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Tag Archive | "Army National Guard"

Helpful tips to protect your hearing


Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

(Family Features)

Not only can noise distract, disturb and interfere with communication and sleep, it can affect your performance, behavior and hearing.

In many cases, hearing loss can be prevented by recognizing sources of damaging noise levels and using appropriate protective equipment. However, excessive noise exposure can cause permanent hearing loss that cannot be treated with medication, or result in constant ringing in your ears called tinnitus. Impaired hearing can reduce your ability to recognize your surroundings and listen for cues of potential danger.

HEA-Hearing2Learn how to protect yourself from future hearing damage with this advice from Guard Your Health, a health education campaign by the Army National Guard:

  • Know the safe volume limit to protect yourself from future hearing damage. Noise that is 0 to 80 decibels is generally safe, while noise that is 140 to 200 decibels can be dangerous.
  • Noise that exceeds safe parameters, even if it’s under 140 decibels, can still cause damage to your hearing over time. A general rule of thumb is the “three feet rule.” If you have to shout to someone who is three feet away (about an arm’s length), the noise level in that location could be damaging.
  • Be aware that a single exposure to a very loud sound (such as weapon fire) can cause permanent hearing loss.
  • Using proper hearing protection for the environment can help prevent damage to your eardrum and hearing. There are several types of hearing protection devices available including foam earplugs, silicone earplugs and earmuffs. For example, when shooting at the gun range, noise-activated earplugs can help you avoid sudden eardrum rupture.
  • Foam earplugs should be pinched when inserted, allowing the foam to expand in your ear until you achieve a tight, non-painful seal. Silicone earplugs should be inserted only until you feel a slight resistance to avoid damaging your inner ear. To wear ear plugs properly, straighten your ear by gripping the cartilage and stretching it away from your body. Insert the earplug then release your ear. Do a few jumping jacks to test the security of the earplugs; if they fall out, try again or get a smaller size.
  • Earmuffs should rest about two finger widths from your jawbone and completely cover your ears for a tight seal on the side of your face.

If you notice signs of hearing problems, ask your doctor to test your hearing. Common symptoms include a muffled sound in your ears after leaving a noisy area or event such as a car race, concert, wood working or hunting; prolonged ringing or buzzing in your ears after exposure to noise; and difficulty understanding what people are saying although you can hear them talking.

For more health-related tools and information, visit guardyourhealth.com.

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Hometown Hero


Army National Guard Spec. Melissa Renucci has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C.

During the nine weeks of training, the soldier studied the Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical fitness, and received instruction and practice in basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training, drill and ceremony, marching, rifle marksmanship, armed and unarmed combat, map reading, field tactics, military courtesy, military justice system, basic first aid, foot marches, and field training exercises.

Renucci is the daughter of Brenda Harrington of Cedar Springs, Mich., and sister of Cindy Overholser of Hermitage, Tenn.

She is a 1995 graduate of Lee High School, Grand Rapids, Mich.

 

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Hometown Hero


 

Army National Guard Spec. Nicholas S. Emery has graduated from basic infantry training at Fort Benning, Columbus, Ga.

During the nine weeks of training, the soldier received training in drill and ceremonies, weapons, map reading, tactics, military courtesy, military justice, physical fitness, first aid, and Army history, core values and traditions. Additional training included development of basic combat skills and battlefield operations and tactics, and experiencing use of various weapons and weapons defenses available to the infantry crewman.

Emery is the son of Allen and Cathleen Emery of Cedar Springs, and husband of Pamella.

The specialist is a 2001 graduate of Cedar Springs High School. He earned a bachelor’s degree in 2008 from Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids.

 

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Hometown Hero


David Lange, a 2007 Cedar Springs graduate, will be leaving for Afghanistan at the end of March, for a 9-month tour of duty.

Specialist Lange joined the Army National Guard, while still in high school, in 2007. In Dec. 2009, he went on active duty and was assigned as a Cavalry Scout to Ft. Carson, Colorado. Three months later, his unit was deployed to the Basrah region of Iraq, and returned last March. He recently received additional training at Ft. Polk, Louisiana, in preparation for his Afghanistan deployment.

David will be home on leave from March 8-16, and then return to Ft. Carson to ship out. While in Afghanistan, he hopes to meet up with his best friend, Jeremy Laatz, also a 2007 CS graduate, who was deployed earlier this year.

David is the son of Dave and Cyndy Lange of Cedar Springs.

 

 

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Hometown hero


Nathan A. Hoskins

Army National Guard Pvt. Nathan A. Hoskins has graduated from the Direct Fire Infantryman One Station Unit Training at Fort Benning, Columbus, Ga.
The training consists of Basic Combat Training and Advanced Individual Training.
During the nine weeks of Basic Combat Training, the soldier received training in drill and ceremonies, weapons, map reading, tactics, military courtesy, military justice, physical fitness, first aid, and Army history, core values and traditions. Additional training included development of basic combat skills and battlefield operations and tactics, and experiencing use of various weapons and weapons defenses available to the infantry crewman.
The Advanced Individual Training course is designed to train indirect fire infantry soldiers to employ, fire and recover anti-personnel and anti-tank mines; locate, neutralize and extract mines; map reading and ground navigation; operate and maintain communications equipment and radio networks; construct and camouflage mortar firing positions; operate and maintain mortars and fire control equipment for individual/crew served weapons firing positions.
Hoskins is the son of Mark and Joy Hoskins of 19 Mile Road, Cedar Springs, Mich.
He is a 2010 graduate of Cedar Springs High School.

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