summer travel season.”
This year’s crackdown also included seat belt enforcement zones and patrols during which officers issued 2,530 seat belt and child restraint citations.
In addition, officers made 74 drug-related arrests and issued 835 speeding citations, as well as 2,225 citations for other traffic violations.
The crackdown was coordinated by OHSP and paid for with federal traffic safety dollars. More than 200 state, county and local law enforcement agencies in 35 counties participated in the extra patrols.
Preliminary results from the Michigan State Police, Criminal Justice Information Center show there were 11 fatalities in 10 traffic crashes over the Labor Day holiday weekend in Michigan. Four of the crashes involved alcohol and a seat belt was not used in five of the seven fatalities in passenger vehicles. This represents an over 50 percent decrease in fatalities from the 2010 Labor Day holiday weekend when 21 people died in Michigan crashes; ten of those fatalities involved alcohol.

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