web analytics

Tag Archive | "cougars"

DNR showcases cougars in two new displays 


Display: The new mountain lion display at Tahquamenon Falls State Park provides visitors with information on cougars in the Upper Peninsula.

Display: The new mountain lion display at Tahquamenon Falls State Park provides visitors with information on cougars in the Upper Peninsula.

Confirmed reports reach 31 in Michigan

Two cougar mounts recently provided to the Michigan Department of Natural Resources have attracted a lot of attention in Luce County this summer.

According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, cougars—also called mountain lions—were once the most widely distributed land animal in the Western Hemisphere, but have been eliminated from about two-thirds of their historic range.

At one time, cougars lived in every eastern state in a variety of habitats, including coastal marshes, mountains, and forests. They were native to Michigan but were extirpated from the state around the turn of the 20th century.

These big, long-tailed cats typically hunt at night, generally weigh between 90 and 180 pounds, and measure five to six feet from the tip of the nose to the base of the tail.

One of the DNR’s two cougar mounts is on display at the “Fact Shack” at the Upper Falls at Tahquamenon Falls State Park, which is situated off M-123, about 25 miles north of Newberry.

 Poached: A mountain lion poached in Schoolcraft County in 2013 is now on display at the Department of Natural Resources customer service center in Newberry.


Poached: A mountain lion poached in Schoolcraft County in 2013 is now on display at the Department of Natural Resources customer service center in Newberry.

“The cougar was donated by the GarLyn Zoo in Naubinway and was a captive animal that died of natural causes,” said Theresa Neal, park interpreter at Tahquamenon Falls. “The display features information about cougars in Michigan, an actual cougar track cast and information on how the DNR handles reports and sightings of cougars.”

The second cougar mount can be seen at the DNR’s Newberry customer service center, located off M-123, just south of Newberry. This glass-encased cat was received by the DNR at the close of a cougar poaching case in Schoolcraft County.

During the 2013 muzzle-loader deer hunting season in the Upper Peninsula, conservation officers received a tip that a cougar had been killed at a hunting camp near Seney.

“The investigation revealed the animal was shot and wounded with a rifle when it entered a field near the camp,” said DNR Sgt. Mike Hammill. “The following day, the cougar was tracked down and killed by one of the suspects.”

Hammill said the suspects returned home to Bay City with the cougar, intending to mount the animal.

“Before this took place, three suspects were identified, interviewed and ultimately arrested and the cougar was recovered,” Hammill said. “The suspects involved were all convicted, served jail time, paid several thousand dollars in fines, costs, and restitution, and lost hunting privileges for several years.”

Hammill said that as a part of the sentence, the shooter was required to pay the cost of having the animal mounted.

In August, the cougar mount was displayed at the DNR’s Pocket Park during the Upper Peninsula State Fair in Escanaba. Following the fair, the cougar was exhibited at the Schoolcraft County Courthouse in Manistique, before returning to the Newberry DNR customer service center earlier this month.

Meanwhile, the DNR has confirmed 31 cougar reports in the Upper Peninsula since 2008, but so far there remains no evidence confirmed of a breeding population.

“Within the last decade, numerous cougar sighting reports have been received from various locations in Michigan and are investigated by DNR Wildlife Division’s cougar team,” said Kevin Swanson, a DNR wildlife biologist in Marquette.

The most recent confirmed mountain lion report occurred in September with DNR verification of a trail camera image in Dickinson County.

“This situation is not unique to Michigan but has been occurring in many other Midwestern and eastern states as young males disperse from core range areas in the western United States,” Swanson said.

All of Michigan’s DNR-verified cougar reports have come from the Upper Peninsula, where 12 of the region’s 15 counties have had reports.

Marquette County has led the confirmed cougar reports with six; Menominee County has had four; Houghton, Delta and Mackinac counties have had three each, while Baraga, Chippewa, Luce, Schoolcraft and Ontonagon counties have each had two and Keweenaw and Dickinson have had one each.

Of those confirmed reports, 21 involved photos, eight were tracks, one was video and scat and the remaining confirmed report was that of the cougar poached near Seney in Schoolcraft County in 2013.

To learn more about cougars in Michigan, visit www.michigan.gov/cougars.

Information about Tahquamenon Falls State Park, including maps and the nature program schedule, can be found at www.michigan.gov/tfallseducation.

Posted in Featured, OutdoorsComments (0)

Red Hawks lose against Cougars


Cedar Springs senior Cameron Umphrey scored the lone touchdown for the Red Hawks against Catholic Central, after grabbing a pass one-handed. Photos by K. Alvesteffer/R. LaLone

Cedar Springs senior Cameron Umphrey scored the lone touchdown for the Red Hawks against Catholic Central, after grabbing a pass one-handed. Photos by K. Alvesteffer/R. LaLone

Red Hawk defender Lane Gott bats away a pass intended for a Cougar receiver. Photos by K. Alvesteffer/R. LaLone.

Red Hawk defender Lane Gott bats away a pass intended for a Cougar receiver. Photos by K. Alvesteffer/R. LaLone.

by Lauren VanDenHout

Last Friday, September 18, the Cedar Springs Red Hawks faced off against the Catholic Central Cougars. In this match, the Hawks weren’t only battling the opposing team, they also found themselves pitted against the natural elements. The severe downpour that took place in the second half of the game was a major challenge the team had to overcome. Unfortunately, the Red Hawks fell to the Cougars 29-6.

Scoring the only touchdown for the game was senior Cameron Umphrey. In the second quarter, the halfback sprinted for a 33-yard touchdown, after he snatched the ball with only one hand on a pass.

Defensively, the Hawk’s line was impenetrable for two quarters. The boys denied the Cougars into their endzone during the first and third quarter. In the first quarter, senior Da’Marcus Barnett punted the ball to the 11-yard line, making it quite the challenge for the Cougars to return it for a touchdown. Powerful tackles made by seniors Barnett and Taylor VanDyke, and freshman Ryan Ringler were key in stopping Catholic Central on the offensive.

Mother nature decided to step in during the second half of the game. This drastic weather change made it difficult for either team to score. Catholic Central is considered to be more of a passing team, where as Cedar Springs takes more to running the ball for its offensive strategy. The rain worked out more in the favor of the Hawks since their sense of offensive style isn’t affected as much as Catholic Central’s. This factor enabled the Hawks to put more pressure on the Cougars to keep their lead.

In the last quarter, Cedar Springs quarterback Collin Alvesteffer reinjured his ankle. While attempting to advance the ball up the field, Alvesteffer appeared to have almost slipped in response to the heavy rain around him as he tried to avoid the Cougar’s defense.

The Cedar Springs Red Hawks now have a record of 2-2. Their next game is home at the Red Hawks Stadium, at 7:00 p.m. They will host the Wyoming Wolves, who have an overall record of 1-3.

Posted in Featured, SportsComments (0)

DNR confirms cougars in eastern Upper Peninsula


This trail camera photo of a cougar was taken on public land in western Mackinac County in early November. Another photo was confirmed in Chippewa County in late October. 

Cougar evidence confirmed in U.P. 26 times since 2008

 

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources has confirmed two recent photos of a cougar in the eastern Upper Peninsula, marking the 25th and 26th times cougar evidence has been verified in the U.P.

One of the photos was taken with a camera phone in late October on private property near Chippewa County’s Raber Township. The other was taken in early November by a trail camera on public land in Mackinac County near Garfield Township (see above). The DNR has not received permission to release the Chippewa County photo.

With the verification of these two photos, the DNR has now confirmed the presence of cougars in 11 Upper Peninsula counties 26 times since 2008. The animals are believed to be young individuals dispersing from established populations in the Dakotas in search of new territory; there is no evidence of a breeding population of cougars in the state.

The DNR’s Wildlife Division welcomes citizen reports of possible cougar evidence or sightings. Cougar photos and other evidence, such as tracks, scat or cached kills, should be reported to a local DNR office or through the DNR’s online reporting form at www.michigan.gov/cougars.

 

Posted in Featured, OutdoorsComments (0)


advert
Advertising Rates Brochure
Ensley Team Five Star Realty
Kent Theatre

Get the Cedar Springs Post in your mailbox for only $35.00 a year!