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Tag Archive | "CPR"

Courtland purchases automatic chest compression device


Courtland Fire and Rescue recently purchased this automatic chest compression device to help give CPR when patients are in cardiac arrest. Courtesy photo.

By Judy Reed

An automatic chest compression device that Courtland Fire and Rescue recently purchased is already doing the job they hoped it would do. 

“We used it on Sunday’s car accident and it returned a pulse with the help of Rockford Ambulance,” said Courtland firefighter Gabriel Skelonc. 

The department purchased the Defibtech with Lifeline ARM for $11,549, with the help of the Courtland Fire Ladies Auxiliary, Courtland Township board, and Courtland Township Fire Department.

Skelonc said that The Lifeline ARM is an automated, portable, battery-powered device that provides chest compressions on adult patients who have cardiac arrest, and is intended for use by qualified medical personnel certified to perform CPR. And when staff on call is limited, it’s a lifesaver for both patients and fire personnel.

“CPR becomes tiresome even after a couple minutes and the volume of staff needed can vary widely during the day to day calls. This device can take the place of up to 6 people doing compressions over 100 times a minute at 2 inches,” explained Skelonc.

He said that it could also be used in other townships where they are called in for mutual aid.

Other fire departments in the area that have a similar device include Algoma, Cedar Springs, Solon, and Kent City.

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Kent District Library Director named Top Librarian in the Nation


KDL Library Director Lance Werner

Lance Werner, executive director of Kent District Library, has been named the top librarian in the nation by Library Journal.

The 2018 Librarian of the Year award honors a professional librarian among nominees from across the country for outstanding achievement and accomplishments reflecting the loftiest service goals of the library profession. Werner was recognized for his strong leadership, effective legislative advocacy and championing access for his over 200,000 patrons in Kent County.

Werner is the first–and only–Michigan librarian to win the Librarian of the Year award.

“My version of leadership is to get the best people I can, give them what they need and then get out of their way,” Werner said. “I’m one gear in a big machine where everyone is important.” Werner credits this philosophy as a cornerstone to building strong advocacy among his team, municipalities, strategic partners and patrons. 

Under Werner’s leadership, Kent District Library:

• Championed access for all by becoming the first public library in the state to offer e-magazines, e-movies, e-comics and streaming video games free of charge.

• Extended the reach of technology by circulating iPads and wireless hotspots community-wide.

• Installed a collection of Little Free Libraries around Kent County. There are currently 14, which are housed in community centers, senior centers, parks and the Gerald R. Ford International Airport.

• Opened a branch in Kelloggsville High School, which will be a community library outside of school hours.

• Began offering healthcare for part-time employees.

• Partnered with other West Michigan libraries to collect 50,000 library materials for the Port Arthur Public Library, a Texas library devastated by Hurricane Harvey.

• Launched a statewide short story contest called Write Michigan, now in its 6th year, which most recently drew more than 900 submissions from children, teens, adults and Spanish-language writers.

• Provided books for military troops stationed in the Middle East.

• Trained all staff members in first aid and CPR.

• Launched adult program series highlighting beer (KDaLe), wine (KDL Uncorked) and coffee (KDL Caffeinated).

• Partnered with The Geek Group and other local organizations to offer innovative programming, including STEM initiatives.

“Working with Lance is exciting,” said Michelle Boisvenue-Fox, KDL’s director of innovation and user experience. “I admire that he has respect for all of our staff and genuinely wants to do the best for our patrons and communities. This shows in the relationships he has grown over the years and our efforts to grow our KDL family to include more and more community groups.”

Werner builds his life around three pillars: kindness, empathy and love.

“I don’t feel like I have a job, it’s more of a calling,” Werner explained. “I’m so blessed to do work that I love, with those that I love, for those that I love. I consider myself a public servant and want to add to the greater good and touch the lives of future generations.”

Werner has been director of Kent District Library since May 2011. He previously served as director of the Capital Area District Library in Lansing and as a library law specialist at the Library of Michigan. He earned a bachelor of arts in psychology from the University of Northern Colorado, a law degree from Michigan State University and a master’s of library information systems from Wayne State University.

“As the 30th recipient of the LJ Librarian of the Year award, Lance exemplifies the dynamism and keen intelligence we expect in a winner,” said Rebecca T. Miller, editorial director of Library Journal and School Library Journal. “His deep understanding of the importance of building and nurturing strong relationships at all levels has resulted in improved service for his community, enhanced benefits for the Kent District Library staff, and improved the outlook for libraries across Michigan. We are very excited to name him LJ’s 2018 Librarian of the Year.” 

Werner will receive a $1,500 cash prize and is featured in Library Journal’s January 2018 issue, available in print and online. Werner was previously a 2016 LJ Mover & Shaker and 2017 Michigan Library Association Librarian of the Year.

About Kent District Library

Kent District Library is a public library system operating 18 branch libraries that serve nearly 400,000 residents of 27 different municipalities throughout Kent County. KDL is an IRS-designed 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by millage dollars and private donations. KDL is a member of the Lakeland Library Cooperative. For more, visit kdl.org.

 

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Solon Fire receives lifesaving equipment


Solon Firefighters with new equipment. (L to R) FF Rich Hays, FF Jordan Nielsen, FF Matt Schievink, FF Scott Johnson, Captain Doug Gabrielse, FF Jack Schmidt, FF Taylor Hunt, Deputy Chief Chris Paige.

In October, the Solon Fire Department was awarded the purchase of an Automatic Chest Compression Device through the generosity of the Firehouse Subs Community Foundation. Solon Fire Chief Jeff Drake said that this equipment recently arrived at Solon Fire Department, and that fire personnel completed the manufacturer’s recommended training. “We have added this equipment to our cache of tools to provide quality service to our customers,” said Drake.

He told the Post that this grant would enable SFD to provide high performance cardiac arrest treatment with three personnel versus the current need for optimally six persons rotating and performing manual compressions. It will give SFD the ability to deliver better CPR and provide a greater likelihood of patient survival.

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Fundraiser for Solon Fire Department


 

N-Fire-department-fundraiser-Auto-chest-compressionSpaghetti fundraiser and silent auction May 31 for lifesaving equipment

By Judy Reed

When someone you know and love is in cardiac arrest, you want to get them the best help possible. That’s why the Solon Township Fire Department is holding an all you can eat spaghetti dinner and silent auction at Big Boy, on Tuesday, May 31, from 5-8 p.m., to raise money for new equipment that will help save lives. Tickets are $10 for adults and $7 for children.

In 2016, there were more than 350,000 instances of sudden cardiac arrest (outside of hospitals), according to the American Heart Association. About 46 percent had CPR performed on them by a bystander, and only 12 percent survived. That might not sound like a high number, but it’s a number that’s climbed over the last several years, thanks to new lifesaving equipment available to paramedics that will automatically do chest compressions. And Solon Township Fire and Rescue is trying to raise money to buy the equipment to treat people locally.

Algoma and Kent City have the equipment, and Cedar Springs purchased it earlier this year after doing a fundraiser. Cedar Springs Fire Chief Marty Fraser said they were first introduced to it by Algoma Fire, who helped them on a call. “It’s an amazing piece of equipment and will help save lives,” he said.

According to Solon Fire Chief Jeff Drake, the equipment is about $15,000. They have received a $2,500 donation, and have also applied for a grant through Lowe’s.

Administering manual CPR is not easy work. It calls for 120 chest compressions a minute, and involves several paramedics. The new equipment would bring that number down.

According to Drake, automatic chest compression devices save precious amounts of time, manpower, and increase a patient’s survival rate substantially. They are safe and efficient tools that standardize chest compressions during cardiac arrest and are in accordance with the latest scientific guidelines developed by the American Heart Association.

One case where they had to use manual CPR occurred in February. The woman’s husband later thanked Solon first responders at a township board meeting. Tom Decker praised the responders for their efforts when his wife, who was in the late stages of Alzheimer’s, collapsed in their home. He began to do chest compressions, and then Solon Fire responded within minutes and took over. They eventually got her heart beating again, and she was sent to the hospital.

“Sadly she did not regain consciousness and passed away on the evening of the second (of February),” wrote Tom. “That was God’s will, not our first responders. At my request, they did everything possible in their efforts to save her. They were obviously well trained, dedicated, driven, and efficient, yet compassionate and understanding…I do want them to know how grateful I will always be for their service to my wife. Even though I don’t know them, they are my heroes.”

Getting the equipment to do automatic chest compressions will help the rescue workers in cases such as Mrs. Decker’s, and others.

You can help by attending the all you can eat spaghetti dinner and silent auction. Some of the items being auctioned off include a TV, Tiger baseball tickets (10th row), Whitecaps tickets, and a $25 Dairy Queen gift card.

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Fire Department purchases life-saving equipment


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Cedar Springs Firefighters show off their new LUCAS automatic chest compression device. Courtesy photo.

By Judy Reed

People living in Cedar Springs who suffer sudden cardiac arrest now have a better chance of survival, thanks to new equipment recently purchased by the Cedar Springs Fire Department.

The CS Fire Department held a spaghetti dinner fundraiser on March 8 to raise money for the LUCAS automatic chest compression device, which would help them give CPR to heart attack victims. The device was $15,000.

“This piece of equipment is costly but well worth the price,” noted Fire Chief Marty Fraser.

March 8 was the Wednesday evening that high winds blew through the area, and many areas were without power. That translated to people going out to dinner, including the fundraising spaghetti dinner at Big Boy.

“We had a large crowd and through the generosity of everyone, raised a sizable amount of money,” said Fraser. “We also had several anonymous donors contribute to our cause.”

The Fire Department made enough to purchase the equipment, and they put it into service on Tuesday evening, March 21. “I and the staff at the Fire Department are very grateful to the community and the surrounding areas for their generosity in making this a very successful project,” remarked Fraser.

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Fundraiser for CS Fire department


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Spaghetti fundraiser March 8 for lifesaving equipment

By Judy Reed

In 2016, there were more than 350,000 instances of sudden cardiac arrest (outside of hospitals), according to the American Heart Association. About 46 percent had CPR performed on them by a bystander, and only 12 percent survived. That might not sound like a high number, but it’s a number that’s climbed over the last several years, thanks to new lifesaving equipment available to paramedics that will automatically do chest compressions. And Cedar Springs Fire and Rescue is trying to raise money to buy the equipment to treat people locally.

According to Cedar Springs Fire Chief Marty Fraser, the department responded to 11 heart attacks in 2016, and two since the first of the year. One of the two did not survive.

Fraser said that each call averages 8 people per call, averaging 60-70 minutes each, and they must do CPR manually. “60-70 minutes is a long time,” he said, adding that manual CPR calls for 120 compressions a minute. He also noted that daytime staffing can also be difficult, with firefighters working during the day.

With an automatic chest compression system, they could do the call with only three people. And the device would keep the patient’s blood circulating, delivering oxygen to organs while waiting for the ambulance to arrive to transport the patient to the hospital.

Algoma Fire and Kent City Fire both have one of these systems, and Algoma brought it to the Cedar Springs City Council to show them how it would help Cedar Springs. The Council then challenged Chief Fraser to do some fundraising for the $15,000 piece of equipment. “We have some money in next year’s budget, but would like to supplement that,” said Fraser.

He also said that the need for the equipment would only increase, with two senior citizens opening in Cedar Springs in the near future.

Their first fundraising event will be a spaghetti dinner on Wednesday, March 8, from 5-8 p.m. at Cedar Springs Big Boy, 13961 White Creek Ave. Tickets are $10 for adults and $7 for children ages 12 and under. Tickets may be purchased from any firefighter or medic. You may also purchase at the door. Call 696-1221 to order tickets. Leave a voicemail, the station will return your call.

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Kent County Sheriff Deputies to get lifesaving equipment


 

When seconds count, it is critical for first responders to have the equipment that can save lives. Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) can make a difference. And soon, Kent County Sheriff  Deputies will have them in their patrol vehicles.

Earlier this month, The Kent County Board of Commissioners approved accepting a grant that makes the purchase of the AED’s possible. The grant was an Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) from the Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance. More than $63,000 was awarded to the Kent County Sheriff Department’s Special Project Fund for the AED’s.

Cardiac arrest—when a person’s heart stops beating and he or she stops breathing—can happen to anyone at any age. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) can keep blood flowing and oxygen going to the brain, but it is critical to get the heart beating normally again as quickly as possible. AEDs are small, portable devices that deliver an electric shock to a person’s heart, which can stop abnormal impulses in the heart and return it to a normal rhythm.

The Edward Byrne Memorial JAG grant will be used by the Sheriff Department to equip patrol vehicles with AEDs. This allows patrol staff to respond to calls related to drug overdoses and other emergency assistance situations and provide defibrillation faster, potentially saving lives. Sheriff Department patrol staff are certified to use AEDs, but do not currently have the equipment available in patrol cruisers.

“There are times when the first responder on a medical emergency call is a Sheriff Deputy, and it could be several minutes before Emergency Medical Services arrive on the scene,” said Undersheriff Michelle LaJoye-Young of the Kent County Sheriff Department. “Our Deputies are trained in several life-saving techniques and this gives them another tool that is far more effective in cardiac arrest cases.”

Without the early use of CPR and AED during cardiac arrest, chances of survival are about 2.5 percent. An AED increases chances of survival to 75 percent; AED combined with CPR increases that to 80 percent. “We’ve heard time and again that AEDs can be used even by an untrained person,” said Jim Saalfeld, Chair of the Kent County Board of Commissioners. “This fully automated, lightweight equipment has saved countless lives. We are grateful to receive this grant which will help our first responders react quickly and efficiently to cardiac arrest incidents.”

The Edward Byrne Memorial JAG supports local activities that prevent and control crime, including law enforcement programs, prosecution and court programs, prevention and education programs, corrections and community corrections programs, drug treatment programs, and planning, evaluation, and technology programs.

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Heart Month


 

The number one killer can strike anyone of any age

By Mary Kuhlman, Michigan News Connection

February is American Heart Month. Many women will wear red to work on Friday, February 5, to call attention to women’s risk of heart disease and stroke.

February is American Heart Month. Many women will wear red to work on Friday, February 5, to call attention to women’s risk of heart disease and stroke.

Michiganders are reminded to keep hearts on their minds as February begins, and not just the Valentine kind. It’s American Heart Month, an annual observance to bring awareness to cardiovascular disease, the nation’s number one killer.

Anna Pitt of Hemlock says she’s lucky to be alive after suffering what’s known as a “widow maker” heart attack, which comes on suddenly. She was getting her son on the school bus when she collapsed.

“They told me at that time I had no pulse,” says Pitt. “They used the defibrillator on me in the driveway, and also three times on the way to the hospital. Now, they said if my son hadn’t done CPR I wouldn’t be here.”

Pitt explains that she had had no symptoms, and with good cholesterol and blood pressure would have never imagined she would be the victim of a heart attack. And because it can save a life, her advice for Michiganders during American Heart Month is to get certified in CPR.

According to the American Heart Association, one-in-three women will die of heart disease, about 46 women in Michigan each day.

Stacy Sawyer, senior director of communications with the American Heart Association in Michigan, says while family history can play a large role in a person’s chance of developing heart disease, there are other risk factors that can be controlled such as high blood pressure and cholesterol, obesity, physical inactivity and smoking. But she adds heart disease can affect anyone of any age.

“Even newborns who are born with congenital heart defects to the elderly,” says Sawyer. “We have survivors who are just in their 20s. So heart disease is something that everyone of every age needs to be aware of and be proactive against it.”

Sawyer recommends everyone knows their numbers, their weight, cholesterol and blood pressure, and speak to their doctor about ways to reduce their risk of heart disease.

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Don’t wait for professionals to help a cardiac victim


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By Mary Kuhlman, Michigan News Connection

Help from a bystander is often the difference between whether a person suffering from cardiac arrest will live or die.

Kelli Sears with the American Heart Association (AHA) says while there are some minor changes in the organization’s guidelines, the most significant emphasis for the public remains to take action even if you’re not formally trained in CPR.

“If you’ve taken a CPR class and have been taught how to give breaths, then the breaths are still recommended,” she says. “If you don’t know CPR and you haven’t taken a class, then we just recommend hands-only CPR or compression-only CPR. Push hard and push fast and do something.”

Sears says the chest compressions should be done at a rate of 100 to 120 per minute, with the beat of the Bee Gees’ classic disco song “Stayin’ Alive” a perfect match for the timing. A quick demonstration of hands-only CPR can be found online at the American Heart Association website.

Sears notes that bystanders getting involved—calling 911, performing CPR and using an automated external defibrillator if one is available—is  especially critical in rural areas where it can take time for emergency crews to respond.

“Having people who can initiate CPR before an ambulance can arrive or before first responders can arrive is vital in giving a patient any chance of survival in a cardiac arrest situation,” she says.

Sears says bystander CPR can double or even triple the odds of survival for those with cardiac arrest but less than half receive such help.

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Man dies in boating accident on Crystal Lake


The Montcalm County Sheriff’s Office responded to a boating accident on Crystal Lake, in Crystal Township, on Thursday, July 4 at about 12:23 p.m.

The caller said that a person had been pulled from the lake and that CPR was being administered. Deputies arrived to find an 18-year-old Perrinton man had fallen from his boat into the water and was unconscious. A number of bystanders had assisted by pulling the man from the water and starting CPR. Among those assisting was a nurse practitioner and a person with lifeguard training.

CPR was continued by Montcalm County EMS and the man was taken first to Carson City Hospital, and later flown to Spectrum Hospital in Grand Rapids.

The victim, Jeffrey Whitehead, 18, was pronounced dead at 8:50 a.m. Sunday by the Kent County Medical Examiner’s Office. No other info was available at press time.

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