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City to study Sheriff proposal for policing


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By Judy Reed

 

With Cedar Springs Police Chief Roger Parent retiring in September, the Cedar Springs City Council has a choice to make: either hire a new police chief, or contract with the Kent County Sheriff Department to provide law enforcement for the city of 3,500-plus residents.

Last month the City Council directed City Manager Thad Taylor to ask Sheriff Larry Stelma to provide a cost for the same level of service the current police provide. The Sheriff and his team presented Taylor and Chief Parent with a proposal last week that contained two options to consider.

“It’s not quite apples to apples but as close as they can get,” explained Taylor.

Currently, the Cedar Springs Police Department has six full-time officers (not including the Chief), four part-time officers, three unpaid reserves that work special events, one unpaid chaplain, and a part-time clerk. The police provide 30 hours a day of patrol. Three officers work 10 hours each, with two officers on duty during 9 p.m. and 3 a.m. There is then one day per week where they are all scheduled, although not all are usually working. “It’s a day where they can take vacation, or comp time,” explained Taylor. “It’s just the way the schedule falls so they get an 80-hour pay period.” That equals 10,140 hours of patrol per year.

The Chief works 40 hours a week, 50 weeks a year. That equals 1,980 hours yearly.

The clerk works 20 hours weekly, for 1,040 hours.

That is 13,160 hours of law enforcement accountable to the City. Last year’s police budget came in at $681,190. The 2014-2015 budget is projected at $685,511. (According to Chief Parent he gave back some of his budget to the city last year.)

Under the Sheriff Department proposal, option 1, they would provide one patrol officer on duty at all times—24 hours a day, 7 days a week. In addition to the patrol officer, they would provide a Sergeant to work a 40-hour week. The Sergeant would provide supervision and command staff support, and work with the City leadership to establish the agenda and direction of the patrol officers. The Sergeant would also provide additional services, which could include neighborhood watch, business watch, presentations, communications to city officials, working with the schools, and some zoning enforcement.

Detective services, scientific support, record management (an $11,000 savings), management reports, IT and radio service support for mobile equipment, dispatch services ($35,537) would all be included.

Vehicle costs would be provided free of charge for the regular patrols, but the city would be responsible for the sergeant’s at $350 per month. They would provide a vehicle credit for the current police cruisers.

All uniforms, equipment, supervision, liability and training costs would be provided at no additional charge. Cars and uniforms could look the way that Cedar Springs wants them.

The patrol officer would provide 8,760 hours of straight patrol. The sergeant would provide the same amount of hours as the Chief—1,980.

While it appears to be less patrol hours, according to the Sheriff, they would actually provide 338 hours of more patrol time, because the detective bureau would compensate for approximately 16 percent of the city officer’s patrol time—the time they spend following up on investigations for felonies, warrant processing, and other follow up. Based on 2013 calls for service, that would equal 1,718 hours of service.

Clerical support would be provided at no charge and would include things like sex offender registration, gun permits, records checks, freedom of information reports, etc. Clerical support is available in Grand Rapids or at the north substation. The part time clerk that works two days a week could be at the north substation, or possibly relocated to Cedar Springs City Hall.

This entire option would cost $560,384, a potential savings over last year of $120,806.

Option 2, would be exactly the same, except instead of a sergeant to provide supervision, they would provide a community policing deputy. The deputy would provide the other services such as neighborhood watch, business watch, working with city officials, schools, etc. That option would be $548,306 per year.

While it looks like the Sheriff proposal would be a savings, there is also the human element to consider. All of the city’s full time officers—six of them, several with 10 to 14 years of service—would all have to reapply for their jobs.

“The Council has to decide what the current officers bring to the community,” said Taylor. “They give us a good level of coverage, similar to what the Sheriff proposed, but double coverage between 9 p.m. and 3 a.m. These are officers that have made a commitment to the community—they work here because they want to be here. They know the community, and that’s very important in law enforcement. And people know them. How do you quantify that? They’ve made a commitment and are very dedicated. That’s not saying anything against any deputy; we just don’t have the certainty that they would be here any longer than a year or two. It’s difficult to imagine one being here for 14 years, like Officer Chad Potts has been.”

Taylor also noted that the current clerk is at City Hall 5 days a week to help people if an officer is not in. That might not be the case under the new options.

Another point to think about is if the Council decides to go with the Sheriff Department to save the money formerly spent on law enforcement, what will they use that money for? To lower taxes? Make road improvements? New sidewalks? Something else? “People will want to know how it’s going to impact them,” said Taylor.

He explained that the Sheriff department proposal would be a new way to provide law enforcement to the community, but he thinks the City Council needs to engage the public and find out what they want. “It’s a huge decision,” he remarked.

The Sheriff Department will have representatives at the June 12 City Council meeting at 7 p.m. to answer questions from Council. The Council is also expected to announce at that meeting a date for a special meeting just to hear comments and questions from the public on what they want.

In the meantime, you can contact City Manager Thad Taylor with comments at manager@cityofcedarsprings.org, or one of the City Council members. Just go to www.cityofcedarsprings.org, and click on council. Choose one of the names and click on it. It will give you a bio of the council member and an email address.

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From the Mayor’s Desk


By Bob Truesdale

 

Yesterday, on my way to church, we drove past a home on 5th Street, where a family was parking their second car on the grass, just off their single gravel driveway, leading to a one-stall garage. It has been that way since I was a kid.

But, it brought to memory, a former city manager, who rode with a uniformed police officer, in a marked police car, targeting these families, who were violating some type of a city code—families who were already struggling in our poor economy. We can only hope and pray these Gestapo tactics are now behind us.

I heard a present member of our planning commission say, “I liked it the way it was in the past,” which I took to mean he felt we had too many codes and it was not our business to regulate everything people do.

I agree with you. 2014 can be a year of healing. As for me, I can never have too many friends, as we move forward. Please join us at 7 p.m. tonight (Thursday) for our annual City Council meeting at City Hall. Some exciting projects are being proposed.

Humbly, your friend,

 the mayor

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Burns chosen for Spring Lake job


 

Christine Burns

By Judy Reed

 

Cedar Springs City Manager Christine Burns may be headed for the top job in Spring Lake.

The Village announced Monday that Burns was their top choice for the Village Manager position, with James Freed, who manages both the Village of Lakeview and the City of Stanton under a shared services agreement, as an alternate.

According to Bill Baldridge, the consultant to the Michigan Municipal League who ran the search, Spring Lake held interviews with their top four choices on Saturday, June 2. Afterward, the council discussed the candidates and narrowed their choices to their top two.

“It was very close between the two candidates, and what strengths they would bring the village,” explained Baldridge. “But Chris seemed to be the leader.”

The Post asked Burns how she felt when she got the call letting her know she was chosen for the job. “I was pretty excited,” she said. “Spring Lake is such an awesome community.”

But the thought of leaving her coworkers saddens her. “My staff rocks. I’ve never worked with a better group of people. They are hard workers, and they are friends. The hard part is leaving them. But I am excited for other opportunities.”

While negotiations have already started, nothing will be set until after June 11. That’s when a judge will rule on whether a petition to disincorporate the Village of Spring Lake is valid. The Village maintains it’s not valid, because they are a home rule village. According to information from the Michigan Municipal League, home rule villages have nothing in their charter that allows them to disincorporate. They would have to insert a provision in their charter permitting them to do so before they could disincorporate.

If the judge rules in the village’s favor, Burns can accept the position if she chooses to. If the judge rules that the petition is valid, it will appear on the August 7 ballot, and everything would be on hold until after the voters make a decision.

Meanwhile, Burns is meeting with department heads to work on a transition plan, and is not taking on any new projects. If things go forward, she will ask for an August 1 start date. She will also meet with the Mayor Charlie Watson and the city attorney, so they can begin to work on a replacement.

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Community cleanup gets wash down


The weather was not kind to the 30 people who showed up to for the annual Cedar Creek clean-up in Cedar Springs, Saturday, April 16.
According to City Manager Christine Burns, all the groups that signed up showed up, except one that said they would do some picking up at a later date. It was the least amount of volunteers they have had for the cleanup, but it didn’t dampen her spirits.
“Even in the rain we put a pretty good dent in it,” said Burns, who explained that they had an hour of cleanup before the rain started at 11:15 a.m. “It really stung,” she said.
She noted they had a good showing for the E-waste, with a container that was half full.
Burns noted that all costs associated with the event were defrayed through sponsorships, except the cost of the trash bags. Choice One Bank covered the cost of the t-shirts for volunteers and Independent Bank covered the pizza party afterward.  @Home Computers sponsored the E-waste portion of the cleanup. “We couldn’t do this without all of them,” she said.
Whether this event will return next year is up in the air due to possible budget cuts.

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