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We wanted to make two corrections in last week’s story about Associate Superintendent David Cairy obtaining a new job.

The first correction is that although it is a state-wide job, and he will be based in Lansing, it is not a job specifically with the state of Michigan. Grant money from the State of Michigan funds the project, and is funneled through an Intermediate School District.

It should have read, and was corrected on our website to read: “David Cairy, the associate superintendent at Cedar Springs Public Schools, is leaving his position at Cedar Springs this week to take on a new position as Technology Readiness Infrastructure Grant (TRIG) Project Director. He will oversee the TRIG operations located at, and in partnership with the Michigan Association of Intermediate School District Superintendents, in Lansing. He will also have a home base at the Kent Intermediate School District.”

The Post did not receive a call back by press time from the ISD that the project was originally funded through.

The second correction is that Cairy did not apply for the Superintendent’s job when Andy Booth retired, only when Ron McDermed retired.

We apologize for the error.

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People upset with school decisions


By Judy Reed

The third-floor meeting room at the Hilltop Administration building could hardly hold the number of people who turned out for Monday’s Board of Education meeting. Tension was high as people gathered to voice their concerns about problems they feel are happening in the district, and especially to voice their frustration over a letter read at the previous meeting by board president Patricia Eary.

The letter was a statement to a small group of staff members that the board feels are being negative and trying to undermine the work of Superintendent VanDuyn.

Last week the Post ran a letter to the editor from Board treasurer Michelle Bayink, who said she had not seen the letter prior to its being read, nor did she support it. Many community members FOIA’d the letter, as did the Post. The letter they received, was not, however, the whole letter read at the previous meeting.  One part missing that many were upset with was a statement that said, “If you do not think you can work for the current administration, you are free to seek employment elsewhere.”

Board President Eary apologized at the meeting for the problem with the FOIA. She said she had copied her notes and statement, but for some reason, her computer only copied the notes. She made her entire statement available at the meeting.

Both Eary and VanDuyn said that the recommendation for the statement was made at a workshop that was held in September with a representative from the Michigan Association of School Boards. Eary wrote and read the statement.

“I had been hearing from people that other staff was trying to make me look bad—that they were trying to make me look like the devil,” explained VanDuyn. “And the representative said, ‘You need to make a statement, this has to stop.’ That’s why the statement was made.”

She said that teachers said they had heard that they would lose their sick days if they didn’t use them. VanDuyn said she didn’t know where that came from.  “The teachers have a contract that spells out how much they can carry over.” Another problem arose with instructional rounds that they take three times a year at the schools. Teachers were left off the list through a miscommunication, she said, so she canceled the rounds. “There is never a time Laura VanDuyn would not have teachers on an instructional round,” she said. “It goes against what I believe in.”

Some have complained about cognitive coaches being moved back into the classroom. VanDuyn explained that they needed teachers to fill some classrooms to bring down class sizes, and since a consultant is coming in to analyze their finances, they didn’t want to hire anyone yet. So they moved a couple of coaches back into the classroom. Board President Eary said the board supports that.

One of the things that many people are wondering about is why three top administrators have left this year—Steve Seward, Jennifer Harper, and now associate principal David Cairy. Some have accused VanDuyn of pushing out these administrators.

“Change is hard. It’s not uncommon that administrators leave when a new Superintendent comes,” explained VanDuyn. “Dynamics change.” She said she could not comment on why Harper left, it was a personnel issue. But she said she offered to help Seward with keeping his insurance going, and that she’s enjoyed working with Cairy. “I’m absolutely not pushing people out,” she said. “David and I worked well together.”

VanDuyn said it’s a small minority of people causing the negativity. “I know what I walked into. And there are people I haven’t held accountable, because of that environment. I know who some of them are. I just thought over time the people would understand who I am. I will continue to be who I am—honest, with integrity and a passion for education for both students and staff.”

At Monday’s meeting, several people questioned the board about what’s happening in the district, and spoke of not feeling respected by the board. Teacher Brett Burns said that in the past, the district has been about honesty, integrity and respect, and he felt that some of those things are currently missing. “We’ve lost three pillars in the district and we don’t know why. Why are they leaving?” He challenged the board to start thinking about the staff and students and set some of their personal things aside. “We are at a crossroads—a district divided. I don’t know if the board sees that,” he said. He noted that when they try to communicate a problem, they feel they are shut down. “You have to hear us, even if it’s not what you want to hear. I’m willing to make it happen. We need to learn from our mistakes and move on.”

Several of those commenting mourned the fact that Cairy is leaving. The room gave him a standing ovation, to show how much they respected the work he had done here in Cedar Springs.

Board trustee Brooke Nichols was tearful during a statement she read to the audience. “I know this has been a difficult time for many of us lately and I’m sorry for any added stress the board has added,” she said. She went on to say that she supports anyone that wants to try to move the district forward in a positive manner, and noted that everyone on the board does care about the district.

“It’s up to us to support each other,” she continued. It’s so emotionally draining to carry grudges and hard feelings. I am hopeful that there can be a fresh start…We can’t change all that has happened, but we do have a choice in letting that define us or trying to move forward in a positive light.”

Click here to read a letter from one concerned community resident. To see the letter read at the October 12 board meeting, click link below. If you have questions, please email or call Superintendent Laura VanDuyn at 696-1204, or one of your school board members. You can find them at www.csredhawks.org. You may also write a letter to the editor and we will publish them as space allows.



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Associate Superintendent David Cairy lands state-wide job


David Cairy, the associate superintendent at Cedar Springs Public Schools

David Cairy, the associate superintendent at Cedar Springs Public Schools

David Cairy, the associate superintendent at Cedar Springs Public Schools, is leaving his position at Cedar Springs this week to take on a new position as Technology Readiness Infrastructure Grant (TRIG) Project Director. He will oversee the TRIG operations located at, and in partnership with the Michigan Association of Intermediate School District Superintendents, in Lansing. He will also have a home base at the Kent Intermediate School District.

It’s been an absolutely amazing 14 years here,” remarked Cairy. “When I came here, I was looking for a good job. What I found was a home, a place to raise a family, a community of top-notch educators, and a community that strongly cares about the education of their kids.”

Cairy first came to Cedar Springs as principal of Cedar Trails. He was promoted to associate superintendent in 2007, and has led a variety of educational initiatives as well as serving as the district’s chief financial officer. “The first group of kids I started with just graduated,” noted Cairy. “It’s fun to see a group through from start to finish.”

Cairy is well-loved and respected by parents, community and school staff members. At Monday’s board of education meeting, community member Sue Wolfe finished her comments by saying, “In my 62 years of life, I’ve never known a finer man than Dave Cairy.” The jam-packed room of staff and community members erupted in applause, and gave Cairy a standing ovation.

I was humbled,” said Cairy. “For those folks to think I did a good job means a lot. When that group shows up and says thank you—well, that’s something I will never forget.”

Cairy applied for the Superintendent job at Cedar Springs when Ron McDermed retired in 2014, and stayed on to work with the new superintendent, after the board chose Dr. Laura VanDuyn. “I’ve really enjoyed working with him,” said VanDuyn. “He’s such a good guy. He’s been a great colleague to a whole bunch of folks, and we’re going to miss him.”

While Cairy’s new office will be in Lansing, he won’t be moving from the area.

While I won’t be working here anymore, know my thoughts will never be far from the district,” he wrote in a letter to the staff. “The more talented educator in the family will still be here (his wife teaches at Cedar Springs), and our boys will continue to benefit from our wonderful system. Erin and I chose to live here for a lot of great reasons, and my job was only one of them. Thank you doesn’t even begin to cover how appreciative I am of the opportunity I have had and the support I have felt from this district.”

A consultant is helping the school district find an interim business director until they can hire a permanent replacement for Cairy.

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School board hires new superintendent

red hawkBy Judy Reed

Associate Superintendent David Cairy received a standing ovation from 200 staff members, parents, and community members after his final interview Wednesday evening, but he didn’t get the votes from the Board of Education.

Instead, they voted 5-2 to hire Dr. Laura VanDuyne, a candidate from California, who has ties to the area and was looking to move back to Michigan. She has served as Executive Director of the State SELPA, Contra Costa Special Education Joint Powers Authority since 2010.

The decision angered and saddened many who were present for the interviews.

Trustees Shannon Vanderhyde and Jeff Gust were the two dissenting votes.

The board had the public fill out feedback forms after the interviews and turn them in, and the board sifted through them during recess. They then took a straw poll to see where they stood.

Vanderhyde said that she was saddened by the direction the board seemed to be moving in. She said that one of the comments on the feedback form stuck with her, that Laura would have a big learning curve. “I don’t want my three kids to have a big learning curve,” she said. “I want them to have the best of the best. With Dave, we can start tomorrow.”

Trustee Todd Hanson said he didn’t think there would be a huge learning curve, noting that staff would still be there doing a great job. “And if not, then maybe they are not as loyal as they say,” he remarked.

The remark brought a big boo from the crowd, and several people walked out.

Vanderhyde questioned why they bothered to get the feedback if they weren’t going to use it.

Trustee Joe Marckini said he must’ve gotten different feedback than Shannon, and that he was out talking to people. And if people didn’t like his decision, they could recall him.

Trustee Patricia Eary thought an outsider would bring a fresh perspective. President Brooke Nichols said she had a gut feeling about Van Duyne the first time she interviewed.

Those who voted for Van Duyne—President Brooke Nichols, Todd Hanson, Patricia Eary, Matt Shoffner, and Joe Marckini—all had good things to say about Cairy, but seemed to feel that Van Duyne had the skills to move the district forward.

Shoffner remarked that he felt the two of them working together—Van Duyne a global thinker and Cairy a detailed thinker—would make a good team.

After the official vote, the silence in the room was deafening. Trustee Shannon VanderHyde dissolved into tears.

Some members approached the board and thanked them for their work, while others left the room or talked quietly among themselves.

A committee will work on contract negotiations with Van Duyne, and then bring that back to the board for approval.



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Van runs into school bus

A Cedar Springs school bus was hit from behind by another vehicle Monday morning.

According to Assistant Superintendent David Cairy, the bus was stopped on northbound Algoma at 22 Mile, when a van struck the back of the bus and ended up underneath the bumper of the bus.

Cairy said that they notified police, and transportation supervisor Jerry Gavin went out and checked on the students, as well as arranged transportation for them and the rest of the route to get to school. About a dozen elementary students were on the bus at the time. Cairy said there were no injuries.

“We are very pleased with the way the staff handled it,” said Cairy.

The official police report was not available at press time.


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Kids head back to school

On the first day of school, Alanna Miller was excited to be in kindergarten at Cedar Trails Elementary.

On the first day of school, Alanna Miller was excited to be in kindergarten at Cedar Trails Elementary.

By Judy Reed


School started back up in Cedar Springs this week, and according to Cedar Springs Assistant Superintendent David Cairy, they are off to a great start.

“Talking to parents, staff and students, everyone is excited to be back and looking forward to a great year,” he said.

He noted that with 3,400 kids, there are bound to be a few glitches the first day or two, but that the community and staff work together to make it work.

Some changes this year that parents may notice include new principals at three of the buildings:

Alternative education – Stacy Jeanette, Director of Student Services, took on being principal for New Beginnings. Former principal Dave Schlump retired.

Beach – Ken See, formerly an assistant principal at the high school, is now principal at Beach Elementary. Former principal Jane Hendricksen retired.

Red Hawk Elementary – April Stevens, formerly at the high school, is now principal at Red Hawk Elementary. Anne Kostus has moved to the high school, as director of academic services.

“Anne will help us increase our focus on student achievement at the high school level,” explained Cairy.

Another change parents will notice is that the high school revamped their parking lot over the summer. The loop that is the drop off and pick up has eliminated parking spots, and buses are now picking up and dropping off kids in the bus area only to the west of the school. The parking lot on the other side of the dropoff has also been expanded, and a new access drive installed to relieve traffic congestion. Cairy said that it is working really well.

He said that next summer they will renovate the Cedar Trails parking lot as well. “We’ve grown dramatically in the early childhood center,” noted Cairy. “We have our biggest class ever in kindergarten—350. We have 280 in first grade, and about 260 in second,” he explained. “We are glad that a lot of families are choosing us for education, but this parking lot was not built for that amount of traffic.”

They will be working on plans for the lot throughout the school year.

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