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Tag Archive | "CPR"

Kent County Sheriff Deputies to get lifesaving equipment


 

When seconds count, it is critical for first responders to have the equipment that can save lives. Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) can make a difference. And soon, Kent County Sheriff  Deputies will have them in their patrol vehicles.

Earlier this month, The Kent County Board of Commissioners approved accepting a grant that makes the purchase of the AED’s possible. The grant was an Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) from the Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance. More than $63,000 was awarded to the Kent County Sheriff Department’s Special Project Fund for the AED’s.

Cardiac arrest—when a person’s heart stops beating and he or she stops breathing—can happen to anyone at any age. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) can keep blood flowing and oxygen going to the brain, but it is critical to get the heart beating normally again as quickly as possible. AEDs are small, portable devices that deliver an electric shock to a person’s heart, which can stop abnormal impulses in the heart and return it to a normal rhythm.

The Edward Byrne Memorial JAG grant will be used by the Sheriff Department to equip patrol vehicles with AEDs. This allows patrol staff to respond to calls related to drug overdoses and other emergency assistance situations and provide defibrillation faster, potentially saving lives. Sheriff Department patrol staff are certified to use AEDs, but do not currently have the equipment available in patrol cruisers.

“There are times when the first responder on a medical emergency call is a Sheriff Deputy, and it could be several minutes before Emergency Medical Services arrive on the scene,” said Undersheriff Michelle LaJoye-Young of the Kent County Sheriff Department. “Our Deputies are trained in several life-saving techniques and this gives them another tool that is far more effective in cardiac arrest cases.”

Without the early use of CPR and AED during cardiac arrest, chances of survival are about 2.5 percent. An AED increases chances of survival to 75 percent; AED combined with CPR increases that to 80 percent. “We’ve heard time and again that AEDs can be used even by an untrained person,” said Jim Saalfeld, Chair of the Kent County Board of Commissioners. “This fully automated, lightweight equipment has saved countless lives. We are grateful to receive this grant which will help our first responders react quickly and efficiently to cardiac arrest incidents.”

The Edward Byrne Memorial JAG supports local activities that prevent and control crime, including law enforcement programs, prosecution and court programs, prevention and education programs, corrections and community corrections programs, drug treatment programs, and planning, evaluation, and technology programs.

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Heart Month


 

The number one killer can strike anyone of any age

By Mary Kuhlman, Michigan News Connection

February is American Heart Month. Many women will wear red to work on Friday, February 5, to call attention to women’s risk of heart disease and stroke.

February is American Heart Month. Many women will wear red to work on Friday, February 5, to call attention to women’s risk of heart disease and stroke.

Michiganders are reminded to keep hearts on their minds as February begins, and not just the Valentine kind. It’s American Heart Month, an annual observance to bring awareness to cardiovascular disease, the nation’s number one killer.

Anna Pitt of Hemlock says she’s lucky to be alive after suffering what’s known as a “widow maker” heart attack, which comes on suddenly. She was getting her son on the school bus when she collapsed.

“They told me at that time I had no pulse,” says Pitt. “They used the defibrillator on me in the driveway, and also three times on the way to the hospital. Now, they said if my son hadn’t done CPR I wouldn’t be here.”

Pitt explains that she had had no symptoms, and with good cholesterol and blood pressure would have never imagined she would be the victim of a heart attack. And because it can save a life, her advice for Michiganders during American Heart Month is to get certified in CPR.

According to the American Heart Association, one-in-three women will die of heart disease, about 46 women in Michigan each day.

Stacy Sawyer, senior director of communications with the American Heart Association in Michigan, says while family history can play a large role in a person’s chance of developing heart disease, there are other risk factors that can be controlled such as high blood pressure and cholesterol, obesity, physical inactivity and smoking. But she adds heart disease can affect anyone of any age.

“Even newborns who are born with congenital heart defects to the elderly,” says Sawyer. “We have survivors who are just in their 20s. So heart disease is something that everyone of every age needs to be aware of and be proactive against it.”

Sawyer recommends everyone knows their numbers, their weight, cholesterol and blood pressure, and speak to their doctor about ways to reduce their risk of heart disease.

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Don’t wait for professionals to help a cardiac victim


HEA-Cardiac-victim

By Mary Kuhlman, Michigan News Connection

Help from a bystander is often the difference between whether a person suffering from cardiac arrest will live or die.

Kelli Sears with the American Heart Association (AHA) says while there are some minor changes in the organization’s guidelines, the most significant emphasis for the public remains to take action even if you’re not formally trained in CPR.

“If you’ve taken a CPR class and have been taught how to give breaths, then the breaths are still recommended,” she says. “If you don’t know CPR and you haven’t taken a class, then we just recommend hands-only CPR or compression-only CPR. Push hard and push fast and do something.”

Sears says the chest compressions should be done at a rate of 100 to 120 per minute, with the beat of the Bee Gees’ classic disco song “Stayin’ Alive” a perfect match for the timing. A quick demonstration of hands-only CPR can be found online at the American Heart Association website.

Sears notes that bystanders getting involved—calling 911, performing CPR and using an automated external defibrillator if one is available—is  especially critical in rural areas where it can take time for emergency crews to respond.

“Having people who can initiate CPR before an ambulance can arrive or before first responders can arrive is vital in giving a patient any chance of survival in a cardiac arrest situation,” she says.

Sears says bystander CPR can double or even triple the odds of survival for those with cardiac arrest but less than half receive such help.

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Man dies in boating accident on Crystal Lake


The Montcalm County Sheriff’s Office responded to a boating accident on Crystal Lake, in Crystal Township, on Thursday, July 4 at about 12:23 p.m.

The caller said that a person had been pulled from the lake and that CPR was being administered. Deputies arrived to find an 18-year-old Perrinton man had fallen from his boat into the water and was unconscious. A number of bystanders had assisted by pulling the man from the water and starting CPR. Among those assisting was a nurse practitioner and a person with lifeguard training.

CPR was continued by Montcalm County EMS and the man was taken first to Carson City Hospital, and later flown to Spectrum Hospital in Grand Rapids.

The victim, Jeffrey Whitehead, 18, was pronounced dead at 8:50 a.m. Sunday by the Kent County Medical Examiner’s Office. No other info was available at press time.

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Diabetes and CPR classes in Greenville


United Lifestyles, a member of Spectrum Health United Hospital in Greenville, is offering a three-session Diabetes Education group class, and a CPR class in May.

Diabetes classes

The diabetes classes will be held on Wednesdays, beginning May 9, 2012 from 1 to 4 p.m. at 407 S. Nelson, Greenville. This American Diabetes Association recognized program includes education on glucose levels, dietary guidelines, and management techniques. Most insurances cover all or part of the class fees, with a physician’s signature. Registration is required. For more information, call 616.754.6185, ext. 100 or 800.406.4551.

CPR class

The CPR class will be on Thursday, May 10, 2012 from 6 to 9:30 p.m. at 407 S. Nelson, Greenville. This comprehensive community class includes CPR for Adult, Infant & Child and Automated External Defibrillation (AED) training. Cost for the class is $40. Registration is required. An on-line renewal option is available. For more information, call 616.754.6185, ext. 100 or 800.406.4551.

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