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Tag Archive | "Cedar Springs High School"

CSHS & H Productions Present: 110 Stories 


csps-110stories

From the first crash at the Towers to a last goodbye at Ground Zero, 110 Stories takes us through 9/11 as told by those who were there.

Cedar Springs High School Auditorium

November 9, 10, 11 and 12 Curtain at 7:00pm

Tickets available at the door or https://hprodcshs.ludustickets.com/index.php

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Upcoming Band Performances


6th Grade Band Off  to A Great Start 

The 2016-2017 school year is off to a great start in the 6th grade band.  130 band students are learning to play instruments for the first time, and they are have already progressed quite a bit.  Band Directors Adam Borst, Ryan Miller, and student teacher Adam Ronning are very impressed with the students’ abilities so far, and are looking forward to another great year of band at Red Hawk Elementary.

The budding instrumentalists are playing flute, clarinet, trumpet, trombone, baritone, and percussion, and will later have the chance to try tuba, French horn, and alto saxophone.  The students will perform 3 full band concerts this year: November 17th, February 9th, and May 18.  There is also a solo event on January 26th. All concerts start at 7:00 pm, and are performed in the High School Auditorium.

High School Marching Band heads to State Finals

CONGRATULATIONS to our Cedar Springs High School Marching Band who placed 3rd in their class at the Jenison Invitational October 22, 2016!  They had the best show of the season and scored an 87.725, the highest score of the past few seasons! The band performed Saturday, October 29 at the Westshore Invitational held at Rockford High School at 7:30pm where Cedar Springs placed 3rd.

The band will perform on November 5 at MCBA State Finals at Ford Field mid-afternoon.  Go Red Hawks!

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The Post travels to Sweden


Joyce Jones, left, traveled to Sweden to visit former exchange student Sonia Frangsmyr-Dermes, right. 

Joyce Jones, left, traveled to Sweden to visit former exchange student Sonia Frangsmyr-Dermes, right.

At the end of August, Joyce Jones traveled to Umea, Sweden, to visit a friend and former Cedar Springs High School foreign exchange student, Sonia Frangsmyr-Dermes. Umea, located in northern Sweden, is the cultural capital of Europe, and also known as the “City of Birches.”

“We met in high school as she came from Sweden as an exchange student, and then graduated from Cedar Springs High School together in 1963,” explained Joyce. “Sonia has been here many times to visit and renew acquaintances, and I have visited her in Sweden numerous times. Some members of our graduating class meet once a month over breakfast, and Sonia was able to join us this past August.”

Thank you, Joyce, for taking us with you!

Are you going on vacation? Take the Post with you and snap some photos. Then send them to us with some info to news@cedarspringspost.com or mail them to Post travels, PO Box 370, Cedar Springs, MI 49319. We will be looking for yours!

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Former CS basketball coach named Coach of the Year


Dave Schlump (left), of Cedar Springs, receiving the 2016 BCAM Men’s Junior College Coach of the Year award.

Dave Schlump (left), of Cedar Springs, receiving the 2016 BCAM Men’s Junior College Coach of the Year award.

The Basketball Coaches Association of Michigan (BCAM) recently named Dave Schlump, of Cedar Springs, as the 2016 BCAM Men’s Junior College Coach of the Year. The prestigious award comes after the Muskegon Community College (MCC) men’s basketball team, where Schlump serves as head coach, ended their 2015-16 season, with an overall record of 24-7 and a 2nd place finish in the MCC Athletic Association Western Conference.

The MCC Jayhawks were ranked 8th in the nation in the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJAA) DII final poll, after starting the season unranked. They were the Region 12 District 9 tournament runner-up, losing a hard fought battle 87-90 to Lansing Community College in the finals. Four of Coach Schlump’s players earned All-Conference honors, with another being named to the All-Defensive Team.

According to MCC, Schlump started his coaching career at Evart High School and Kent City High School. In 1991, he accepted the position of Varsity Basketball Coach at Cedar Springs High School (CSHS). Cedar Springs had suffered through a 30 game losing streak spanning over the two previous seasons. During his first season he, along with his coaching staff and the athletes, were immediately able to halt the losing streak. From there he began to build the foundation for a successful high school basketball program.

“Throughout my 14 seasons at Cedar Springs, I was fortunate to coach many outstanding basketball players, and more importantly, outstanding young men,” remarked Coach Schlump. “I have been pleased to send many of these players to the college level to continue their educational and playing careers.”

At the conclusion of the 2003-2004 season, Schlump felt he was ready for the next challenge in his coaching career. He pursued an Assistant Coach position at Ferris State University (FSU), where he had previously earned his Bachelor’s Degree. While at FSU he helped the program achieve success in the GLIAC. During his time there, the Bulldogs won a Conference Championship and advanced to the Sweet 16 nationally. While at Ferris he gained valuable experience with the overall operation of a college basketball program. This experience includes recruiting and prospective player evaluations, along with day-to-day practice organization and individual skill development.

Coach Schlump retired from Cedar Springs Public Schools, but still lives in the community with his wife of 30 years, Teresea. They have three children: Josh, Elyse, who is an assistant women’s basketball coach at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, NY, and Dan.

MCC Athletic Director Marty McDermott was quick to congratulate Schlump and said, “Dave has been a tremendous advocate for basketball at all levels throughout his career and continues to help student-athletes reach their basketball and career goals.”

When asked what this award means to Schlump, he humbly replied, “This means a lot coming from fellow coaches. It all stems from having great players and assistant coaches.” Currently, Jimmy Booth, a 2004 CSHS graduate, serves as both Schlump’s Assistant Coach and an Assistant Athletic Director.

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An Advocate that puts kids first


NOTICE: The Cedar Springs Post welcomes letters of up to 350 words. The subject should be relevant to local readers, and the editor reserves the right to reject letters or edit for clarity, length, good taste, accuracy, and liability concerns. All submissions MUST be accompanied by full name, mailing address and daytime phone number. We use this information to verify the letter’s authenticity. We do not print anonymous letters, or acknowledge letters we do not use. Writers are limited to one letter per month. Email to news@cedarspringspost.com, or send to PostScripts, Cedar Springs Post, PO Box 370, Cedar Springs, MI 49319.

* We only print positive letters about candidates one week prior to the election.


 

An Advocate that puts kids first

The quality of a child’s education will have a lasting and powerful impact on their future and the future of their community. Working as a licensed social worker with families and children, I have seen the evidence of this firsthand.

As an alumna of Cedar Springs High School, my hope is that every child in the Cedar Springs Public School District receives an education that serves as a solid foundation for success. In order for that hope to be a reality, the children of Cedar Springs need a school board member who will put their needs first.  Our children deserve an advocate who will ask the tough questions and who recognizes the complexity of today’s educational environment.

When I first met Heidi Reed years ago she was raising three young boys, working full time, and still finding a way to strongly support a group of CSHS Varsity softball players. She was an avid supporter of extracurricular activities, recognizing that learning happens both inside and outside the classroom.

In the years since, Heidi Reed has only deepened her commitment to the children of CSPS and the community.

As the wife of a current CSPS teacher and the mother of three young gentlemen, including two current CSPS students, she has firsthand knowledge of the current successes and challenges of Cedar Springs Public School District.

As an active member of our community, she supports local organizations that have a direct, positive impact on our children. She already has a proven record of putting the kids of CSPS first by regularly attending school board meetings, serving on the Sinking Fund Committee since 2010, and working on the 2016 District Improvement Team.

The children of CSPS deserve a school board member who will put them first. They deserve an advocate who knows the current needs of CSPS students firsthand. Heidi Reed will be that advocate.

On election day, please consider putting the children of CSPS first by voting for Heidi Reed.

Heather DeLine, MSW, LSW, Nelson Township

CSHS Class of 2007

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Student arrested for school violence threats


red-hawk-art-web

By Judy Reed

A threat of school violence on social media got a 17-year-old student arrested last week.

According to the Kent County Sheriff Department, last Friday morning, September 30, students at Cedar Springs High School reported to the administration that they saw a threat on a social media website referencing a school shooting. The Kent County Sheriff Department and the administration then began to investigate the threat.

According to Superintendent Dr. Laura VanDuyn, the administration officials immediately notified Kent County Sheriff Department’s School Resource Officer Tom McCutcheon. He and detectives investigated the matter, and determined there was no threat to students.

A 17-year-old Cedar Springs student was arrested in connection to the threat, but the teen’s name has not yet been released. The investigation is still open.

The Post received a phone call from a parent Friday morning, who stated that several students, including her daughter, were upset because they had heard about the threat through social media, but no one at the school was talking about it with the students. According to VanDuyn, an announcement was made to the students about it.

“The safety and security of our students and staff is most important to us,” said VanDuyn, in a letter sent to staff and parents. “We take all concerns about safety and security very seriously. We are working to assure our students, staff, parents and community that there is no cause for concern for safety.

“This is an isolated incident that was spread through social media. Both the CSPS District and the KCSD will act swiftly and properly to handle this matter with regard to Board Policy, State law and student discipline code.

“I want to thank our students for reporting this matter to the high school administration and the SRO. I want to thank our administrators, SRO and KCSD for handling this matter so well.

“I encourage parents to reassure your children that there is no reason for concern. I would also encourage you to talk with your children about internet and social media safety and proper use.

“Please call me at any time on my cell or office phone, should you have questions or concerns.”

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Show your Spirit


CSPS-Spirt-Themes

Fall 2016 Cedar Springs High School Athletics Spirit Themes all attending are encouraged to participate

September 1 – Beach Out Football vs Sparta

September 9 – Red White and Blue Football vs Greenville

September 16 – Black Out Football vs Northview

September 23 – Neon Out Football vs GR Christian

September 24 – Red Out Cross Country Red Hawk Invite

September 28 – White Out Tennis vs Cadillac

September 30 – White Out Football vs Lowell

October 4 – #Rickerstrong Soccer vs Greenville

October 7 – Pink Game Football vs FHN

October 14 – Red Out Football vs FHC

October 20 – Black Out Volleyball vs FHE

October 21 – 80s Night Football vs Ottawa Hills

November 4 – Gray Day Band During the School Day

Come out and support Red Hawk Athletics.  Follow on Twitter @Cedar_Athletics

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Community shows outpouring of support for teen with cancer


 

Fundraiser Aug. 23 to help with treatments

Brison Ricker, 15, was on the Varsity soccer team at Cedar Springs High School last year, before being diagnosed with a brain tumor.

Brison Ricker, 15, was on the Varsity soccer team at Cedar Springs High School last year, before being diagnosed with a brain tumor.

By Judy Reed

The greater Cedar Springs community and beyond has wrapped its arms around the family of a local teen with a rare brain tumor, and the alternative cancer treatment they are working so hard to help raise funds for is showing signs of working—something that conventional cancer treatment did not do. In fact, the latest MRI on 15-year-old Brison Ricker shows that the tumor has shrunk to 1/3 the size it was previously.

It’s definitely a miracle—especially when you find out that Brison’s parents—Brian and Kim Ricker, of Nelson Township, were told less than two months ago by their conventional oncologist to take Brison home and call in hospice because he didn’t have long to live.

Before symptoms began last fall, Brison was a happy, well-liked and athletic teen, who loved riding dirt bikes with his younger brother Preston, and playing soccer. According to Kim, Brison raced motocross and supercross, and came in second place in the state for the two classes he raced in. He also was on the Varsity soccer team as a freshman, and voted offensive player of the year.

His symptoms started around Thanksgiving time with dizziness. “He’s extremely active, so I told him to drink enough water, not to get dehydrated,” explained Kim. The symptoms continued and progressed to blurred vision and seeing double, so she made an appointment with their pediatrician after the first of the year. “They said it was an eye issue and sent us to an eye doctor, who prescribed him glasses. “We got those and they didn’t work,” said Kim. “I had a feeling they wouldn’t. I suspected it was something major.”

Kim asked the pediatrician to schedule an MRI to see what was going on, but he didn’t think it was anything major. “I had to fight with him about it. I finally said I’m taking him to the ER to get an MRI then, and he said o.k.” Brison had the MRI and they got the diagnosis on January 22: the MRI showed a rare and deadly childhood brain tumor called Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine glioma (DIPG), which is nearly always fatal and lacks an effective treatment, according to Stanford University.

According to a news article from Stanford’s medicine news, DIPG affects 200-400 school-aged children in the United States each year and has a five-year survival rate of less than 1 percent; half of patients die within nine months of diagnosis. Radiation gives only a temporary reprieve from the tumor’s growth. In addition, it is inoperable. It grows through the brain stem, where breathing and heartbeat are controlled, “with the healthy and diseased cells tangled like two colors of wool knitted together,” said Michelle Monje, MD, PhD, assistant professor of neurology at Stanford.

Brison Ricker (seated) with Dad (Brian), brother Preston, and Mom (Kim).

Brison Ricker (seated) with Dad (Brian), brother Preston, and Mom (Kim).

The news of Brison’s tumor was devastating for the family. “There’s not words to describe how it felt. We were horrified. Our whole world was crashing down,” shared Kim. She said she also questioned God about it. But Brison’s faith and the support of family and friends helped keep them steady. “He has handled it like a champ. We get strength from him. He has a very strong faith, as do we. And, as soon as we found out, our room was filled with friends from church who came to pray. It helped our focus to be on God’s word and not what the doctors are telling us; to focus on God’s promises and not the diagnosis,” explained Kim.

A Gofundme page was set up for donations, and Team Brison (you can find them on Facebook) began putting together numerous fundraising events to help the family. And people began to pray.

Brison first underwent radiation, and did several alternative treatments at home to help fight the cancer, including eating a strict, healthy, organic diet. Kim said they wanted to go to the Burzynski clinic in Texas in March, when Brison’s radiation was done, because they offered an alternative treatment that had had some success with patients. But she said that the oncologist recommended against it, because he said he had seen people do that and waste their money.

The cost for the first month of treatment down there would be $30,000, and it would be a minimum of $17,000 per month after that. None of it would be covered by insurance. Not to mention the loss of income they would suffer. Faced with that and the fact that the oncologist recommended against it, they didn’t go.

But Brison continued to deteriorate. He lost 25 pounds, and his liver was under stress. The steroids he was on for inflammation broke down his muscle and skin and contributed to fatigue. By the end of April, he needed help to stand, sit, and walk. And his tumor had grown 6mm bigger, and there was swelling in his brain. He continued on steroids and the alternative treatments he was receiving locally.

On June 18, Brison went to the ER because his symptoms were progressing, and had another MRI. The news was devastating—his tumor had doubled in size from just six weeks before and was spreading to other parts of his brain. “The doctors say there are no clinical trials available anywhere for him and there is nothing left that they can do for him, and sent us home to cherish the precious time we have together. They suggested that we call Hospice and said at the rate the tumor is growing they believe his time is very limited,” wrote Kim in a Gofundme update on June 19.
“We went home and called the Burzynski Clinic right away,” said Kim. She researched a few other clinics, but the Burzynksi Clinic was the only one that had any success with treating that type of tumor. And Kim was able to talk with the mother of a 14-year-old that had been treated there, which helped them make their decision. “We prayed about it and felt this is where God was leading us,” she wrote. Additional gene-targeting meds were going to add another $40,000 to the cost, and they didn’t know how they were going to be able to keep the treatments going, but they trusted God and went.

They originally thought they would be there a month, but came back a bit sooner. Some additional new meds the clinic wanted to start him on wouldn’t have been covered there, but the oncologist here agreed to work with them and offered to give them to Brison here, which meant they would be covered by insurance. They still, however, have thousands and thousands of dollars in expenses to be met for other meds.

On Thursday, August 8, they received some amazing news: not only was the tumor one-third the size it was, but it was dying from the inside out. His oncologist here was surprised. “He said he’d never seen any results like this, that basically we were in a gray area of medicine from a regular oncologist’s point of view, because they hadn’t seen this combination of treatments before,” said Kim.

She also spoke with Dr. Burzynski this week, and he wants to continue with the treatment and get an MRI in four weeks. “There is some controversy between the doctors on how treatment will go moving forward but we’ll work it out,” she said. “The main thing is Brison had great results. He is tired and worn, but holding steady. Steady is good. If he was not on this treatment, he would not be with us.”

Kim said that the family has been overwhelmed with the support that they have received, even from people they don’t know. Brison is in awe of it all, especially the little notes or gifts he gets from people. She hopes people will continue to show Brison how much they care about him. “He thinks those gifts and notes are pretty awesome,” she said.

One of the ways their faith in God has helped them through this, is to see how it has affected other people. “A ton of people have said how our faith has strengthened them. It’s amazing to see how through all this we are touching and encouraging people and making their faith stronger,” remarked Kim.

While Brison received good news about his tumor, he is not out of the woods and will need more treatment, which means continuing expenses for the family, and they can only continue the treatments with your help. Another fundraiser has been set for August 23 at Cedar Springs High School at 6:30 p.m. All proceeds will go to benefit Brison. Speakers are Tracey Casey-Arnold, founder/CEO of W.I.T. Wellness Consulting, founder of WIT Ministry and Whatever it Takes Radio Network; and Matt Lehr, former NFL football player, NPC Super Heavy Weight and GASP athlete, and NPC Texas Judge. Arnold will speak about using faith to help win in life; Lehr will speak about overcoming adversities. Tickets are $25 each, with the option to donate more. They ask that you please purchase tickets ahead of time at: http://www.eventbrite.com/e/brison-ricker-fundraiser-event-with-tracey-arnold-and-matt-lehr-tickets-26959235800. Or go to eventbrite.com and search for Brison Ricker.

For info on this and other fundraisers for Brison, search for the Team Brison page on Facebook.

To donate directly to Brison, visit https://www.gofundme.com/brisonricker or send a check to Brison Ricker, 5370 Dio Dr., Cedar Springs, MI 49319.

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Blood donors help save lives of baby girl’s parents


 

When they needed it most, blood transfusions were readily available

N-Blood-donors-Grace-Brunett-Family-OutdoorsGrace Brunett is not only a regular blood donor, but helps host a blood drive in her hometown. And as if that weren’t enough, this tireless cheerleader works for Michigan Blood as a phlebotomist.

Grace can trace her commitment to her days as a student at Cedar Springs High School, where she learned in anatomy class the power of O-negative blood—her type and a universal option for anyone in need.

Just nine percent of the Michigan population has O-negative blood, which puts Grace in a class by herself. But her story is even more compelling since the day nearly six years ago when, while pregnant with her firstborn, she developed chorioamnioitis.

She eventually underwent an emergency Caesarian section. During her ordeal, which lasted nearly five hours and included an emergency hysterectomy at the age of 21, she required a blood transfusion.

“I almost died,” she says, noting that she was conscious during the entire trying episode. What she took away from that traumatic experience, however, were two rewards: One, a daughter Charlotte, now going on six years old. And two, a personal story to share about the importance of stepping up to donate blood and blood products.

Grace actually began donating blood as a student at Cedar Springs, where, coincidentally, she met Cory Brown, the father of their child. “I was a sophomore and he was a senior,” she relates. Both were members at the time of Business Professionals of America, which was sponsoring a blood drive at the high school.

Little did they know then that not only would Grace lean on blood donors for her own vital needs, but that Cory, too, would come to require multiple transfusions. “He was in a car accident before we had Charlotte, back in 2007, and then in 2011, he was hit by a drunk driver,” says Grace. In both instances, her common-law husband needed donor blood.

Today, the happy trio makes its home in Cedar Springs, where Charlotte – described by mom as being “bubbly, fun and smart” — is a whiz at jigsaw puzzles and is set to start kindergarten this comi.ng fall. Grace is diligent about giving blood for obvious personal reasons, and also because it’s just the right thing to do. She enjoys tracking her progress, pint by pint, acknowledging that she just passed the 6-gallon mark this past March.

It’s fun for her to travel back in her mind to those days in anatomy class, when the instructor mapped out how “With O-negative blood, you can basically save anybody,” she says. “It’s kind of awesome, that the whole world is basically eligible for my blood, and so that has spurred me to action.”

“It’s one hour out of one day just every two months of your life,” says Grace. “You can be selfless in that single hour and make a huge difference.”

Michigan Blood is the sole provider of blood and blood products for more than 60 hospitals in Michigan, including Spectrum Health, Metro Health, and Mercy Health St. Mary’s. Donations given outside of Michigan Blood do not have direct local impact. Donating blood with Michigan Blood helps save the lives of patients in Michigan hospitals. Any healthy person 17 or older (or 16 with parental consent) who weighs at least 110 pounds may be eligible to donate. Blood donors should bring photo ID. We are currently in urgent need of O-Negative blood donations.

The next blood donor drive in Cedar Springs will be on August 23, at Cedar Springs United Methodist Church, Gym, 140 S Main St., Cedar Springs, 12:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. For more locations, visit www.miblood.org.

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Fundraiser for Brison Ricker


ENT-Ricker-fundraiser

Would you like to be inspired and help out someone in need at the same time? Then mark your calendar and purchase tickets to hear some great speakers at Cedar Springs High School on Tuesday, August 23 at 6:30 p.m. All proceeds from tickets sold will go to help local teen Brison Ricker, who is suffering from an inoperable brain tumor.

Speakers are Tracey Casey-Arnold, founder/CEO of W.I.T. Wellness Consulting, founder of WIT Ministry and Whatever it Takes Radio Network; and Matt Lehr, former NFL football player, NPC Super Heavy Weight and GASP athlete, and NPC Texas Judge. Arnold will speak about using faith to help win in life; Lehr will speak about overcoming adversities.

Tickets are $25 each, with the option to donate more. They ask that you please purchase tickets ahead of time at:  http://www.eventbrite.com/e/brison-ricker-fundraiser-event-with-tracey-arnold-and-matt-lehr-tickets-26959235800. Or go to eventbrite.com and search for Brison Ricker.

For info on this and other fundraisers for Brison, search for the Team Brison page on Facebook.

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