web analytics

Tag Archive | "breast cancer awareness"

Pink game raises funds for Susan Komen Foundation


 

The Lady Red Hawks Varsity Volleyball team hosted a “Dig Pink” game in honor of breast cancer awareness on Tuesday, October 10. Athletic Director John Norton was happy with the results.

“Congratulations to the whole Cedar Springs Community and the Volleyball Program. After we pay some expenses, it is with great pride we will be making a donation in the amount of $1,591.53 to the Susan G. Komen Foundation of Michigan as a result of our “Pink out” Volleyball event last night,” announced Norton. “Thank you again to everyone who helped make this evening possible, and thank you to everyone who has donated to this great cause. Proud to be a Red Hawk.”

This was the first year that the Volleyball team held the event. Prior to this, it was held by the Varsity football team.

Posted in Featured, SportsComments (0)

WM Hawks battle on breast cancer awareness night


The West Michigan Hawks played for breast cancer awareness last Saturday. Photo by Marcie Crouch.

The West Michigan Hawks played for breast cancer awareness last Saturday.
Photo by Marcie Crouch.

By Shae Brophy

A beautiful evening at Skinner Field on Saturday led to an incredible football game. The Indiana Wolf Pack made their way to town to take on the West Michigan Hawks, in a game that ended in a 22-22 tie.

The Hawks came out swinging to start this one. After forcing a three-and-out on the first Indiana possession of the game, West Michigan quickly marched down the field and scored the first touchdown of the game on a Robert Bell quarterback keeper from two yards out, making the score 7-0, which held up as the score at the end of the first quarter.

The Wolf Pack made some adjustments after that point, and took control of the game. After scoring two touchdowns in the second quarter, Indiana carried a 16-7 lead into halftime.

Taking possession to start the second half, the Hawks fumbled on their first two offensive plays, one of which was returned all the way back to the end zone for an Indiana touchdown. The score was 22-7 in favor of the Wolf Pack early in the third quarter, when the Hawks changed the tide of the game. On the ensuing two point conversion attempt by Indiana, Jalin George picked up a fumble and ran it from one end of the field all the way to the other for two points, making the score 22-9.

Wide receiver John Ross made a tough catch over the middle of the field and ran 47 yards for a touchdown on the next Hawks possession, which made the score 22-15. After forcing a turnover on defense, the Hawks scored again on their next drive after a pass was tipped into the air and grabbed in stride by wide receiver Monta Swanigan. The play was good for an 80-yard touchdown, which tied the game.

After a scoreless fourth quarter, which featured scoring chances for both teams, it was determined that there would be no overtime and the game ended in a tie.

“Nobody likes a tie, especially as we made a huge comeback and had momentum on our side. I thought we fought hard,” said head coach David Lange. “We  faced adversity and overcame. We still have a lot to work on, but we definitely took a step in the right direction. I’d say we are ready for the Kalamazoo Grizzlies.”

Stephanie Cornwell, who was the recipient of the benefit for breast cancer awareness, received an anonymous $1,000 donation as a result of the benefit.

With Memorial Day weekend slated as an off week for the team, the Hawks will be back in action on June 4th at Skinner Field when they welcome the Kalamazoo Grizzlies to town. The benefit for this game will for Alan Beamer, who is battling Alzheimer’s Disease. We hope to see you then!

Posted in Featured, SportsComments (0)

October is breast cancer awareness month


pink-ribbonAmerican Cancer Society recommendations for early breast cancer detection in women without breast symptoms

 

Women age 40 and older should have a mammogram every year and should continue to do so for as long as they are in good health.

Current evidence supporting mammograms is even stronger than in the past. In particular, recent evidence has confirmed that mammograms offer substantial benefit for women in their 40s. Women can feel confident about the benefits associated with regular mammograms for finding cancer early. However, mammograms also have limitations. A mammogram can miss some cancers, and it may lead to follow up of findings that are not cancer.

Mammograms should be continued regardless of a woman’s age, as long as she does not have serious, chronic health problems such as congestive heart failure, end-stage renal disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and moderate to severe dementia. Women with serious health problems or short life expectancies should discuss with their doctors whether to continue having mammograms.

Women in their 20s and 30s should have a clinical breast exam (CBE) as part of a periodic (regular) health exam by a health professional preferably every 3 years. Starting at age 40, women should have a CBE by a health professional every year.

CBE is done along with mammograms and offers a chance for women and their doctor or nurse to discuss changes in their breasts, early detection testing, and factors in the woman’s history that might make her more likely to have breast cancer. The chance of breast cancer occurring is very low for women in their 20s and gradually increases with age. Women should promptly report any new breast symptoms to a health professional.

Breast self-exam (BSE) is an option for women starting in their 20s. Women should report any breast changes to their health professional right away.

Research has shown that BSE plays a small role in finding breast cancer compared with finding a breast lump by chance or simply being aware of what is normal for each woman. Some women feel very comfortable doing BSE regularly (usually monthly after their period) which involves a systematic step-by-step approach to examining the look and feel of one’s breasts. Other women are more comfortable simply feeling their breasts in a less systematic approach, such as while showering or getting dressed or doing an occasional thorough exam.

Sometimes, women are so concerned about “doing it right” that they become stressed over the technique. Doing BSE regularly is one way for women to know how their breasts normally look and feel and to notice any changes. The goal, with or without BSE, is to report any breast changes to a doctor or nurse right away.

If a change occurs, such as development of a lump or swelling, skin irritation or dimpling, nipple pain or retraction (turning inward), redness or scaliness of the nipple or breast skin, or a discharge other than breast milk (such as staining of your sheets or bra), you should see your health care professional as soon as possible for evaluation. Remember that most of the time, however, these breast changes are not cancer.

Women who are at high risk for breast cancer based on certain factors should get an MRI and a mammogram every year.

This includes women who:

Have a lifetime risk of breast cancer of about 20 to 25 percent or greater, according to risk assessment tools that are based mainly on family history (such as the Claus model – see below)

Have a known BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation.

Have a first-degree relative (parent, brother, sister, or child) with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation, and have not had genetic testing themselves.

Had radiation therapy to the chest when they were between the ages of 10 and 30 years.

Have Li-Fraumeni syndrome, Cowden syndrome, or Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, or have first-degree relatives with one of these syndromes.

The American Cancer Society recommends against MRI screening for women whose lifetime risk of breast cancer is less than 15 percent.

There is not enough evidence to make a recommendation for or against yearly MRI screening for women who have a moderately increased risk of breast cancer (a lifetime risk of 15 to 20 percent according to risk assessment tools that are based mainly on family history) or who may be at increased risk of breast cancer based on certain factors, such as:

Having a personal history of breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS), atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), or atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH)

Having dense breasts (“extremely” or “heterogeneously” dense) as seen on a mammogram.

If MRI is used, it should be in addition to, not instead of, a screening mammogram. This is because although an MRI is a more sensitive test (it’s more likely to detect cancer than a mammogram), it may still miss some cancers that a mammogram would detect.

For most women at high risk, screening with MRI and mammograms should begin at age 30 years and continue for as long as a woman is in good health. But because the evidence is limited about the best age at which to start screening, this decision should be based on shared decision-making between patients and their health care providers, taking into account personal circumstances and preferences.

There is no evidence right now that MRI is an effective screening tool for women at average risk. While MRI is more sensitive than mammograms, it also has a higher false-positive rate (it is more likely to find something that turns out not to be cancer). This would lead to unneeded biopsies and other tests in many of the women screened, which can lead to a lot of worry and anxiety.

The American Cancer Society believes the use of mammograms, MRI (in women at high risk), clinical breast exams, and finding and reporting breast changes early, according to the recommendations outlined above, offers women the best chance to reduce their risk of dying from breast cancer. This approach is clearly better than any one exam or test alone.

Without question, a physical exam of the breast without a mammogram would miss the opportunity to detect many breast cancers that are too small for a woman or her doctor to feel but can be seen on mammograms. Mammograms are a sensitive screening method, but a small percentage of breast cancers do not show up on mammograms but can be felt by a woman or her doctors. For women at high risk of breast cancer, such as those with BRCA gene mutations or a strong family history, both MRI and mammogram exams of the breast are recommended.

 

Posted in NewsComments (0)

Simple tips for promoting breast cancer awareness in your own life


Simple tips for promoting breast cancer awareness in your own life
(ARA) – Breast cancer is a prolific disease with an estimated 192,370 new cases diagnosed this year in women and 1,910 new cases diagnosed in men, according to the National Cancer Institute.
This year, National Breast Cancer Awareness Month celebrates 25 years of promoting awareness, education and empowerment.
Since its inception a quarter century ago, NBCAM has grown into a partnership of national public service organizations, professional medical associations and government agencies at the forefront of promoting important breast cancer issues.
In recognition of this 25th anniversary milestone, here are five simple ways to celebrate breast cancer awareness in your own life, courtesy of the NBCAM organization:
Know your risks
The risk of developing breast cancer is not the same for all women. According to the National Cancer Institute age is the single most important risk factor for breast cancer. But research has also shown that personal and family history of breast cancer, alterations in certain genes, reproductive and menstrual history, body weight, level of physical activity and alcohol consumption are among the factors that affect a woman’s risk of developing breast cancer. Talk to your doctor about your risk of developing breast cancer.
Practice healthy habits
While there are some breast cancer risk factors that women cannot avoid – such as age and genetics – there are also steps that women can take to help prevent breast cancer on their own.  Women should know that exposure to tobacco and excessive alcohol consumption are risk factors for breast cancer, as well as other cancers. In addition, research suggests that women can decrease their risk of cancer simply by eating healthy and exercising regularly. Make small changes now to embrace a healthier, more active lifestyle tomorrow. You may want to start by adding a brisk lunch time walk to your day, adding more fruits and vegetables and limiting fat and alcohol in your diet.
Schedule your annual mammogram
Evidence shows that early detection of breast cancer greatly improves a woman’s chance for successful treatment, and scheduling regular mammograms is the most effective way of catching cancer early. The American Cancer Society recommends that all women age 40 and older should have a screening mammogram every year, and should continue to do so for as long as they are in good health. For more information about breast cancer and screenings and to locate a free or low-cost clinic, visit www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast or call (800) CDC-Info.
Know that there is hope
Thanks to early detection and improvements in treatment, more women are surviving breast cancer, remaining disease-free and living longer, healthier lives. Today, nearly 90 percent of women who are diagnosed with breast cancer will survive their disease at least five years, up from just 75 percent 35 years ago, according to the National Cancer Institute. Moreover, the death rate from breast cancer in women has decreased by 2.2 percent annually between 1990 and 2004, according to the American Cancer Society.
Today, there is a flourishing community of 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States, and there is a great deal to be hopeful about.
Educate yourself
Empower yourself by learning as much as possible about breast cancer. While October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the NBCAM organization wants to remind you that breast cancer awareness and education is important all year long.
For more information, visit the www.NBCAM.org Web site, a year-round resource for breast cancer patients, survivors, caregivers, and the general public.
Courtesy of ARAcontent

(ARA) – Breast cancer is a prolific disease with an estimated 192,370 new cases diagnosed this year in women and 1,910 new cases diagnosed in men, according to the National Cancer Institute.

HEA-Breast-cancer-awarenessThis year, National Breast Cancer Awareness Month celebrates 25 years of promoting awareness, education and empowerment.

Since its inception a quarter century ago, NBCAM has grown into a partnership of national public service organizations, professional medical associations and government agencies at the forefront of promoting important breast cancer issues.

In recognition of this 25th anniversary milestone, here are five simple ways to celebrate breast cancer awareness in your own life, courtesy of the NBCAM organization:

Know your risks

The risk of developing breast cancer is not the same for all women. According to the National Cancer Institute age is the single most important risk factor for breast cancer. But research has also shown that personal and family history of breast cancer, alterations in certain genes, reproductive and menstrual history, body weight, level of physical activity and alcohol consumption are among the factors that affect a woman’s risk of developing breast cancer. Talk to your doctor about your risk of developing breast cancer.

Practice healthy habits

While there are some breast cancer risk factors that women cannot avoid – such as age and genetics – there are also steps that women can take to help prevent breast cancer on their own.  Women should know that exposure to tobacco and excessive alcohol consumption are risk factors for breast cancer, as well as other cancers. In addition, research suggests that women can decrease their risk of cancer simply by eating healthy and exercising regularly. Make small changes now to embrace a healthier, more active lifestyle tomorrow. You may want to start by adding a brisk lunch time walk to your day, adding more fruits and vegetables and limiting fat and alcohol in your diet.

Schedule your annual mammogram

Evidence shows that early detection of breast cancer greatly improves a woman’s chance for successful treatment, and scheduling regular mammograms is the most effective way of catching cancer early. The American Cancer Society recommends that all women age 40 and older should have a screening mammogram every year, and should continue to do so for as long as they are in good health. For more information about breast cancer and screenings and to locate a free or low-cost clinic, visit www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast or call (800) CDC-Info.

Know that there is hope

Thanks to early detection and improvements in treatment, more women are surviving breast cancer, remaining disease-free and living longer, healthier lives. Today, nearly 90 percent of women who are diagnosed with breast cancer will survive their disease at least five years, up from just 75 percent 35 years ago, according to the National Cancer Institute. Moreover, the death rate from breast cancer in women has decreased by 2.2 percent annually between 1990 and 2004, according to the American Cancer Society.

Today, there is a flourishing community of 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States, and there is a great deal to be hopeful about.

Educate yourself

Empower yourself by learning as much as possible about breast cancer. While October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the NBCAM organization wants to remind you that breast cancer awareness and education is important all year long.

For more information, visit the www.NBCAM.org Web site, a year-round resource for breast cancer patients, survivors, caregivers, and the general public.

Courtesy of ARAcontent

Posted in NewsComments (0)

Massage and exercise help fight breast cancer in surprising ways


Massage and exercise help fight breast cancer in surprising ways
(NAPS)—Massage and exercise are both popular ways people stay healthy, but this year they are joining forces to help the fight against breast cancer in a nontraditional way.
Massage and Breast Cancer
A growing body of research shows that massage can have serious health benefits for many people—including those battling breast cancer.
In a Mayo Clinic study published in the August 2009 Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, breast cancer patients receiving massage therapy reported a reduction in fatigue, creating a general feeling of wellness and an improvement in sleep quality and their ability to think clearly. A study at the Touch Research Institute showed that levels of “natural killer” cells and lymphocytes that help to battle cancerous tumors increased among breast cancer patients who received a massage three times a week.
Massage therapy can often help alleviate pain and fatigue, which can make a huge difference in the overall feeling of wellness for those overcoming breast cancer, said Judy Stahl, national president of the American Massage Therapy Association® (AMTA). “As a breast cancer survivor myself, I know the difference massage can make when going through such a difficult experience”.
Walk to defeat cancer
Many people walk to keep themselves fit, but this year, thousands across the country are making their steps count for others in the fight to end breast cancer—and enjoying massage as a reward.
The 2009 Breast Cancer 3-Day® is a series of 15 walks nationwide where participants commit to walk 60 miles over the course of three days to raise money to help Susan G. Komen for the Cure® accomplish its promise to end breast cancer forever. And at the end of the long days of walking, participants are treated to complimentary massages courtesy of event presenting sponsor Energizer.
At the Energizer Live it Up! Lounge, walkers can enjoy a free 10-minute chair massage to help them relax and recharge for another day of walking. All massage services are donated by professional members of the AMTA. “By providing massage, we’re not only helping these walkers relax and relieve their tired and aching muscles, but also helping them recharge so they can maintain their spirit throughout their 60-mile journey,” said Stahl.
Tips For A Better Massage
When getting a massage, consider this advice from the AMTA:
1. Communicate with your massage therapist. Give accurate health information and let the therapist know your expectations and reasons for the massage. Tell your massage therapist what you prefer in the way of lotions and oils and whether you have any allergies.
2. Remember to breathe normally. Breathing helps facilitate relaxation.
3. Drink extra water after your massage.
4. Don’t get up too quickly and do allow for some quiet time after your massage session. If you’re dizzy or light-headed after the massage, do not get off the table too fast.
What else you can do
For those interested in supporting the cause, Energizer is currently offering a free, limited-edition Keep Going® Journal, the first in a series, which benefits Susan G. Komen for the Cure®. The collectible 80-page journal features inspirational quotes, a calendar and a pink ribbon bookmark. It’s available by mailing in three proofs of purchase from select Energizer products. For every journal redeemed, Energizer will donate $1.00 to Susan G. Komen for the Cure® up to $15,000, with a minimum guaranteed donation of $10,000.
Learn More
For more information, visit www.energizer.com/komen or www.the3day.org. For information about breast health or breast cancer, visit www.komen.org or call 1-877-GO-KOMEN.
Massages help recharge walkers.

Massages help recharge walkers.

(NAPS)—Massage and exercise are both popular ways people stay healthy, but this year they are joining forces to help the fight against breast cancer in a nontraditional way.

Massage and Breast Cancer

A growing body of research shows that massage can have serious health benefits for many people—including those battling breast cancer.

In a Mayo Clinic study published in the August 2009 Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, breast cancer patients receiving massage therapy reported a reduction in fatigue, creating a general feeling of wellness and an improvement in sleep quality and their ability to think clearly. A study at the Touch Research Institute showed that levels of “natural killer” cells and lymphocytes that help to battle cancerous tumors increased among breast cancer patients who received a massage three times a week.

Massage therapy can often help alleviate pain and fatigue, which can make a huge difference in the overall feeling of wellness for those overcoming breast cancer, said Judy Stahl, national president of the American Massage Therapy Association® (AMTA). “As a breast cancer survivor myself, I know the difference massage can make when going through such a difficult experience”.

Walk to defeat cancer

Many people walk to keep themselves fit, but this year, thousands across the country are making their steps count for others in the fight to end breast cancer—and enjoying massage as a reward.

The 2009 Breast Cancer 3-Day® is a series of 15 walks nationwide where participants commit to walk 60 miles over the course of three days to raise money to help Susan G. Komen for the Cure® accomplish its promise to end breast cancer forever. And at the end of the long days of walking, participants are treated to complimentary massages courtesy of event presenting sponsor Energizer.

At the Energizer Live it Up! Lounge, walkers can enjoy a free 10-minute chair massage to help them relax and recharge for another day of walking. All massage services are donated by professional members of the AMTA. “By providing massage, we’re not only helping these walkers relax and relieve their tired and aching muscles, but also helping them recharge so they can maintain their spirit throughout their 60-mile journey,” said Stahl.

Tips For A Better Massage

When getting a massage, consider this advice from the AMTA:

1. Communicate with your massage therapist. Give accurate health information and let the therapist know your expectations and reasons for the massage. Tell your massage therapist what you prefer in the way of lotions and oils and whether you have any allergies.

2. Remember to breathe normally. Breathing helps facilitate relaxation.

3. Drink extra water after your massage.

4. Don’t get up too quickly and do allow for some quiet time after your massage session. If you’re dizzy or light-headed after the massage, do not get off the table too fast.

What else you can do

For those interested in supporting the cause, Energizer is currently offering a free, limited-edition Keep Going® Journal, the first in a series, which benefits Susan G. Komen for the Cure®. The collectible 80-page journal features inspirational quotes, a calendar and a pink ribbon bookmark. It’s available by mailing in three proofs of purchase from select Energizer products. For every journal redeemed, Energizer will donate $1.00 to Susan G. Komen for the Cure® up to $15,000, with a minimum guaranteed donation of $10,000.

Learn More

For more information, visit www.energizer.com/komen or www.the3day.org. For information about breast health or breast cancer, visit www.komen.org or call 1-877-GO-KOMEN.

Posted in NewsComments (0)


advert
Advertising Rates Brochure
Cedar Car Co
Kent Theatre
Ensley Team Five Star Realty

Get the Cedar Springs Post in your mailbox for only $35.00 a year!