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Tag Archive | "Cedar Springs Middle School"

Daddy-daughter dance February 1


Buy tickets now—none available at the door

 

On Saturday, February 1, there will be a night to remember for 200 families. The 10th Annual Daddy Daughter Dance will be put on by the Cedar Springs Area Parks and Recreation Department at Cedar Springs Middle School. This event has grown every year and is one of the most special moments of the year for many young girls in the Cedar Springs area. The dance is for girls of age 3 through the early teen years and the male role model in their lives. We understand that not every young lady has a father in their life, but they have a male that they look up to and that is special to them. That person may be an uncle, grandfather, older brother, or somone else. They can be the one that attends and helps create memories. The dance can be attended by anyone, not just residents of Cedar Springs. It is important that young ladies can have a night of fun and a chance to make memories that will last them a lifetime.

The dance is hosted by a father and daughter DJ service, Diverse Sounds, and has punch and snacks for the attendees as well. The doors will open for the event at 6:30 p.m. at the Cedar Springs Middle School and the dance will kick off at 7 p.m. Included in the ticket price is a craft project for each girl to work on with their date while at the dance, and 5×7 photos that will be taken of each couple and provided after February 14. Noah’s Animal Workshop will be at the dance offering special stuffed animals to commemorate the night for an additional fee.

Tickets are on sale now during daytime office hours at Hilltop (8 a.m.-4 p.m.)  and at the Middle School on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 6-9 p.m.  There is only room for 200 families and half of those are already reserved, so do not wait until the last minute. Tickets in advance are $15 for two people, or $20 for three, or $25 for a group of four or more.  There will not be any tickets available at the door.

For more information call 696-7320 or email director@csaparksandrec.com. We are also on Facebook and have a new website www.csaparksandrec.com, with mobile application and text alert options.

 

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Rachel’s Challenge coming to Cedar Springs Middle School


Rachels-ChallengeOctober 29 at 7:00pm

Each day 160,000 students do not go to school because they are bullied, teased and harassed. By turning the story of a tragic death at Columbine High School into a mission for change, Rachel’s Challenge is helping create safer learning environments and making a world-wide impact.

And it’s coming to Cedar Springs Middle School on October 29, at 7 p.m. The Cedar Springs community is invited and encouraged to come to this free presentation.

More than 19 million people have been touched by Rachel’s message, and they continue the legacy of making a difference in their communities. Each year at least 2 million more people are added to that number. These are just a couple of the results of Rachel’s Challenge. In one survey, 78% of students indicated they would definitely intervene in a bullying incident in their school after seeing Rachel’s Challenge. In the last 3 years, Rachel’s Challenge has received nearly 500 unsolicited emails from students stating that after hearing Rachel’s story they reached out for help as they were contemplating suicide. Some even state that “Rachel saved their life.”

rachels handRachel’s Challenge is a series of student empowering programs and strategies that equip students and adults to combat bullying and allay feelings of isolation and despair by creating a culture of kindness and compassion. The programs are based on the writings and life of 17 year-old Rachel Scott who was the first student killed at Columbine High School in 1999. Rachel left a legacy of reaching out to those who were different, who were picked on by others, or who were new at her school. Shortly before her death she wrote,

Rachel’s Challenge is a non-profit, non-political, non-religious organization based in Littleton, Colorado.

“I have this theory that if one person can go out of their way to show compassion, then it will start a chain reaction of the same. People will never know how far a little kindness can go.” 

Rachel’s Challenge was started by Rachel’s dad and stepmom, Darrell and Sandy Scott when they realized that the writings and drawings Rachel left not only had an impact on her friends and classmates, but also resonated with students around the world. Although Rachel was a typical teenager who even wrote about her “ups and downs,” she had a passion and conviction that she would someday change the world. The Scott family knew her story and passion had to be told to inspire others to make their world a better place.

Please attend this free presentation with your family on October 29 at 7:00 p.m. You won’t want to miss it!

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Home party expo to raise funds for new library


Do you like to go to home parties? Maybe you want to buy local this Christmas season. We have the perfect opportunity for you to accomplish all of that and more. The Cedar Springs Library is raising funds towards a new building and is holding a large home party sale on Saturday, November 2, 2013. The sale will be at the Cedar Springs Middle School on the corner of 16 Mile and Northland Drive. The event runs from 9 a.m. until Noon and is free to attend. There will be over a dozen home businesses represented, and the home business consultants will be donating a portion of sales to the library fund and are also donating items for you to win through a door prize system. So what are you waiting for? Come on out and have some fun shopping while supporting a great cause! Call Amanda at CS Area Parks and Rec at 696-7320 for more info.

 

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Taking the next step


Students show support for anti-bullying campaign

Cedar Springs Middle School students had a “white out” last Friday, May 12, and was one of several schools that participated in a helicopter flyover as part of the be nice. campaign (against bullying). Photo by Joe Corriveau.


By Autumn Fish

 

Students at Cedar Springs Middle School wore white last Friday to signal solidarity against bullying and participate in a helicopter flyover.

For the past couple of weeks, students at Cedar Springs Middle School have been learning about bullying and working out ways to get rid of it completely. A group of GVSU students and the West Michigan Mental Health Foundation visited CSMS last week as a part of the be nice. campaign, which encourages kindness and civility among all students.

To take the campaign to the next step, the Mental Health Foundation teamed up with Amway and Fox 17 News to fly a helicopter over participating schools. Students from middle schools and high schools across west Michigan were involved in this campaign. At CSMS, students gathered in the field on the west side of the school to form the words “be nice.” The helicopter then flew over the students to take aerial pictures of the words they created. Other schools involved included Grandville Middle School, Grandville High School, Grandview Elementary School, Century Park Learning Center, Forest Hills Central Middle School, West Catholic High School and Timberland Charter Academy in Muskegon Township.

Students also came together by having a school-wide white out in which all students and staff wore white in order to discourage bullying.

Following the flyover, teachers were able to bring their students to an assembly in the large group room of the middle school. Students from Cedar Springs High School directed the assembly. They presented a few skits and talked to students about bullying and other difficulties they may face as they enter high school. The skits exhibited troubles faced in high school such as bullying, drinking, smoking, depression, peer pressure, suicide, and more. CSHS students stressed the importance of keeping an open mind when students are in high school; to realize that they will eventually have to make choices that will change their lives. CSMS students were able to hear first hand about things that really do happen in high school by students that are currently going through those situations. Over 350 students and staff members attended the assembly put on by the high school students.

CSHS students can only hope that their presentation helped students of the middle school prepare for high school, to help them understand what to expect. What middle school teachers have been telling their students all along is true: They really are going to go through these troubles in high school.

To learn more about the be nice. campaign, visit www.themhf.org/index.php/education/be_nice1/

Autumn Fish is a junior at Cedar Springs High School.

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One step at a time


By Autumn Fish 

Students at Cedar Springs Middle School received a wake-up call Tuesday, May 8, when a group from the Kent County Mental Health Foundation visited their school to present an assembly for a campaign known as be nice. The goal is to open the eyes of young students in communities across Michigan to help them realize how large of a problem bullying is.

The presentation started out by showing a video created by the State of Michigan Surgeon General. The video, created using only text, pictures, and music, showed many teens across Michigan who had taken their lives because of bullying.

According to Christy Buck, Executive Director of the Mental Health Foundation, suicide is the second highest cause of death among teens and college students in Kent County. Buck said that statistic is higher than both the national and state statistic, where it’s the third leading cause of death. Bullying is often a precipitating factor to suicide.

“Talking about it helps prevent it, and students need to recognize the factors that contribute to it. We wanted to take a proactive approach and operate on the model that everybody needs to be nice, rather than anti-bullying, or saying don’t do this or that,” she explained. “We target the 80 percent that are good kids and give them the tools and ammunition to make it work.”

Together, students had brainstorm sessions during the assembly to think of ways that they can keep making a difference in their school. Students were able to think of different events and activities that they could do at school to help eliminate bullying.

This Friday, May 11, CSMS students will be wearing white in memory of those who have been bullied or to those who may have taken their lives because of bullying. At a designated time, the students will all conglomerate in the field next to the middle school as a helicopter does a flyover and take aerial pictures. The helicopter flyover is also a part of the be nice. campaign and will also be traveling to other schools across west Michigan the same day.

Earlier this year, Cedar Springs High School also had a presentation similar to the be nice. campaign. Speaker Laurie Stewart, from LA Stewart Presentations, in Kalamazoo, came to talk to students about being the difference in their school. This assembly seemed to really open the eyes of many students at CSHS. Following Laurie’s presentation, a climate group was created. This group consists of about 20 students from different cliques in the high school. The idea of this group is to keep students from forgetting about what they learned during the assembly; to keep students from losing their motivation to change the climate of the school.

Students can make the difference as long as they are willing to work for it; one step at a time, students can be the change they want to see.

Autumn Fish is a junior at Cedar Springs High School. Post Editor Judy Reed also contributed to this story.

 

 

 

 

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Daddy daughter dance a big hit


The bond between a dad and his daughter is pretty special, and over hundreds of  dads and daughters got to experience that Saturday night, February 4, at Cedar Springs Middle School.

The 8th annual Daddy Daughter Dance, put on by Cedar Springs Area Parks and Recreation, keeps getting bigger every year, and this year’s dance was no exception. A little over 300 attended last year’s dance, and this year’s dance had a record 430 dads and daughters. The dance, held the first Saturday in February, is for girls ages 3 through early teens and their dad, grandpa, uncle, or other father figure.

Dads and daughters danced to the music of a daddy-daughter DJ team, and dances included the cha-cha slide, the hokey pokey, the locomotion, Footloose, the chicken dance, and a slow one—Butterfly Kisses.

The girls were also able to purchase and make stuffed animals with special clothing, even a Daddy Daughter Dance t-shirt.

“It was a special night that will create memories for all that attended,” said Amanda Gerhardt, organizer and Director of Parks and Rec.

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Middle School Geographic bee winner


Madison Scheuneman is the winner of this year’s Geographic Bee at Cedar Springs Middle School.
Each of the 16 Social Studies classes at the school sent their two best geography students to represent their class in the school bee this year.  The contestants were tested on their knowledge of the geographic features of the United States.
The students were given a series of question and were knocked out of the competition when they answered their third question incorrectly– a simple 3-strikes and you’re out method.  It took over 40 questions to get the group of 32 down to the top four.  8th grader Brian Jones did well finishing fourth.  7th grader Brayden Harper (who was also the runner up in the spelling bee) and last year’s winner Evan Kobayashi were knocked out on the same question, finishing in 2nd place.
Madison Scheuneman was down to her last strike but managed to prevail.  The final question that eliminated the boys was:
“Pamlico Sound is located west of Hatteras Island in which state?” The answer is North Carolina.
Madison is an 8th grader in Mr. Glyshaw’s class and is described by her peers as very competitive.  She is the daughter of proud parents Allison and Dennis Scheuneman and the granddaughter of Sara and Bill VanHorn. She will find out in the coming weeks if she is selected to move on to the second round of competition at Western Michigan University.

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Sexting: Pornography or high tech flirting?


By Judy Reed

It’s something no parent wants to hear—that their child is texting nude or semi-nude photos of themselves to others, or that their child is receiving them. But it is happening on a larger scale than parents might think, and it is not just high school age kids involved.

According to Sherie Kopenski, security at Cedar Springs Middle School, they have tackled three cases this year. “That doesn’t sound like a lot, but one is too many,” she said.

The Cedar Springs Police Department has also been involved in the cases. “If your teen has access to a cell phone, there’s a chance that they have received or sent naked photos,” said Police Chief Roger Parent.  “Sexting used to be between a young couple, boyfriend-girlfriend, but it has recently become an accepted practice for young teenagers who are not in a relationship.  A recent comment during an investigation that ‘Everyone’s doing it’ was alarming.”

The latest case was a 14 year-old female sending nude photos to a male friend of similar age, who was not her boyfriend. He showed the photos to others, and according to Parent, it spread so much in school that it became a school issue, and the police also got involved.  The case is being forwarded on to the prosecutor’s office.

“Given that these images are often minors, officials are taking a hard line approach and may charge the parties involved in an effort to discourage the practice,“ explained Parent.

He said that what parents need to talk to their teenage children about is that the person sending a nude or partially nude photo, even if of themselves, is in violation of existing laws.  The person who receives the photo is in violation by possessing it and other laws address distribution of the photos to others.

He said the prosecutor is looking at it on a case-by-case basis. “It falls under underage porn. She created it and disseminated it. The boy is in possession of it. If he sends it on without permission, that also falls under bullying,” said Parent. And parents need to know that if one of the teens involved is 17 or older, they will face an adult judge.

Kopenski noted that it could have serious side effects. “It’s a lot bigger than we realize. It’s criminal, but there’s the emotional aspect, too. The female sends it to her boyfriend, and then it gets disseminated. She then becomes traumatized.”

Asst. high school principal April Stevens said they haven’t run into cases of sexting affecting classes. “I’m not naïve enough to think it’s not going on, but we haven’t experienced that,” she said.

Several high school students have confirmed that it does go on at the high school level.  “It’s mostly girls sending photos of themselves to boys they want to date or sleep with. The boys then show them around or forward them,” they said. They added that they don’t think the kids look at it as being criminal.

The teens said that many kids also engage in sexually suggestive talk without photos—usually with a member of the opposite sex. “Like if you called a 900 number,” they explained.

A recent study by the National Campaign to prevent teen and unplanned pregnancy showed that one in five teen girls have texted or posted nude or semi-nude images of themselves, and that 39 percent of teens have sent sexually suggestive text messages or emails to other teens.

“Teens are vulnerable and can be very naïve,” said Parent. “Often they do not see all of the ramifications to this problem once involved. Sending a nude photo to a close friend can become a photo for all to see on Facebook or the Internet.  Photos are quickly shared with others and there is no easy way to delete or retract them.”

“It’s disturbing. It’s out there and moving on,” said Parent.

So what is a parent to do?
1.    Talk to your kids about what they are doing in cyberspace.
2.    Know whom your kids are communicating with.
3.    Consider limitations on electronic communication.
4.    Be aware of what your teens are posting publicly.
5.    Set expectations.
Download a complete copy of “5 Tips to help parents talk to their kids about sex and technology” below.

Sexting Parent Tips

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