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Tag Archive | "diabetes"

Stepping out for spring?


HEA-Stepping-out-for-spring

People with diabetes should check their feet first

(BPT) – Spring is finally here and it’s an ideal time to get outside and be more physically active. For those with diabetes, regular exercise helps increase circulation and is a critical part of staying healthy. But, before lacing up your sneakers, remember these important steps to ensure your feet are in shape:

* Get the green light from your health care provider. Discuss the type of physical activity that’s best for you and ask your provider to examine your feet. In general, your feet should be professionally examined four times each year.

* Be mindful of everyday foot care. Sometimes, people with diabetes have serious foot problems yet feel no pain. This may be due to nerve damage, a long-term complication of diabetes. Everyday self care includes inspecting your feet for scratches, cracks, cuts or blisters and washing and drying them carefully, especially between the toes.

* Wear socks and well-fitting shoes. Because of the higher risk of foot problems among those with diabetes, avoid going barefoot, even indoors. Wear socks and shoes that fit properly.

* If you do notice a problem, it may be a foot ulcer. Ulcers occur most often on the ball of the foot or on the bottom of the big toe. Ulcers may also appear on the sides of the foot. Keep in mind, while some ulcers may not hurt, every ulcer should be seen by your health care provider right away.

* Get foot ulcers treated. If you have a foot ulcer, innovative treatments can help, such as EpiFix, a wound care product from MiMedx, used extensively to rapidly and effectively heal diabetic foot ulcers. EpiFix is a dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft that delivers essential wound healing growth factors, enhances healing and reduces inflammation and scar tissue formation.

* Let it heal. If you have an ulcer, help it to heal by staying off your feet. Walking on an ulcer may worsen the problem by making the wound larger or migrating it deeper into your foot.

“Foot problems, including ulcers, are common among people with diabetes, but they don’t have to hold you back if you take the proper precautions and seek early treatment,” says Dr. Matt Garoufalis, president at Physicians Surgery Care Center, Chicago, Ill., and immediate past president of the American Podiatric Medical Association. “Before you step out to enjoy the spring weather, have your feet checked by a health care provider to make sure you’re good to go.”

 

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Health alert: Are you at risk for type 2 diabetes and don’t know it?


HEA-Diabetes

(BPT) – Diabetes is a serious disease that strikes nearly 26 million children and adults in the U.S., and 7 million do not even know they have it. An additional 79 million, or one in three American adults, have prediabetes, which puts them at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes.

For 26 years, the American Diabetes Association has set aside one special day for people to learn their risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Held on the fourth Tuesday of every March, American Diabetes Association Alert Day (R) is a one-day “wake-up call” asking the American public to take the Diabetes Risk Test. This year’s Alert Day will be March 25. The Association will also be encouraging the public to start living a healthy and active lifestyle by asking them to join a Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes (R)event in their area.-

The Diabetes Risk-Test-asks users to answer simple questions about weight, age, family history, and other potential risk factors for-prediabetes-or-type 2 diabetes. Preventive tips are provided for everyone who takes the test. For every Diabetes Risk Test taken, Boar’s Head Brand(R)—a leading provider of premium delicatessen products—will donate $5 to the American Diabetes Association starting March 25 through April 25, 2014, up to $50,000.

Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include people who are overweight, are under active, over the age of 45 or who have a family history of diabetes. African Americans, Hispanic/Latinos, Native Americans, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders are also at higher risk. Understanding your risk for developing type 2 diabetes, or getting an early diagnosis, is critical to successful treatment and delaying or preventing some of its complications such as heart disease, blindness, kidney disease, stroke, amputation and death.

Carmen Micciche was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at the age of 31. By then, at 400 pounds, he’d been feeling the symptoms for about six years, yet he ignored them.

“I didn’t even know what diabetes was when I was diagnosed,” says Micciche, now 56.

Micciche, a Subway (R) restaurant franchise owner, was so focused on building a successful business he ignored his health and suffered through numerous gall bladder attacks before finally seeing a doctor. After checking his blood pressure and testing for diabetes, he was sent to the hospital.

Twenty year later, Micciche now weighs about 185 pounds and has brought his A1C (average blood glucose levels) down from a staggering 12 percent to just over 6 percent, which is close to the normal range. He finally learned, with daily exercise and healthy eating, what it takes to be healthy.

“Eat right, exercise, listen to your doctors,” he says. “You have to do everything you can to maintain a healthy weight. The consequences are too high if you don’t.”

Micciche has helped raise more than $1 million for the American Diabetes Association to help Stop Diabetes (R), placing donation boxes and selling pin-ups in each of his 30 Subway restaurants. He wants everyone to know that a type 2 diabetes diagnosis doesn’t have to end your life.

Studies have shown that type 2 diabetes can often be prevented or delayed by losing just 7 percent of body weight (such as 15 pounds if you weigh 200) through regular physical activity (30 minutes a day, five days a week) and healthy eating. By understanding your risk, you can take the necessary steps to help prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes.

Be part of the movement to Stop Diabetes and take the Diabetes Risk Test by going to diabetes.org/risktest, the Association’s Facebook page where you can share the test with friends and loved ones, or by calling 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383).

 

 

 

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Pear Perfection


 

Food Images: Tara Donne

Photo Credit: Tara Donne

Sam Talbot’s “The Sweet Life” is available on amazon.com, at Barnes and Noble, and at book stores nationwide. Photo credit: Sarah Kehoe

Sam Talbot’s “The Sweet Life” is available on amazon.com, at Barnes and Noble, and at book stores nationwide. Photo credit: Sarah Kehoe

(Family Features) For the more than 25 million Americans living with diabetes, food choices are critical to maintaining their health.

 

Chef Sam Talbot, who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when he was 12 years old, understands those challenges. But with his new cookbook he proves that diabetics don’t have to sacrifice flavor in order to follow a healthy eating plan.

 

Talbot earned national recognition as the runner-up in Season 2 of Bravo’s hit TV show “Top Chef.” In his new book, “The Sweet Life: Diabetes without Boundaries,” he shares how diabetes has affected — but has not compromised — his life and career, and offers 75 fresh, all-natural recipes that can be enjoyed by both diabetics and non-diabetics.

 

Chef Sam Talbot. Photo credit: Sarah Kehoe

Chef Sam Talbot. Photo credit: Sarah Kehoe

Cooking to Manage Diabetes

Doctors recommend that people with diabetes follow a healthy, well balanced diet that includes plenty of fiber-rich fruits and vegetables and carbohydrates that rank lower on the glycemic index (GI).

The Glycemic Index

The glycemic index (GI) rates carbohydrates on a scale of 1 to 100 based on how rapidly a food item raises blood sugar levels after eating. Foods that rank high on the glycemic index are digested rapidly, which produces marked fluctuations in blood sugar and insulin levels. Foods with a low glycemic index are digested slowly and raise blood sugar and insulin levels gradually.

Source: University of Sydney Glycemic Index Group, Human Nutrition Unit, School of Molecular Biosciences.

“Pears are one of my favorite fruits to use in recipes,” says Talbot. “They are a low GI fruit, they’re high in fiber, and the flavor of a ripe pear is just out of this world. They are incredibly versatile in sweet and savory recipes in all types of world cuisines. They can be part of any meal of the day.”

 

The two recipes here are from Talbot’s book, and showcase the fresh, sweet flavor of pears. For more information, visit www.SamTalbot.com, and for additional pear recipes visit www.usapears.org.

 

— One medium pear provides 24 percent of your day’s fiber, and 10 percent of your day’s vitamin C — for only 100 calories.

 

— There are ten different varieties of USA Pears, each with its own color, flavor and texture.

 

— More than 80 percent of the fresh pears grown in the U.S. are from the Pacific Northwest states of Washington and Oregon. USA Pears are in season from early fall through early summer.

 

Check the Neck for Ripeness 

Ripeness is the key to enjoying pears at their sweetest and juiciest. To judge a pear’s ripeness, USA Pear growers advise you to “check the neck.” Press the neck, or stem end, of the pear. If it yields to gentle pressure, it’s ripe, sweet and juicy. If it feels firm, simply leave the pear at room temperature to ripen within a few days. Don’t refrigerate your pears unless you want to slow their ripening.

 

Photo Credit: Tara Donne.

Photo Credit: Tara Donne.

Yogurt with Pear and Coconut

Makes 4 servings

Juice of 1 lemon

1/3 cup unsweetened shredded coconut

2 tablespoons graham cracker crumbs

1/2 cup Grape-Nuts or granola cereal

1 tablespoon granulated stevia extract, or to taste

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

2 ripe pears, such as Anjou or Bosc, slightly firm to the touch

3 cups 2% plain Greek yogurt

 

In medium bowl, combine lemon juice, coconut, graham cracker crumbs, cereal, sweetener and cinnamon.

 

Peel, core and finely chop pears.

 

Spoon yogurt into 4 bowls and top with fruit and coconut mixture, or sprinkle directly onto each individual container of yogurt.

 

Note: This recipe can do double duty as a dessert if you serve it up parfait style. Spoon 1/8 of the pears into the bottom of each of 4 bowls or parfait glasses. Add 1/8 of the cereal mixture, then 1/2 cup of yogurt. Repeat with the remaining pears, cereal mixture, and yogurt.

 

Per Serving: 265 calories, 15 g protein, 38 g carbohydrates, 8 g total fat (6 g saturated), 8 mg cholesterol, 6 g fiber, 157 mg sodium

 

Lavender Poached Pears

Makes 4 servings

2 large ripe pears, such as Bosc or Anjou, slightly firm to the touch

3 tablespoons granulated stevia extract, or to taste

1 tablespoon dried lavender

2 blossoms dried hibiscus

1 chamomile tea bag

1/2 cup loosely packed fresh mint leaves

 

Peel, halve and core pears using a melon baller to scoop out seeds.

 

In large pot, combine 3 cups water, sweetener, lavender, hibiscus, chamomile tea and mint. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, then reduce heat to medium-low. Add pears and simmer until you can easily pierce pears with the tip of a knife, about 20 minutes.

 

To serve, transfer pear halves to 4 individual bowls and ladle some of the cooking liquid over the top.

 

Per Serving: 72 calories, 1 g protein, 19 g carbohydrates, 0 g total fat (0 g saturated), 0 mg cholesterol, 4 g fiber, 2 mg sodium

 

Recipes excerpted from the book, “The Sweet Life: Diabetes without Boundaries,” by Sam Talbot. Published by Rodale. Copyright © 2011.

 

Captions:

Book Cover Image: Sam Talbot’s “The Sweet Life” is available on amazon.com, at Barnes and Noble, and at book stores nationwide. Photo credit: Sarah Kehoe

 

Chef Sam Talbot. Photo credit: Sarah Kehoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

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It’s Complicated: Diabetes and your dental health


People with diabetes should make sure their dentist is aware of the condition. That way, they can work together to create a personal oral care plan.

People with diabetes should make sure their dentist is aware of the condition. That way, they can work together to create a personal oral care plan.

(NAPS) – A recent study  in the Journal of the American Dental Association found that one out of five cases of total tooth loss in the United States is linked to diabetes. While complications are part of managing diabetes, for the nearly 26 million people in the U.S. living with the condition, tooth loss and other dental health problems are unlikely to be on their radar.

When it comes to diabetes and dental health, research suggests that the connection actually goes both ways. On the one hand, because of lowered resistance to infection and a longer healing process, gum disease appears to be more frequent and more severe among those with diabetes. On the other hand, it appears that treating gum disease in people with diabetes can actually help people improve control over their blood sugar levels.

“A dentist can be a valuable member of a diabetes health care team, along with a primary care provider and other health professionals,” said Alice G. Boghosian, DDS, and an American Dental Association (ADA) consumer advisor.

The American Diabetes Association estimates that 79 million people, or one in four, may have prediabetes, or blood glucose levels that are above average but not quite high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Additionally, of the nearly 26 million Americans with diabetes, about 7 million are still undiagnosed. With those figures in mind, regular health care checkups should be a priority, including dental visits that may help to identify potential signs of diabetes that appear in the mouth.

“In my practice, I’ve seen severly inflamed gums and cases of gum disease that have, together with a patient’s medical history, prompted a discussion about whether there is a potential risk of diabetes,” said Dr. Boghosian. “Oral health and overall health are connected, and as a dentist, it’s my job to flag signs of poor oral health that might also signal other serious health conditions.”

People with diabetes should make sure their dentist is aware of the condition, and together, create a personal oral care plan. Also, be sure to ask your dentist how you can check for signs of gum disease at home in between dental checkups.

Regardless of whether you have diabetes, practicing good oral care is essential to a healthy lifestyle. The ADA urges you to make mouth-healthy habits a priority.

Be sure to:

• Brush for two minutes twice a day with fluoride toothpaste

• Floss daily

• Eat a healthy diet

• Visit your dentist regularly.

For more information on diabetes and oral health, please visit www.mouthhealthy.org

 

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Nine-year-old to walk to stop diabetes


Fundraising garage sale this weekend to benefit walk 

 

Preston Ostrom

Preston Ostrom

Most nine-year-olds are active and energetic. So earlier this year, when Preston Ostrom, son of Kurt and Abby Ostrom, of Kent City, started drinking a lot of water, and wanting to sleep all the time, his mom started asking him questions about his strange behavior. He just wasn’t himself.

When she checked with the school, the school said he wasn’t participating anymore, wasn’t his normal self, and his face was red most of the time. Then they called and told his mom that Preston fell asleep in class. So Preston’s mom googled his symptoms, and found that he could have diabetes.

She called and made an appointment with the doctor. The doctor thought it was just something viral, but his mom insisted they test for diabetes. After five minutes of being tested, Preston was taken to the emergency room for high blood sugar.

“After 5 months of learning how to manage diabetes, the shots and sugar checks are ok, but learning a new way to eat is a real struggle for me,” said Preston. “But I’ve learned diabetes doesn’t define me. I’m still the same kid and I can be anything I want to be. Maybe even playing football for the U of M!”

According to Preston’s aunt, Lori Ostrom, Preston is walking in the American Diabetes Association’s Step Out Walk to stop diabetes event at Rosa Parks Circle in Grand Rapids on October 5. “It’s his 10th birthday, so it’s extra special to him. We are joining him and trying to raise funds.”

She will be having a fundraising garage sale this weekend, September 13 and 14, at her home at 13383 Shaner Avenue, between 16 and 17 Mile, to help raise $1,000 for the walk. All proceeds from the garage sale will be donated to Preston’s Team for the Step Out event.

 

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Diabetes and CPR classes in Greenville


United Lifestyles, a member of Spectrum Health United Hospital in Greenville, is offering a three-session Diabetes Education group class, and a CPR class in May.

Diabetes classes

The diabetes classes will be held on Wednesdays, beginning May 9, 2012 from 1 to 4 p.m. at 407 S. Nelson, Greenville. This American Diabetes Association recognized program includes education on glucose levels, dietary guidelines, and management techniques. Most insurances cover all or part of the class fees, with a physician’s signature. Registration is required. For more information, call 616.754.6185, ext. 100 or 800.406.4551.

CPR class

The CPR class will be on Thursday, May 10, 2012 from 6 to 9:30 p.m. at 407 S. Nelson, Greenville. This comprehensive community class includes CPR for Adult, Infant & Child and Automated External Defibrillation (AED) training. Cost for the class is $40. Registration is required. An on-line renewal option is available. For more information, call 616.754.6185, ext. 100 or 800.406.4551.

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Greenville Eagles to Host Diabetes Research Benefit March 10


Proceeds benefit Diabetes Research Center

Greenville, Mich. – The Greenville Fraternal Order of Eagles #4321 welcomes the community to help give back Saturday, March 10, from 11 a.m. until midnight for an all-day charity benefit at the Greenville Aerie, located at 11690 S. Greenville Rd. Proceeds from the event benefit The Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center.

The Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center will be housed at the John and Mary Pappajohn Biomedical Discovery Building on the campus of The University of Iowa in Iowa City. The state-of-the-art center will host leaders in the field of diabetes research in an effort to find a cure for the disease. The F.O.E. has pledged to donate $25 million over a five-year period to fund research efforts. To date, the Eagles have given $15 million to the university to help bring an end to diabetes.

Greenville’s DRC benefit will feature drink specials, raffles, prizes and music by Jeff C. A wing-ding chicken basket dinner with fries and cole slaw can be purchased for an $8 donation.

Guests include Eagles Grand Trustee Chuck Lang, Michigan State Worthy President-Elect Bill Vettori and Michigan State Worthy Trustee and Diabetes Research Center State Chairman Mike Votsch.

The Greenville Eagles has maintained a presence in the community since 1993 and currently hosts more than 430 Aerie and Auxiliary members.

For information contact the Greenville Aerie at 616-794-2987, Dan Sanders at 616-824-9019 or Worthy President Bob Conner at 616-204-6351.

 

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Get healthy with United Lifestyles


Dates UPDATED: 1/6/2012

United Lifestyles, a member of Spectrum Health United Hospital in Greenville, is offering two programs this month.
Walk and Talk: Trying to lose those holiday pounds? Join Renee DeFrang, Registered Dietitian, for a weekly weigh-in followed by a 10 minute motivational talk on weight loss and a 10 minute group walk. The cost for the program is $30.  The program will be held on Wednesdays starting January 18 through February 29, 2012 from 4 to 4:30 p.m. at Greenville High School, Room 534, 111 Hillcrest, Greenville. (Park in the lot off of Yellow Jacket Drive and use the back entrance.) Registration is required. For more information, call 616.754.6185, ext. 100 or 800.406.4551.
Diabetes question and answer session: United Lifestyles is offering a free question and answer session with a pharmacist on diabetes medications. The session will be on Wednesday, January 11, 2012 from 4:30 to 5 p.m. at 407 S. Nelson, Greenville. Registration is required. For more information, call 616.754.6185, ext. 100 or 800.406.4551.

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Diabetes Education


United Lifestyles, a member of Spectrum Health United Hospital in Greenville, is offering a three-session Diabetes Education group class. The classes will be held on Wednesdays, beginning December 7, 2011 from 1 to 4 p.m. at 407 S. Nelson, Greenville. This American Diabetes Association recognized program includes education on glucose levels, dietary guidelines, and management techniques.  Most insurances cover all or part of the class fees, with a physician’s signature. Registration is required. For more information, call 616.754.6185, ext. 100 or 800.406.4551.

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Winter weather especially harsh for those with diabetes


(ARA) – Trekking through the mall on holiday shopping excursions, shoveling out the driveway and playing in the snow with the kids—every winter, your feet log some long, chilly hours. For people with health issues like diabetes, foot health is especially important when the weather turns cold, as the disease can affect your body’s circulation even more so during the winter months. More than 26 million Americans have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. If you or a loved one have the disease, it’s important to remain vigilant against complications year-round, and especially during the winter when feet are exposed to cold and remain covered up for extended periods.
The American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) offers some podiatrist-approved advice to help those with diabetes maintain good foot health throughout the winter months:
* People with diabetes may experience loss of feeling in the toes and feet, which can be particularly dangerous during the winter. When walking outside, be sure to keep your feet protected from frostbite by wearing warm socks and proper footwear.
* Never walk in the snow in sneakers, dress shoes or sandals. Choose weather appropriate footwear that both fits comfortably and keeps feet dry and warm. You can find a list of footwear that have APMA’s Seal of Acceptance by visiting APMA’s website.
* You probably wouldn’t dream of going barefoot outside in the winter, but you shouldn’t do it inside, either. Always wear shoes and socks when walking outside, and at least wear socks inside. They afford a needed layer of warmth and protection. The type of hosiery you choose is important, too. Look for products made from breathable materials that won’t constrict blood flow, such as CrocsRx footwear. Because moisturizing feet in the dry winter months is also important, foot care products such as AmLactin XL Moisturizing Lotion keep feet and skin healthy while being safe for those with diabetes.
* Wash and inspect your feet daily. Perform your self-exam at the same time every day and watch for changes in skin color, sores, swelling, blisters, peeling, cracking or other signs of problem. When you have diabetes, even a minor wound can become a problem, so don’t wait to see a podiatrist if you develop an injury that’s not healing.
* Stay active. Physical activity aids circulation, which is critical for people with diabetes. Don’t let the cold weather be your excuse for becoming or staying  sedentary. Get regular exercise, and don’t be afraid to do it outdoors. Just remember to properly protect your feet from moisture and cold while you’re outside.
Keeping feet healthy and pain-free can ensure a happy and healthy winter season. If you’re unsure of how to properly care for your feet during winter, or if you experience foot pain or a wound that won’t heal, see today’s podiatrist immediately.

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