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Tag Archive | "Chadrick Brown"

Bad day


Rev. Chadrick Brown

Solon Center Wesleyan Church

15671 Algoma Ave NE

Cedar Springs, MI 49319

 

As you read this, let me ask you a question and then I want you to pause and really think about it. How’s your day going? How has your week been? Good? Bad? Here’s a little way you can tell if it’s going to be a rotten day. 

You know it’s going to be bad when you see a Fox news team in your office. Or, you call Suicide Prevention and they put you on hold. It’s going to be a bad day when you turn on the news and they’re showing emergency routes out of the city. Or, when your twin sister or brother forgot your birthday. It’s going to be a bad day when your car horn goes off accidentally and remains stuck as you follow a group of Hell’s Angels on the freeway. Or when your boss tells you not to bother to take off your coat. It’s going to be a bad day when your income tax check bounces. Or when you put both contact lenses in the same eye. All these scenarios will create one bad day.  

I hope some of those things put a smile on your face, but here is the reality—we are in for some bad days no matter what we do or don’t do. So, friend, this may be a lame encouragement, but it helps get me through some tough days and brings some perspective. There is always someone who has it worse off than I do. Be thankful you’re not that person, put a smile on your face, walk tall and stay strong. The bad day will end. Another day will come. God is watching over you and He cares and loves you so very much. And just a word of advice… as Spring comes, watch out for those Hell’s Angels that may be coming down 131. 

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Honesty


Rev. Chadrick Brown

 Solon Center Wesleyan Church

15671 Algoma Ave NE

Cedar Springs, MI 49319

 

When my wife and I meet, she had long, beautiful, blonde hair. I loved her hair. It is what initially attracted me to her. She kept her hair long and blonde until we had our first child and then off to the chopping block she went to get rid of it. I think I cried that day. Don’t get me wrong; my love for her didn’t change, nor did her beauty, but the hair was no more. She told me she would grow it back and she did. But every few years, once she gets it back to the way I like it, she cuts it off. And then comes the question that she always asks me after the hair gets cut: “Honey, what do you think? Do you like it? Do you like my hair cut?” And in my mind I scream, “No, no, no, no! I do not like it. I love your hair long and blonde. I want it long.” But then I quietly answer out loud, “Of course honey, I love it. It’s beautiful.”

I don’t think I am the only one that has ever done this. We all have had people in our lives ask a question and then answer them by telling them what they want to hear. Television sitcoms often depict funny situations where a person says what they think another person wants to hear. In fiction, it’s funny to see a person tell their boss or spouse what they want to hear.

Unfortunately, these situations aren’t funny when they really occur in our lives. We all want to have people in our lives who answer our questions honestly even when the honest answer may not be a pleasure to hear.

In Proverbs 24:26, from the Message Translation of God’s word, it says, “An honest answer is like a warm hug.” How awesome is that? How comforting is that?

Honesty is hard at times. But it’s necessary. Why? It’s necessary to build trust. It’s necessary to have healthy relationships. It’s necessary if we are ever going to get beyond the surface of relationships and begin to go deeper. It’s necessary if we are ever going to truly help each other and comfort each other.

I want to challenge you today to build your relationships on honesty. You will enjoy the peace of mind that comes from knowing your friend is always giving you an honest answer. Your friends will enjoy the trust and confidence of a relationship where they can be honest without fearing repercussions if you don’t like their answer to your question. Everyone in a relationship benefits when it’s built on honesty.

And yes, I practice what I preach. I always tell my wife that her hair is beautiful, no matter what the length of her hair is, even though she knows, I miss her long hair.

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Caution: dodging potholes


Rev. Chadrick Brown

Solon Center Wesleyan Church

15671 Algoma Ave NE | Cedar Springs, MI 49319

 

With all the freezing and thawing we have had lately, I have noticed a whole lot more potholes on the road. Some of which take my car right out of commission if I am not watching. It may be time to put some of those orange signs out that simply say CAUTION.

You know another area in our lives that I have found that all of us should approach with caution is in our words and within our conversations. Do you remember the childhood saying, “Sticks and stones will break my bones, but words will never hurt me?” Of course you do. We all remember that rhyme and have more than likely said it a time or two.

We use to say that in order to let bullies know they were not going to get under our skin. But in reality, that childhood rhyme is not so true. Name-calling really hurts down inside. All of us have been hurt by someone calling us names and more likly than not, we have hurt someone else with our words. We can say that little phrase all day long and to whomever we want to, but being called names really does hurt us deeply.

Someone said that we should handle words carefully because they have more power than atom bombs. It’s true! When we are getting ready to say something we shouldn’t say, we need one of those big orange caution signs to pop up in our minds to help stop us or at least to help us choose our words wisely.

God’s Holy Bible is the greatest book for showing us how to live a balanced life. It says, “Be quick to listen and slow to speak” (James 1:19). Can I say that again? “Be quick to listen and slow to speak.” If there were ever a bright orange sign saying CAUTION, I think that would be it. When we speak quickly, we speak dangerously, possibly hurting other people along the way. Words can be painful when spoken in anger or jealousy or fear. And the words we choose not only affects the moment, but they can have lasting affects for a lifetime. We need to choose them carefully. I have found that words are so powerful. They have the power to hurt, but they also have the power to heal. What’s the deciding factor? The choice you make. The caution you take by choosing your words.

So friends, just as we have to slow down to avoid some of those potholes that are out there on the road, let’s all slow down before we respond to someone. Let’s be cautious. Let’s be careful of what we say. Let’s really listen and then choose our words wisely and lovingly. Let’s begin to heal our community and start with our words.

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Pay it forward this season


Solon-Center-Wesleyan-webRev. Chadrick Brown

Solon Center Wesleyan Church

15671 Algoma, Cedar Springs 

(just north of 19 Mile)

 

 

A little while ago, I started watching a movie that I hadn’t seen in a long time. It came out back in 2000 and even back then it was a good movie that had the potential to really move people. What’s the movie? Pay It Forward. Have you seen it? Have you watched it again recently?

Even though the movie is not a Christmas movie, let alone a new release, it has some great things for us to remember this Christmas season. This movie is simply about the random acts of kindness started by a young boy who had a simple dream to make the world a kinder place. He wanted to start a new world order where random acts of kindness would be passed from one person to another until the whole world became one big happy family. What a great idea.

Isn’t this what Christmas is all about? Acts of kindness. Acts of love. Acts of gentleness. Acts that encourage other people. Can I tell you something? The very first Christmas was no random act of kindness. It was a deliberate act of love. God sent His son to this world to show you how much He loves you. Now that is something incredible to realize. But we can do more than just realize it; we can experience it, feel it and share it.

So, I want to encourage you. Go do some random acts of kindness. Be a part of making our community feel like a family. Help someone, say a kind word, smile more.  Look into people’s eyes when they are talking and be kind. Be part of the solution, not part of the problem. I also want to encourage you in this way: the next time you do your random act of kindness, do it with God in mind. Because when we do something on behalf of God, we begin to imitate Him in a profound and wonderful way. We start to become what God desires each of us to become, people that look out and help other people. People that care for each other. People that encourage each other.

The teacher in the movie Pay It Forward gave this young boy a chance to do something great. God has given us the same chance to do some great things as well. This Christmas season, let’s be deliberate about our kindness and remember that it all started with God sending us His Son.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.

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Rough Spots


Solon-Center-Wesleyan-webRev. Chadrick Brown

Solon Center Wesleyan Church

15671 Algoma Ave NE

Cedar Springs, MI 49319

 

Michigan has a lot of things going for it, the great lakes, the in-land lakes, the rivers that run all through it, the sand dunes, beautiful lighthouses and a ton of golf courses. Some of these places are absolutely beautiful, but I can’t golf if my life depended on it.

One of my best friends a while ago was a semi-pro golfer and instructor. Quite often, he would invite me out, just to hang out and deepen our friendship. Each and every time he asked, I would decline. Not because I didn’t want our friendship deepened, but simply because he was a semi-pro golfer and I was simply terrible. In fact, I really don’t like the game. I’ll drive the cart in a heartbeat, but don’t make me play. But just like a good friend, he would not take “No” for an answer. He kept inviting me and told me that he would show me a few tips and help me with my game to make me a better golfer. Well, I gave in, but every time, without fail, I was terrible and could not get that little ball to straighten out. You would think as a pastor, God would have given me the gift of playing golf, but He didn’t, so I’ve given up on golf.

But I did hear something interesting. When they first manufactured golf balls, they made the covers smooth. Then it was discovered that after a ball had been roughed up, one could get more distance out of it. So they started manufacturing them with dimpled covers. That’s why the golf ball looks the way it looks today.

That got me thinking. Isn’t that how life is? It takes some rough spots in our lives in order to make us a better person. It takes some bumps and bruises to help us understand and gain wisdom. It takes going through difficulties to truly appreciate the good times. And it takes our trust being broken to really understand how special it is to trust someone again.

So friend, the next time life gets a little hard or difficult, don’t get upset, discouraged, or even mad. Just see what you can take away. Don’t get depressed, or try to get even with a person for the bumps and bruises they have caused you. But see what you can learn to make you go farther in this life. Here is a fact of life that we all know. Difficult times come and go, so let the difficulties in life make you better, not bitter; stronger, not sourer. See how bumps in your life can take you farther.

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