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Tag Archive | "curriculum"

PARENTS RIGHT TO KNOW


 

The Creative Technologies Academy’s Board Policy Manual contains the following policy which is applicable to all Title I schools. CTA does NOT receive Title I funds, nevertheless it adheres to the following policy:

In accordance with the requirement of Section 1111 of Title I, for each school receiving Title I funds, the School Leader shall make sure that all parents of students in that school are notified that they may request, and the Academy will provide the following information on the student’s classroom teachers:

A. whether the teacher(s) have met the State qualification and licensing criteria for the grade level and subject areas they are teaching;

B. whether the teacher(s) is teaching under any emergency or provisional status in which the State requirements have been waived;

C. the undergraduate major of the teacher(s) and the area of study and any certificates for any graduate degrees earned;

D. the qualifications of any paraprofessionals providing services to their child(ren);

In addition, the parents shall be provided:

E. information on the level of achievement of their child(ren) on the required State academic assessments;

F. timely notice if the student is assigned to a teacher who is not “highly qualified” as required, or if the student is taught for more than four (4) weeks by a teacher who is not highly qualified.

The notices and information shall be provided in an understandable format, and to the extent possible, in a language the parent(s) understand.

INSTRUCTIONS MATERIALS — RIGHT TO INSPECT

Parents have the right to inspect any instructional materials used as part of the educational curriculum for their student. Instructional material means instructional content, regardless of format, that is provided to the student, including printed or representational materials, audio visual materials, and materials available in electronic or digital formats (such as materials accessible through the Internet.) Instructional material does not include academic tests or academic assessments.

Affirmed by the Board of Directors, August 9, 2017

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Kingdom curriculum


by Ronnie McBrayer

by Ronnie McBrayer

 

Once upon a time the animals organized a school. They adopted a curriculum of running, climbing, swimming, and flying. The duck was excellent in swimming and flying, but was extremely poor at running, so he had to drop swimming and stay after school for additional practice. This gave the duck’s poor, webbed feet calluses, so he became only average at swimming.

Meanwhile, the rabbit started at the top of the class in running, but had a complete mental breakdown because of so much make-up work in swimming. The squirrel was excellent in climbing, but when her flying teacher made her start from the ground rather than from the treetops, her grades in all subjects plummeted.

The maverick in the school was the eagle. He was stubborn, independent, hardly a team player, and gloated in climbing class that he could beat everyone else to the top of the tree, but he always used his own way to get there. The prairie dogs stayed out of the school altogether because the administration would not add digging to the curriculum.

At the end of the year, none of the animals did very well. An unusual eel that was an exceedingly good swimmer, but that could also run, climb and fly just a little, had the highest cumulative score. He was selected as the valedictorian though his grades were barely above average.

I love that story. Always have. It teaches a lesson so easily forgotten or ignored: Nobody can be great at everything. But everybody can do something exceptionally well. Every person has his or her gift, his or her calling, his or her God-given ability. When it is properly employed, it works like magic. When it is not, or when we all try to do everything, it’s a disaster.

My experience in the church is that we often force individuals “to be something they aren’t,” demanding that everyone do everything. We create fine “animal schools” that foster frustration, shame, and false competition. Everyone ends up tepidly average, and we fail to allow individuals to develop their unique gifts and callings.

We are all gifted differently and radically so; and people must be allowed to explore, expand, and enhance their distinct talents. People must be given space and place to “to their part,” whatever part that is. It’s a principle that works, not only in the animal kingdom, but also in the kingdom of God.

Ronnie McBrayer is a syndicated columnist, pastor, and author. His newest book is “The Gospel According to Waffle House.” You can read more at www.ronniemcbrayer.me

 

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