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Archive | Voices and Views

Congratulations to the new mayor

Congratulations to our new Mayor, Mark Fankhauser, for winning the mayor’s seat, and a big thank you to that person who spilled the beans several days before election night that I would not be returned to serve you, the good people of Cedar Springs. I have been asked not to write and inform you any longer. I will honor that request, but let me tell you before I go, our City is not broke, and the $2,930 in fees invoiced to the Red Flannel Festival for 2013, is not the big picture.

I have a copy of those “severe” cuts that were made a few years ago when our revenues dried up. One of them was using two-ply rather than four-ply toilet tissue at City Hall. You poor people, it made me want to cry. When I was a kid growing up on West Muskegon Street, we had the luxury of going from corn cobs to the pages from a Sears and Roebuck Catalog. Those were the good days, as my Grandpa Eldred was also a successful businessman.

Thank you for your prayers and support. 

See you, Bob Truesdale

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From the Mayor’s Desk

By Bob Truesdale

 

Yesterday, on my way to church, we drove past a home on 5th Street, where a family was parking their second car on the grass, just off their single gravel driveway, leading to a one-stall garage. It has been that way since I was a kid.

But, it brought to memory, a former city manager, who rode with a uniformed police officer, in a marked police car, targeting these families, who were violating some type of a city code—families who were already struggling in our poor economy. We can only hope and pray these Gestapo tactics are now behind us.

I heard a present member of our planning commission say, “I liked it the way it was in the past,” which I took to mean he felt we had too many codes and it was not our business to regulate everything people do.

I agree with you. 2014 can be a year of healing. As for me, I can never have too many friends, as we move forward. Please join us at 7 p.m. tonight (Thursday) for our annual City Council meeting at City Hall. Some exciting projects are being proposed.

Humbly, your friend,

 the mayor

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Let’s serve Veterans as well as they have served us

Daniel M. Dellinger

Daniel M. Dellinger

By Daniel M. Dellinger

 

During the recent government shutdown many numbers were thrown around. But there is one number that stands out and it has nothing to do with the debate over the federal budget.

More than one a day. That is how many members of our active-duty military, National Guard and Reserve forces have committed suicide over the last year. Simply put, we are losing more service members by their own hands than we are by the enemy in Afghanistan. Only those who experienced firsthand the horrors of combat can understand why most of these young men and women feel compelled to take such drastic and permanent measures.

As Veterans Day ceremonies and parades occur throughout the country, it is important that we commit ourselves to do everything possible to prevent these needless and tragic deaths. We are their friends, their family, their co-workers and their neighbors. It is up to us to ensure that every veteran feels that his or her service to this country is appreciated by their fellow Americans.

There are many tangible ways that we can acknowledge their sacrifice, but the easiest is to simply say, “Thank you for what you have done for our country.”

If he is showing signs of unhappiness or depression, encourage him to seek help through the VA immediately. If she has had difficulty obtaining the benefits that she is entitled to let her know that The American Legion has thousands of trained service officers nationwide that will help her navigate the bureaucracy free of charge.

And if that veteran has made the Supreme Sacrifice, remember the price that has been paid for our freedom and offer your support to the loved ones left behind.

But Veterans Day is a time to honor not just those who have fought for us in battle, but, in fact, all of the outstanding men and women who served in our nation’s Armed Forces since our founding more than 237 years ago.

Not all veterans have seen war, but a common bond that they share is an oath in which they expressed their willingness to die defending this nation.

Perhaps most significant in preserving our way of life are the battles that America does not have to fight because those who wish us harm slink away in fear of the Navy aircraft carrier, the Coast Guard cutter, the Air Force fighter squadron or the Army soldier on patrol. While we should all be grateful for the remarkable advancements made in military medicine and prosthetics, the fighting spirit and inspirational stories of our veterans are not due to technology.

These traits come from the heart.

And many of these veterans are women, such as Army Chief Warrant Officer Lori Hill. While piloting her helicopter over Iraq in 2006, she maneuvered her chopper to draw enemy gunfire away from another helicopter and provide suppressive fire for troops on the ground. Despite flying a damaged aircraft and suffering injuries, she landed the helicopter safely, saving her crew. For her actions, she became the first woman to receive the Distinguished Flying Cross.

Women are major contributors to our military presence in Afghanistan and many have given their lives in the War on Terrorism. The American Legion recently issued a report calling upon VA to improve its response to the unique needs of women veterans. The VA and military health systems need to adequately treat breast and cervical cancer as well as trauma that resulted from domestic violence, sexual harassment and assault. America is home to more than 1.2 million women veterans and they deserve our support.

In the poem “Tommy,” the great writer Rudyard Kipling lamented over the rude treatment a British soldier received at a pub. Writing in classical old English, Kipling compared the abuse with the more favorable treatment that “Tommy” receives by the public during war.

“For it’s Tommy this, an ‘ Tommy that, an’ ‘Chuck him out, the brute!’

But it’s ‘Savior of ‘is country’ when the guns begin to shoot;

An’ it’s Tommy this, an’ Tommy that, an’ anything you please;

An’ Tommy ain’t a bloomin’ fool – you bet that Tommy sees!”

Let us always treat our 23 million veterans as the saviors of our country that they are—even when the guns are no longer shooting.

 

Daniel M. Dellinger is national commander of the 2.4 million member American Legion.

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From the Mayor’s Desk

Mayor Bob Truesdale

Mayor Bob Truesdale

By Bob Truesdale

 

Wow! Election Day was exciting. I saw many of our older citizens hobble in and out of City Hall to vote. They remember the good old days when our city was a thriving community.

A big thank you to everyone that put forth the effort to vote the new faces to city council. It was a tough call, but you made it happen.

Congratulations to Daniel Clark and Jerry Hall. I look forward to working with each of you in years to come.

And to Pam Conley and Mark Laws, you fought a good fight, and don’t give up. Our city needs someone like you to form a “Concerned Citizens Coalition,” with a representative of the group at every planning and council meeting. If you, the taxpayers of our city will get involved, I promise you an all new Cedar Springs in 2014. With God’s help, watch us make the changes you have been asking for.

 

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From the Mayor’s Desk

Mayor Bob Truesdale

Mayor Bob Truesdale

By Bob Truesdale, Mayor

The City of Cedar Springs

 

First, my condolences to the Mike and Alice Holton family. You should be mighty proud to be the children and kin of such a caring couple. Cedar Springs and Red Flannels was a great part of their lives, and they showed it in so many ways that can’t be named or counted. Thank you, Mike and Alice, so very much for your love and example to we that remain.

In June of this year, I asked my wife to send an email to my fellow council members that started with the statement, “Depending on your support, I might become known in the future, as the Mayor who served the shortest term in office, for delving into the problems John and Mary Taxpayer experience. I asked for their support and it backfired, with my getting called on the carpet for editorials in the Post.

As kids in Sunday School we sang, “Dare to be a Daniel, Dare to stand alone, Dare to have a purpose firm, Dare to make it known.” Daring to be a Daniel is not always easy, but I stand by the statements I made; length of time served as your Mayor means nothing to me. If it turns out to be only a one-year tenure, so be it. You won’t find me crying, for in God’s sight, I have given it my very best, with the abilities He gave me.

My promise to you: I will continue to serve with a good attitude, in any capacity, for an all-new Cedar Springs in 2014.

Thanks for your prayers and support,

Your friend and present Mayor

 

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From the Mayor’s Desk

Mayor Bob Truesdale

Mayor Bob Truesdale

By Bob Truesdale, Mayor

The City of Cedar Springs

 

In Florida, 78 degrees, taking a few days off before our November 5 big election (in Cedar Springs).  I’m sitting on the veranda of a mini $1.5 million southern plantation that most of us only dream about. My granddaughter and her husband own and operate a lucrative photography studio site. They are a very organized young couple, living what this generation calls the good life. Oh, and did I mention, they run it like a business?

I am thinking that maybe you, the local taxpayers, should check with my counterparts on our city council and some very sensible first-time candidates, as to where they stand on our city being operated in a more business-like setting, and also not doing a thumbs-down on the Community Building Development team’s proposed plans to relocate the fire barn, so we can enjoy a beautiful new library and community building overlooking a multi-colored flowing well. I would ask you to please take a look at what other villages and townships have done all around us, over the past few years. They are called visionaries. We also have leadership with a passion to give of their resources, abilities, and their time to make it happen in our community, for our present and future generations.

Please get out November 5 and vote your God-given wisdom. If you need a ride to and from the poles, phone 696-2050. There are cars and drivers standing by, ready to get you there.

God bless you, I am humbly, 

Your Mayor

 

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How to improve the road ahead

V-Lee-HamiltonBy Lee H. Hamilton

 

One of the more amazing spectacles in the days after the government shutdown ended was the obsession in Washington with who won and who lost in the showdown. Yes, the capital is focused on next year’s elections, but honestly! There was only one real loser, and that was the American people.
Why? Because nothing got resolved. The agreement leaves the government open only until mid-January, and gives the Treasury the ability to borrow through early February. This is the barest minimum that we needed. So the question is, can we avoid a similar crisis down the road? To do so, Congress must confront three enormous challenges. To begin with, great democracies do not lurch from doomsday moment to doomsday moment. They plan ahead, they resolve their challenges, they fulfill their responsibilities abroad and respond to their own people’s needs. Congress can do none of these things so long as its members respond only to brinksmanship, resolving one crisis by setting up another a few months down the road.

Second, I find myself thinking often these days of the skillful legislators I’ve known over the years. Where are their counterparts today? Congress only works well when politicians and staff understand that each party has to walk away with something; that it’s crucial to preserve flexibility and avoid scorched-earth rhetoric; and that it takes people with the fortitude not to walk away from talks when things are going poorly. Congress needs legislators who are willing to roll up their sleeves and commit fully to the process.

Finally, Congress is weak today. By its inaction, it has given power to the President, who can use executive actions to enact policy. It has strengthened the federal bureaucracy by leaving regulatory decisions to federal agencies with very little direction or oversight. It has given massive economic power to the Federal Reserve, since someone has to promote economic growth. And it has allowed the Supreme Court to become the central policy-making body on controversial issues from campaign finance to affirmative action to environmental regulation.

“Any society that relies on nine unelected judges to resolve the most serious issues of the day is not a functioning democracy,” Justice Anthony Kennedy said in a recent speech. I’m sorry to say that he’s talking about us.

Lee Hamilton is Director of the Center on Congress at Indiana University. He was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for 34 years.

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Scholarship pageant

Dear Post people,

Just read through all of your paper dated October 3, 2013. Coverage of the crowning of the Queen and her court, very nice. I also saw pictures of athletes of the month, very nice also. What I didn’t see was a picture of a little lady by the name of Tamara Tiethoff that was voted by the other ladies on the scholarship pageant for “Miss Congeniality.” Would really have been nice to see her name even mentioned.

A Post Reader,

Wm Boehm

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From your Mayor’s Desk

By Bob Truesdale, Mayor

Cedar Springs City Council

 

Long time no see. I mean, long time no say. At least one person on City Council seems to feel that I am elevating myself above other councilpersons, in attempting to keep you, the good people, apprised of the good things that are coming your way.

Nothing could be further from the truth. Many of you older people know me as
Bobby Truesdale, a little boy born into a single parent home on the other side of the railroad tracks in Cedar Springs. And, having a dad who ran off on me, for that so-called other woman, before I was born. I too, bore the stigma, like many children of our day. When we made Father’s day gifts in grade school, I soon learned I was a nobody. That followed me for years.

Then I came to realize that God wants all of us to be a humble somebody, and I take great joy in telling you that there are many great area somebodies that are stepping forward to build an all new Cedar Springs in 2014. Everyone has something to contribute, and if this is something you would like to help with, and have a good attitude, please join us now, and don’t forget to vote on November 5. This election can turn the tide, and you the people will have a say in what happens at City Hall.

Humbly, your Mayor

Bob Truesdale

 

This and future writings from your Mayor’s desk does not reflect the feelings of all city councilors.

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Even the Mayor goes to jail

 

 

Yes, he ignorantly drove his 4-wheeler down Main Street, not realizing it needed to be tagged by the Red Flannel Festival for insurance purposes. After a conversation with the Chief of Police, Roger Parent, it was decided by the Keystone Cops—Leon Avery and Mark Fankhauser—that I was not above the long arm of the law! A big thanks to Russ Durst for bailing me out. And thanks to RFF President Michele Andres for legalizing my vehicle. Maybe, with everyone’s help, I can play within the rules at next year’s 75th Red Flannel Festival.

It was a great day for everyone, a sea of red up and down Main Street, including an Amish Furniture store on South Main Street that had record sales. And some would say that it (the day) is about the RFF and their so-called financial empire, and that the city merchants don’t benefit that much. Last Saturday’s sales was an eye-opener for this merchant.

A world of thanks to all the worker bees, generous sponsors and donors for a great Red Flannel Festival.

 

Humbly,

Your mayor, Bob Truesdale

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