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Tag Archive | "cedar springs city council"

Library groundbreaking next Saturday, July 9


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Years of plans and dreams are finally coming true—Cedar Springs is really going to have a new, much needed library building! The Library Board chose the contractor at their June 27 meeting, and a groundbreaking is scheduled for Saturday, July 9 at 5:00 p.m. near the Cedar Springs Fire Station, at the corner of Main and W. Maple Street. Everyone is invited. See the ad on page 11 and watch the Library website and Facebook Page for activities being planned for this event.

You may have read in The Post or The Bugle that over 900 people of all ages have signed up for the Library’s Summer Reading Program. This growth, along with the significantly increased use of the Library in general, has taken place in spite of not having adequate room. Your Library Staff is persistent regardless of the obstacles.

The current library building has only 2,016 square feet. The new library will have 10,016 square feet, a well-deserved treat to the citizens of Cedar Springs and surrounding communities.

Library Director Donna Clark is excited about what this groundbreaking means for Cedar Springs. “I have the distinct privilege of being the Library Director of our community library at this historic moment of groundbreaking, but I do not stand alone,” she said. “I’m only one, standing on the foundation prepared from the early 1800s to this present day, by a long line of educators, professionals, town folk, volunteers, and enthusiastic people of vision and hope. I celebrate with you who have served your local library as library employees and board members, and with our great City, who is walking this journey with us. I love it that we are building a whole City block of beauty and culture for future generations.”

There are new developments every week because the Library Board and several committees are meeting regularly to accept the bids of contractors and subcontractors, to choose materials, and to keep up with all of the details that require timely attention. “One of the most significant contributions of time during the past two years has come from Duane McIntyre, who will continue to serve as the Project Construction Manager at no charge. This represents a huge savings to the donors and citizens of our communities,” said Community Building Development Team Chair Kurt Mabie. “Many others have also contributed hundreds of hours to reach this milestone so that this dream could come true. Thank you to everyone! These gifts of time are extraordinarily meaningful and are greatly appreciated.”

A finance committee, made up of a good mix of local, respected professionals, is keeping track of the donations that are being made to the Community Building Development Team (CBDT) and the Cedar Springs Public Library. Donations for the new building and its contents are still very much needed and greatly appreciated.

This new library building is just one facility planned for the Heart of Cedar Springs, thanks to the CBDT and the Cedar Springs City Council and Planning Commission. They have all brought their influence to bear on raising funds and negotiating with governmental entities, as well as making sure the right people are available to support the many needs of such a large undertaking. Kent County is a wonderful place to live, thanks to a history of good leadership and smart planning. What is happening in Cedar Springs fits perfectly into the scheme of friendly, up-and-coming communities throughout Kent County. The value of these projects to the residents and businesses of Cedar Springs, and to all of northern Kent County, cannot be overestimated.

The Heart of Cedar Springs will include the following projects that are critical to the continued growth of Cedar Springs.

A library, designed and developed as a place to gather, a place where educational opportunities can be extended, a place where a community can meet, grow and learn together.

An amphitheater where outdoor plays, musicals, movies, concerts and more will fill the summer days and evenings for residents, as well as a place of respite for White Pine Trail and North Country Trail enthusiasts.

Rain Gardens and a Sculpture are a part of the continual beautification of Cedar Creek and its historic flowing spring, which will provide multiple opportunities for several school districts to collaborate with science experiments, and participate in research that can benefit Michigan water way protection and development. The new library will be a great source and meeting place for these classes.

A Boardwalk and Bridges along the Creek, initially running from Main Street to the White Pine Trail but eventually spanning through to Riggle Park and 17 Mile Road to be enjoyed by walkers, nature enthusiasts, and fishermen.

A Community Center that can be used as a FEMA crisis center, as well as provide a beautiful venue for wedding and retirement receptions, and many other community and personal celebrations and gatherings.

A Recreation and Fitness Center where the Parks and Recreation Department, various other recreational and fitness organizations, schools, and individual residents can focus on health and wellness as a community.

All of north Kent County will benefit and appreciate these facilities and open spaces. The value they bring to the Cedar Springs Community will be a legacy for years to come. Please get involved now to be part of this legacy.

Tax deductible donations can be made out to the Community Building Development Team and sent to treasurer, Sue Mabie, 15022 Ritchie Ave, Cedar Springs, Michigan 49319.

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GWENDOLYN CLAIRE PERRY


 

26C-obit-PerryGwendolyn Claire Perry, 88, of Cedar Springs, passed away Tuesday, June 28, 2016 and went to be with her Lord and Savior. Mrs. Perry was born November 5, 1927 in Hamilton, Canada the eldest daughter of Rev. Alfred Clare and Edna (Jefferson) Motyer. She was preceded in death by a brother and his wife, Derwin (Imogene) Motyer; son, Lee Perry; granddaughter, Emily Perry; brother-in-law, Douglas Ehman. Surviving are her husband, Lyle Perry Jr. whom she married in 1949; children, Lyle III (Ellen) Perry, Lizabeth (Dennis) Boe, Lenn Perry, and Lonn (Ruth) Perry; grandchildren, Jessamine (Dustin) Spulak, Max and Chace Perry, Johannes (Elizabeth) Boe, Nicholas (Desi) Boe and Suzy (Jared) Goulart, Aaron (Rachael) Perry, Joseph Perry, and Nathaniel Perry; great-grandchildren, Kalysta and Jaiden Vorase, Ailie Biddle, Braxton Perry, Ole and Thorren Boe, Dodger Boe, Lilija and Annika Goulart; sister, Shirley Ehman; several cousins, nieces nephews and friends. Mrs. Perry graduated from Howard City H.S. and from Bronson Methodist Hospital School of Nursing in Kalamazoo, Michigan. As a Registered Nurse she practiced her profession at the State Hospital in Kalamazoo and in hospitals in Plainwell, Lakeview, Greenville, and Blodgett Hospital in Grand Rapids, Michigan. She was a member of the Howard City Methodist Church, later attended St. Thomas Lutheran Church in Trufant, Michigan and then became a member of the Cedar Springs United Methodist Church. She was formerly a Brownie Scout Leader, President of the Cedar Springs Women’s Club, and a President of the Cedar Springs H.S. Band Boosters. She regularly attended the alumni reunions of the Howard City H.S. and of Bronson Methodist Hospital School of Nursing. She enjoyed attending meetings of the Cedar Springs City Council, and often contributed comments and opinions during council meetings. She enjoyed her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She took occasional trips to Canada to visit a favorite uncle, Selby Douglas Jefferson and to greet relatives and friends there. Being born in Canada, she had warm feelings toward anything English or British. She became a citizen of the USA in September 1941. The family will greet friends Friday from 6-8 pm at the Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home, Cedar Springs. The service will be Saturday 10:00 a.m. at the United Methodist Church, Cedar Springs. Pastor Steve Lindeman officiating. Interment Reynolds Township Cemetery, Howard City. Memorial contributions may be made to the Cedar Springs United Methodist Church.

Arrangements by Bliss-Witters & Pike Funeral Home

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City to hold City Manager interviews


 

The Cedar Springs City Council met on Monday, June 6, in closed session to choose four more people to interview for the City Manager position. The names were released on Thursday, June 9, after the nominees agreed to be interviewed. However, two of those selected pulled out on Tuesday, June 14.

The interviews will be held at Cedar Springs City Hall on Friday, June 17. There is a possibility that two more candidates will be added to take the place of the ones who pulled out. The ones currently interviewing will be:

12:30 p.m. Michael Womack, Executive Intern, Village of Lake Orion, MI; Graduate Assistant, City of Eastpointe, MI; Attorney, Womack & Womack P.C.

2:00 p.m. Nancy Stoddard, Tax Collector, City of Wyoming, MI

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City Council fires assessor, hires interim City Manager, City clerk resigns


By Judy Reed

The Cedar Springs City Council fired their assessor, hired an interim City Manager, and received the resignation of their City Clerk, all during the course of a special meeting on Thursday evening, May 26.

The Council has been in disagreement with City Assessor Jason Rosenzweig, over six parcels of city-owned property that he says the city should be paying tax on. The Board of Review upheld Rosenzweig’s assessment, and the Council will be appealing it to the state. Michigan property tax appeals can be filed after the March Board of Review and on or before June 30 of the tax year involved.

In Thursday night’s meeting, Rosenzweig spoke to the Council. He told them that the Council has no authority to terminate him because under the City’s charter all employees are placed under the City Manager. He quoted sections from the Charter that say the Council cannot request the employment or dismissal of an employee.

“The Mayor broke the law when he visited me yesterday and asked me to resign,” said Rosenzweig.

He added that he is not a contract employee because he has never received a 1099, and holds office hours. He also noted that under his employment agreement, it states that 30 days notice should be given by either party. He said that he could sue the City for missed wages, and the Council for misconduct in office.

“I am following the law,” he told them. “The state tax commission told me to look closer at the properties. Your own attorney gave me an opinion that I am doing my job,” he said.

Rosenzweig then offered to resign, if the Council agreed to pay his salary for the rest of the year, which he said amounted to about $11,000.

City Council members listened, then went forward with the resolution to fire Rosenzweig.  Mayor Jerry Hall said that their City attorney drafted the resolution and felt they had the authority to dismiss him.

The resolution states that the Council believes the actions of Rosenzweig, in placing certain city-owned properties on the tax roll, were not properly analyzed or communicated to Council, and that according to the city’s charter, the assessor serves at the pleasure of the Council. It also said that under due consideration, the City Council had lost confidence and became dissatisfied in his performance as City assessor, and his termination was effective immediately. It directed the City manager to take action to effectuate the resolution.

The Council decided to leave the hiring of a new assessor up to the new City Manager when hired.

The hiring of an interim City Manager was next on the agenda. They introduced Barbara VanDuren, of Wyoming, who had recently retired from the City of Wyoming as Deputy City Manager, and was previously City Manager in Wayland. “I truly believe in local government, and when the Michigan Municipal League asked if I’d like a shot at being the interim City Manager in Cedar Springs, I said yes,” she told the Council. (See article introducing her on page 3).

Longtime City Clerk Linda Christiansen has been acting City Manager since November. She was visibly upset at the development. “This week is the first time I heard about this,” she told the Council. “I feel very disrespected. I feel like 22 years of my life has gone down the toilet. I will be retiring July 1,” she added, and gave them her letter of resignation.

Christansen had previously said she would stay on until a new City Manager was found.

Members of the Council tried to assure her that they were trying to alleviate the pressure of doing two jobs.

“We were dumbstruck,” said Mayor Jerry Hall. He explained that they had said at last month’s meeting that they wanted to get Christiansen some help. “With the work piling up, and elections coming, we thought maybe it was time to take some pressure off so that she has time to train someone before she leaves,” he explained. “It was not our intent to have her resign. It was to help her, not replace her. If the other manager had taken the job, this wouldn’t be happening. We just thought we needed to get someone in to help her.”

The Council voted 6-1 to hire VanDuren, with Councilmember Perry Hopkins being the lone no vote. He said he had too much respect for Christiansen, and later said that if she couldn’t handle both jobs with the election coming, that should be up to her.

In her resignation letter, Christensen said it had been a privilege to serve as City Clerk. She has worked for five City Managers; along side five treasurers/finance officers; three DPW directors, several fire chiefs; and countless employees, police officers, mayors and city council members. “With all we have shared good times and not so good times; but no  matter what we were going through at the time, we all pulled together working as a team to make Cedar Springs the best it could be under whatever circumstances we were facing,” she wrote.

The Council set another special meeting date of June 6 to review candidates who have applied for the City Manager job. They will review the candidates in closed session and choose the top ones they wish to interview in a public meeting.

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TOP STORY 2015


post photo by J. Reed

post photo by J. Reed

New businesses, non-profits bring revitalization and growth to Cedar Springs

BY JUDY REED

The Cedar Springs area received a shot in the arm this year with several new businesses moving in, and even more growth is on the horizon, thanks to the partnership efforts of the Community Building Development Team with the Cedar Springs Library and Cedar Springs City Council.

The big success story of the year is the Cedar Springs Brewing Company, which finally opened its doors at 95 N. Main, in mid-November. It was the culmination of a 25-year-dream for David Ringler, a.k.a “Director of Happiness” at the brewery, and it’s the first time in recent history that a new building has been built on Main Street in the heart of downtown Cedar Springs.

N-Top-Story-CS-Brew2The brewery/restaurant features a variety of craft beers, focusing on German styles, along with a full food menu (which includes German dishes), wine and their homemade Cedar Creek Sodas, which are non-alcoholic beverages.

Since their opening, the brewery is jam-packed every night and it’s amazing to see so many vehicles in downtown Cedar Springs.

“We’ve had a wonderful reception from the community and been very pleased to welcome many people from outside our community who’ve come to visit, often multiple times,” remarked Ringler. “Some of this is to be expected, given that we’re new and over the holiday season, but we’re hopeful that we’ve made a positive impression and people will continue to visit.”

In the beginning it was difficult to keep up with the demand for beer, but people came anyway.

“We’ve remained very busy, which is a blessing,” said Ringler. “As we’ve progressed over the past six weeks, we’ve been able to adjust our inventories to keep up on beer production, which means we’ll be able to fill growlers soon.”

Ringler talked about some things customers can expect in the coming year. “Our beers will rotate and expand regularly, and our food menu will see the addition of daily specials and be updated at least 3-4 times over the course of the year. We will begin hosting live music regularly and we also have a number of events planned throughout the year (with details coming soon).”

He said they will also begin hosting “Community Giveback Nights,” beginning January 11, where they will be giving back 10 percent of food sales to the Cedar Springs Band Boosters on that evening. Other organizations will follow.

He said they will also begin growler sales, and canning their product for sale in the marketplace, so we will be able to find their beers in stores, bars and other restaurants.

“Our spirits line will also be launched, beginning with Wodka and White Lightning products,” added Ringler. “We will also add additional season sodas and soft drinks to our lineup.”

One of the big things will be the outdoor Biergarten, which will open in the spring, and add 70 to 80 seats.

Ringler is grateful to the community for how they’ve embraced the brewery. “Thank you. We’ve been humbled by the warm reception, encouraged by the enthusiasm, and we’re working hard to earn your continued support,” he said.

The brewery is one of several businesses to come to Cedar Springs this year. The brewery bought the Liquor Hut building, which they then leased to Cold Break Brewing, a home supply brewing company; Family Farm and Home bought the old Family Fare building; and Advance Auto built a new building on the site of the old Family Fare gas station. Since Advance Auto had bought Car Quest previously, they took in all the employees from the Car Quest shop on Main Street.

Another company coming to Cedar Springs is Display Pack, who bought the Wolverine World Wide warehouse at 660 West Street. Wolverine’s lease is up in 2017, and Display Pack is slowly taking over the building as Wolverine vacates the premises. Display Pack, employs 225 people, and up to 275 people seasonally. Since many of their employees live in Grand Rapids and those who walk won’t make the commute, they may hire as many as 60-80 people from this area.

Another group who is revitalizing Cedar Springs is the Community Building Development Team, through their partnership with the Cedar Springs Library and the City of Cedar Springs. Over two dozen organizations and businesses in Cedar Springs, along with dozens of individuals, have been working together for the past three years to develop eight acres of land, within the City limits, into “The Heart of Cedar Springs.” This place can be called our own “Town Square,” where the local citizens and visitors can enjoy a new library building, a community building, a recreation center, and an amphitheater, all placed among beautiful rain gardens and sculptures along a board walk on the banks of Cedar Creek.

Donations of land and cash, as well as pledges, as of November 2015, total over $2,555,000. The overall project is expected to cost approximately $10,000,000.  The plan is to raise funds for each individual project and to break ground for each facility when funds are adequate. Donations may be designated.

The Cedar Springs Library building is scheduled to be built first, breaking ground early next spring. A Capital Campaign Committee was appointed by the CBDT and they are in the process of writing grant proposals to large corporations and foundations to raise the funds needed to complete these projects.

Checks can be written to the Cedar Springs Public Library and either sent to Box 280 or dropped off at the Library. They can also be written to the Community Building Development Team and sent to the treasurer of the CBDT, Betty Truesdale, 141 S Main Street, Cedar Springs, MI 49319.

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Special meeting Thursday night: City of CS and Solon Township


Cedar Springs and Solon Township fighting a fire together in Solon Township in February, 2014.

Cedar Springs and Solon Township fighting a fire together in Solon Township in February, 2014.

By Judy Reed

The Cedar Springs City Council and the Solon Township board will hold a special public meeting on Thursday, December 17, at 7 p.m., at the Solon Township Hall, 15185 Algoma Avenue.

The officials from the two adjoining municipalities are meeting to discuss the findings of the consulting service that did an operational evaluation and shared services study for their two fire departments.

Municipal Consulting Services LLC did the evaluation. They are the same consulting firm that evaluated the Cedar Springs Fire Department in 2009.

The consulting service evaluated each fire department to determine their strengths and weaknesses, and how they can improve. They also evaluated opportunities for the two departments to share resources, including possibly consolidating.

They said that with both communities growing, and already sharing a number of services, such as County dispatch, Rockford ambulance, MABAS automatic aid, the school system, CS Area Parks and Rec, etc., that the fire services should not be segregated between the two communities. They said it could mean full consolidation or something less, such as Solon contracting Cedar Springs to respond to certain areas in Solon Township that lie just outside the Cedar Springs limits.

Other recommendations for shared services include joint master planning by the two fire chiefs (CS Chief Marty Fraser and Solon Chief Jeff Drake); combining some training; joint reviews by command staff of standard operating procedures; grant writing, etc.

The consulting service did not feel that service consolidation would yield a dramatic cost savings, due to the departments being understaffed. But they did say consolidation was feasible, and gave some ideas on what that might look like and what the cost would be.

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City to hold special meeting 


 

The Cedar Springs City Council will hold a special meeting on Thursday, December 3, at 7 p.m. at City Hall, 66 S. Main St, to discuss what attributes the Council desires in a new city manager. The public is also invited to give input.

The City Council will also discuss whether to enter into a contract with the Michigan Municipal League to provide a city manager search. The cost would be $10,000 for them to conduct the search.

City Manager Thad Taylor resigned to take a job as the City Manager in Manistee. Cedar Springs City Clerk Linda Christiansen is currently acting City Manager.

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Red Flannel Festival and City reach agreement


 

By Judy Reed

The Cedar Springs City Council approved an agreement with the Red Flannel Festival Board to donate in kind services during the Festival, as well as an agreement to use any of the Festival’s 14 trademarks in return for the in kind services.

The Council voted in favor of both agreements 5-1, at their regular meeting on Thursday, July 9. Only Councilor Perry Hopkins voted against it. Councilor Bob Truesdale was absent.

“We are grateful this City Council negotiated fairly and in good faith,” said Festival President Michele Tracy. “This reinstates and memorializes the original 69 year handshake agreement, and provides a solid foundation for the long term sustainability of the Festival. We couldn’t be happier for Red Flannel Town, U.S.A.!”

The City voted in August 2012 to stop using the Red Flannel logos and initiate development of their own logo, after an ongoing disagreement over who had the right to use the logos, which the RF Festival had trademarked. The Festival disputed that the city had common law rights to the trademarks, and in August 2012 sent a letter with a notice that they would file for trademark infringement. The Red Flannel Festival had asked for a $4,000 licensing fee for the city to use two of the trademarks, and the city declined, stating that they had used them for 70-plus years. The Council then voted 6-1 to drop the RF logo.

The City removed all Red Flannels from City letterhead, trucks, benches, etc., and eventually created their own logo. However, the members of that City Council are no longer on the Council. The only person left on City Council that was part of that vote was current Mayor Pro Tem Pam Conley, and she was the lone nay vote three years ago.

Conley said, “I have always believed the community wants there to be a supportive working relationship between the City and all of our community groups, especially Red Flannel. I am glad to have had the opportunity to affirm that.”

The Council has not yet voted on if or where they will use any of the Red Flannel logos.

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City Council vetoes donating or selling property to ICCF


 

sw-riconcBy Judy Reed

The Cedar Springs City Council voted down a proposal to donate 174 Pine Street, a city-owned lot, to Inner City Christian Federation, who was hoping to build another affordable home in the community for a family in need.

The ICCF is already building a house at 40 E. Maple, and recently purchased a lot on Cedar Street as well.

ICCF proposed to build a two-story house on the double lot. The lot is assessed at $20,000, and ICCF said that they were willing to purchase it for $10,000. City Manager recommended that they either donate the property to ICCF or sell it for $10,000. John Witmer, who represented ICCF at the meeting, said they had it in the budget, but a donation would be appreciated, and the money would just be put back into a better product.

In a presentation just previous to the ICCF proposal at the meeting, Kurt Mabie, president of the Community Building Development Team, had said he was no longer interested in 174 Pine Street for the CBDT, since they had closed on the Fifth Street property. He did mention, however, that he knew of a builder who might be interested in building senior no-step residences in that area.

Pam Conley asked if someone else was coming before the Council that night with plans for that lot, and Mabie said no.

The City’s master plan calls for senior housing in the mixed use area, and there currently is none. This lot, however, is not in the mixed use area.

Councilor Dan Clark said he wasn’t ready to make a decision, he thought they should look at the master plan. Councilor Perry Hopkins said he was with Dan, that he thought it would be better to gamble and follow through with the master plan of having some senior housing. Councilor Bob Truesdale said his heart was divided. He’d like to see them (ICCF) have it, yet he’d also like to see some senior housing.

Councilor Molly Nixon felt that it would be best to donate it to someone who already had a plan, to get some money back on the property. Taylor said taxes would be about $2,290 and the city would see $900 of that.

In the end, the motion to donate the property was voted down 3 to 4. Voting in favor was Councilors Powell, Conley and Nixon, and against was Councilors Clark, Hall, Hopkins and Truesdale.

You can view the City Council meeting on their website at www.cityofcedarsprings.org.

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Recording of City Council meeting fails


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The Cedar Springs City Council voted last month to purchase the necessary equipment to begin recording all City Council meetings and workshops and putting them on Youtube for the public to view. Last Thursday’s meeting was slated to be the first meeting to be recorded, but it is unavailable for public viewing now or in the future due to technical difficulties, according to City Manager Thad Taylor.

“Our WiFi was not working properly, which led to gaps in the video. Basically we could only make clips from gap to gap, (with) obviously no continuity,” explained Taylor. “Our IT company has a fix for that, and it should be corrected soon.”

He said the biggest issue is that the system only makes video clips up to one hour in duration. “That was never disclosed prior to purchasing, so the system we have doesn’t meet our needs,” said Taylor. “I will take the issue up with the manufacturer.”

City Councilor Rose Powell told the Post she understands it was a mistake, but feels that they should still put up what they have, even if it’s not complete.

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