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Tag Archive | "dog"

Snowmobile Violations – Leaving the scene of a property damage accident.


OUT-Snowmobile-Conservation-officer-logoby Sgt. John Jurcich

 

The Department of Natural Resources, Law Enforcement Division, continues to seek information related to a hit and run snowmobile crash which killed one dog and seriously injured a second dog along Simonelli Road in Fruitland Township of Muskegon County on the evening of February 16th 2014.

At approximately 7:30 p.m. two Fruitland Township residents were at the end of a driveway while snow was being cleared and mail was being retrieved from a mailbox along this lightly traveled rural road. Two vehicles were visible at the end of the driveway with tractor lights illuminating the road at the time of the incident.  Two Brittany Spaniels, owned by one of the residents, briefly ran into the gravel roadway and were returning to the drive when a lone snowmobile approaching from the north, traveling the center of the roadway at a high rate of speed appeared. The snowmobile continued at high speed striking both dogs within twenty feet of the owner and witness. The suspect vehicle did not slow or brake prior to or after the collision.  One dog died on scene after being thrown 114 feet, and the second dog required emergency care and surgery in Grand Rapids with veterinary bills totaling more than $6,000.

The snowmobile was last observed at the intersection of Simonelli and Lakewood Roads. Conservation Officers and local law enforcement have been working leads related to this incident but continue to seek additional information. Investigators may be seeking a mid to late 1990s, Polaris snowmobile, dark in color, being operated by a lone occupant. This snowmobile may have left the Berry Junction Trail or the City of Whitehall just prior to the incident and may have been returning to Fruitland or the Laketon Township area at the time of the crash.

Snowmobiles in Muskegon County may operate to the extreme right of the “right of way” or plowed portion of the roadway.  Speeds may not exceed those posted or designated to normal vehicular traffic.  Under Michigan Snowmobile and Motor Vehicle Code laws, snowmobiles involved in a crash causing property damage or human injury, must stop at the scene to provide information.

Information may be provided to the DNR Report All Poaching Hotline at 1 800 292-7800 or the Muskegon Silent Observer at 72-Crime.

Posted in OutdoorsComments Off

Dog loves the Post


N-dog-caught-reading-PostIt appears that it’s not only people that love the Post—man’s best friend thinks its pretty cool, too!

Noah Bayink, 7, of Cedar Springs, sent us an email and told us that his family caught their two-year-old Chihuahua, Willy, reading the Post! We wonder what section is his favorite? Perhaps he’s looking for a friend in Critter Corner, or looking for a girlfriend in Pet of the Week. Whatever he’s reading, we hope he enjoys it. We are both a pet and family-friendly publication!

Thanks for sharing that with us, Noah!

 

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Dog thrown through windshield


N-Accident-Howard-CityA woman’s dog was thrown through a windshield when the car it was riding in crashed on US131 near Howard City Tuesday.

According to Howard City Police Chief Steven DeWitt, the crash occurred about 9:30 a.m. September 3, on northbound US131, a half mile south of Cutler Road, in Reynolds Township, Montcalm County.

A neighbor heard the crash and and went out to the Expressway to investigate. There he found a 2005 Jeep Liberty concealed in a heavy brush and wooded area not visible from the roadway.

Police said a 25 year-old pregnant woman from Grawn, Mich., was traveling north on US131 when she left the expressway for an unknown reason, traveled approximately 300 feet and struck a large walnut tree head on.

The victim was conscious and alert when police arrived on the scene and was transported by ambulance to a hospital. The extent of her injuries is unknown.

Police said it appears a dog in the vehicle traveled thru the windshield after it struck the tree. The dog could not be located in the heavy brush/swamp area of the crash. Residents are asked if they find an approximately 130 pound Rottweiler dog in the area to call animal control.

Montcalm County EMS Alpha 3 and Rescue 29 responded to the scene.

 

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Dog saves woman’s life


Julie Haff and Nickie, her little Dachsund.

Julie Haff and Nickie, her little Dachsund.

By Judy Reed

 

Man’s best friend can also be a woman’s best friend. Just ask Julie Haff.

Haff, 43, explained that she has a brain aneurysm, and anytime she hits that area of her head, she goes into a seizure, a kind of daze. Last month she was sitting on her front porch on N. Second Street in Cedar Springs when she got a phone call with some bad news.

“I wasn’t expecting it, and I sat back in the chair and hit my head on the corner of the house,” she explained.

Haff said she slumped sideways into a daze. Nickie, her little Dachsund, kept bumping and licking her, but Haff couldn’t move or feel anything. “The neighbors saw Nickie doing that and me not responding, so they came over and put me on the deck and called 911,” said Haff.

She said she was out for about 45 minutes with a mini stroke, and finally came to in the ambulance.

Haff said she’s had Nickie about two years, and she’s not surprised that Nickie would try to wake her up. “She’s a really caring and compassionate dog,” remarked Haff. “When we had kittens she even tried to nurse them.”

Haff said she’s grateful to Nickie, as well as her neighbors and family, who all helped to wake her up.

 

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A Dog’s Life


By Ronnie McBrayer

Our three boys were playing football in the backyard this winter when one of them called to me with words I could have never anticipated. Casually, as if he were making a weather observation, he said, “Dad…the dog is on the roof.” I exploded onto the upper deck to discover that my son was alarmingly correct.

Toby, our new little Shih Tzu, had inexplicably crawled beneath the deck railing and was 15 feet across a pitched metal roof, two stories off the ground. I was horrified. My dear wife was worse, deranged with panic. I understood that if this disaster were not averted, I did not have enough pastoral skill, fatherly wisdom, Valium, or hard liquor to assuage the suffering.

So, with the boys in place below, ready to exercise their burgeoning football catching skills, my hand firmly holding my wife by the belt loops at the railing, and aiming every prayer at heaven I could muster, I gently called, “Toby…come here, boy.” He loped over to me as if it was a day at the dog park, and tragedy was dodged.

As crazy as this story is, here is the craziest thing of all: while our entire family mobilized to protect and save this precious little dog, Toby was completely, totally, and blissfully unaware of our efforts. Hands were shaking. Tears were forming. Railings were being scaled. Catch nets were being weaved. Meanwhile, he was sniffing leaves, enjoying the view, and inspecting the strange metal floor beneath his feet.

Toby doesn’t understand this, but he doesn’t have to; he simply lives a dog’s life in the loving arms of those who always look out for him. Sometimes I perceive God working the same way. I sense him hanging in the atmosphere around us; ethereal, intangible, but very real. Occasionally, I glimpse him lurking within and brooding over the circumstances of life, sometimes gently calling, but most of the time just ready to catch us when we fall; or to save us from ourselves when we’ve crawled too far out on the ledge. Even while our well-being is in jeopardy, we are enfolded by a protecting love.

Yes, I believe there is a mysterious, unseen, hovering God in the universe that we cannot always understand, see, or otherwise tangibly perceive. But we know he is there. His enveloping love for us is very real, and yes, it is very good.

Ronnie McBrayer is a syndicated columnist, speaker, and author of multiple books. You can read more and receive regular e-columns in your inbox at www.ronniemcbrayer.net.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Keeping the FaithComments Off


Roger on Main StreetNews department
All the news is bad. Going straight to the jokes:

Dog department
A guy is driving around the back roads of Montana and sees a sign in front of a broken-down house: “Talking Dog For Sale.” He rings the bell. The owner appears and tells him the dog is in the backyard.
The guy walks into the backyard and sees a nice looking Labrador retriever. “You talk?” he asks.
“Yep,” replies the Lab.
It takes the guy a minute or two to recover from the shock of hearing a dog talk.
“Well,” answers the Lab, “I was pretty young when I discovered I could talk. I notified the CIA about it and they quickly offered me a job. They had me jetting from country to country, sitting in rooms with spies and world leaders because no one figured a dog would be eavesdropping.
“For eight years I was one of their most valuable agents. But the jetting around tired me out, and I knew I wasn’t getting any younger. It was time for a change. The airport hired me to do some undercover security, wandering near suspicious characters and listening in. I uncovered some incredible dealings and was awarded a batch of medals.
“Then I got married, had a mess of puppies, and now I’m just retired.”
The guy is amazed. He goes back in and asks the owner what he wants for the dog.
“Ten bucks,” says the owner.
“Ten bucks? This dog is amazing! Why on earth are you selling him so cheap?”
“Because he’s a liar,” says the owner. “He’s never been out of the backyard.”

Advice department
A man goes to see his rabbi. “Rabbi, something terrible is happening and I have to talk with you about it.”
“What’s wrong?” says the rabbi.
“My wife is poisoning me,” answers the man.
Surprised, the rabbi asks, “How do you know?”
“I’m telling you she’s poisoning me!” says the man, obviously distressed. “I’m absolutely certain about it. What should I do?”
“Tell you what,” offers the rabbi. “Let me talk to her. I’ll see what I can find out and let you know.”
A week later, the Rabbi calls the man. “I spoke with your wife,” he says. “I spoke with her on the phone for three hours. You wanted to know what you should do, is that right?”
“Yes!” says the man. The rabbi looks him straight in the eye and says, “Take the poison.”

Dog department, continued
Entering a small country store, a stranger noticed a sign that said, “Danger, beware of the dog” posted on the door. Inside, he noticed a harmless old hound dog asleep on the floor beside the cash register.
“Is this the dog folks are supposed to beware of?” he asked the proprietor.
“Yep, that’s him,” came the reply.
The stranger couldn’t help but smile. “That certainly doesn’t look like a dangerous dog to me. Why the sign?”
“Because,” the owner explained, “Before I put up that sign, people kept tripping over him.”

Posted in Roger on Main St.Comments Off


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