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Tag Archive | "4H"

Founders Day celebration this weekend


Music is back for this year’s Founders Day, along with several other events.

Music is back for this year’s Founders Day, along with several other events.

Put on your long underwear and head out to the second annual Founders Day weekend, Friday and Saturday, March 28 and 29. The Cedar Springs Area Chamber of Commerce invites young and old alike to come out and help celebrate this special event.

The event kicks off Friday with a new addition—a children’s street fair from 4-7 p.m. at the heated tent on the corner of Main and Ash Street. There will be music, a balloon man, face painting, storytelling, and a ventriloquist/magician. There will also be carnival games and other events going on during the entire three hours such as ring toss, beanbag toss, duck pond, bucket bonanza, crafts, a log cabin to play in, a real lumberjack, model trains, wooden train sets, and a petting zoo courtesy of Double K Farms and 4H.

Saturday has more in store. The Cedar Springs Public Library will host pioneer crafts and storytelling from 10 to 1 p.m. at the Library. The Cedar Springs Historical Museum will be open from 11 to 3 p.m., and host several different presentations at the museum as well.The Saturday evening free concert is back at the Ash Street tent from 4-10 p.m. and all ages are welcome. This year’s concert features the bands Signal Trip and the Youz Guys Band. Food will be available to purchase from The Grilling Company and will feature pulled pork, brisket, and sides. Beer (including a local craft beer) and hard ciders will also be available to purchase. See ad on page 5 for details.

 

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Founders Day celebration next weekend


Music is back for this year’s Founders Day, along with several other events. Post photo by J. Reed.

Music is back for this year’s Founders Day, along with several other events. Post photo by J. Reed.

March 28-29

Cedar Springs was officially recognized as a village 143 years ago, on March 18, 1871. And that’s something worth celebrating.

The Cedar Springs Area Chamber of Commerce invites young and old alike to come out and help celebrate that special event with the second annual Founder’s Day weekend, March 28-29. There will be something for everyone!

The event kicks off Friday with a new addition—a children’s street fair from 4-7 p.m. at the tent on the corner of Main and Ash Streets. From 4 to 5:30 p.m. there will be music, a balloon man, and face painting; from 5:30 to 5:45 will be storytelling by Post editor Judy Reed; from 6 to 6:30 ventriloquist/magician Charles Mabie will entertain the kids. There will also be carnival games and other events going on during the entire three hours such as ring toss, beanbag toss, duck pond, bucket bonanza, crafts, a log cabin to play in, a real lumberjack, model trains, wooden train sets, and a petting zoo courtesy of Double K Farms and 4H.

Saturday has more in store. The Cedar Springs Public Library will host pioneer crafts and storytelling from 10 to 1 p.m. at the Library. The Cedar Springs Historical Museum will be open from 11 to 3 p.m., and host several different presentations at the museum as well.

392828_614001431948730_1727882393_nThe Saturday evening free concert is back at the Ash Street tent from 4-10 p.m. and all ages are welcome. This year’s concert features the bands Signal Trip and the Youz Guyz Band. Food will be available to purchase from The Grilling Company and will feature pulled pork, brisket, and sides. Beer (including a local craft beer) and hard ciders will also be available to purchase.

Chamber president Shawn Kiphart said that they called the future Cedar Springs Brewing Company first (a business coming to the area in the future) to see if they would be available to supply the beer, but they are not yet ready. “We look forward to using them at a future event,” he noted.

For questions about the event, call Kiphart at (616) 773-5126.

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No Child Left Inside Part 1


OUT-RangerSteveMuellerBy Ranger Steve Mueller

 

No child left inside is locally important for all things start at home. I emphasize what people can do to promote healthy nature niches on their property for families and wildlife. Our children are among those that live in our home nature niches.

An organized No Child Left Inside movement has been around for over a century in many forms by different names and sponsors. Field and Stream Clubs across the country have programs where youth get immersed in the outdoors. The emphasis focuses around hunting and fishing with a goal to help youth understand the natural world they depend on for life. They gave me a scholarship to wildlife camp for a week in 1964 where I learned about birds, mammals, fish, outdoor skills, and habitat management.

The National Audubon Society Junior Audubon program takes kids outdoors to experience birds, plants, insects, and all ecology our lives depend upon. The local Junior Audubon is the longest running program in North America according to Grand Rapids Audubon leader Wendy Tatar. My parents subscribed me to Junior Audubon booklets monthly for years that taught about soil, worms, insects, birds, mammals, amphibians, plant communities and the list goes on and on.

4H programs focus primarily on animal husbandry and plant propagation for making ones livelihood but it leads to understanding how all nature’s creatures like soil bacteria and mycorhiza fungus are essential for maintaining a healthy world. Paige Gebhardt, 4H student, graduated salutatorian this year from Cedar Springs High School and will attend Michigan State University studying wildlife programs. She told me this spring she would love to work with wolves and become a wildlife biologist to enhance healthy nature niches essential for the health of our community.

Boy and Girl Scout programs have been among the most influential for my personal development. Boy Scouts got me outside canoeing, camping, hiking, observing with focused activities where I could study the natural world. The leaders often did not have the best nature knowledge but they loved it. By the time I was in high school, scout leaders and other scouts often turned to me with nature questions because I immersed myself in outdoor study. The first nature book I bought with my own money was A Field to the Butterflies, by Alexander Klots. I had been chasing winged jewels for years and wanted better understanding.

The Michigan Alliance for Environmental and Outdoor Education (MAEOE) is an organization of outdoor leaders and teachers focused on experiential outdoor recreational activities and for responsible environmental stewardship that is not environmentally destructive. I was president of MAEOE working to lead local communities in Michigan to help return environmental and outdoor education as a priority again in 2007. In 1986, Dale Elshoff and I both moved to Michigan and we were already trained Project WILD facilitators. Together we led the first statewide teacher training in Project WILD to establish it in Michigan. It is a form of no child left inside that teachers and organization leaders use with youth.

It was the beginning of June 2005 when I was called to the Kent ISD office and told to lay off the staff at the Howard Christensen Nature Center on the last day of school. The superintendent told me they were closing HCNC because environmental education was no longer a priority in America. I objected and he commented that he was not saying it was not important but it was no longer a priority in America, Michigan, or our community. There were several people throughout the county that contacted the ISD and even the Grand Rapids Press but environmental education had become a political football instead of a community value so it was closed. The Kent County Soil Conservation District reopened it a year later for two years and then a nonprofit organization called Lily’s Frog Pad assumed management. Their programs and community involvement are growing at HCNC to promote No Child Left Inside.

Next week’s nature niche will focus on the current No Child Left Inside movement.

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at the odybrook@chartermi.net or Ody Brook, 13010 Northland Dr, Cedar Springs, MI 49319-8433.

 

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