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Archive | Seasonal

Halloween Happenings

Halloween-leadin

Check out some of the fun, fall activities going on in our area for Halloween!

 

MCC Haunted Indoor Forest

Oct. 24, 25: Montcalm Community College Art Club hosts a Haunted Indoor Forest from 6-8 p.m. on Friday, October 24 and Saturday, October 25 from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Instruction North Building, on the college’s Sidney campus. A $2 donation is suggested.

Harvest Brains at Sand Lake/Nelson Library

Oct. 25: Program for teens, at 1:30 p.m., Saturday, October 25. Save your brains! Build a survival bag, practice your aim, and learn what it takes to stay alive during a zombie apocalypse. The library is located at 88 Eighth St., Sand Lake.

Harvest party

Oct. 25: Cedar Creek Community Church, at 2969 14 Mile RD NE Sparta, will host a harvest party on Saturday, October 25, from 5-8 p.m. There will be hayrides (using straw due to allergies), pumpkin painting, dunking for apples, cake walk, games, face painting, soup, hot dogs, popcorn, and lots of fun! All are welcome. Call 866-9829 for more info.

Pumpkin Carving and Lit Trails Walk

Oct. 25: Pumpkin/Carving and Pumpkin lit trail hike from 5-8:30 p.m. at Howard Christensen Nature Center, 16290 Red Pine Dr., Kent City, on Saturday, October 25. Suggested donation is $8 per person or $30 for family of four or more, including pumpkin to take home. (No one turned away for inability to pay. This donation helps keep HCNC operating.) Pumpkin carving from 5 to 6:30 p.m. and pumpkin lit walk through our spooky Enchanted Forest from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. (Friendly enough for your toddlers. Non scary animals will be on display in the forest, weather permitting for the mock-animals). Includes pumpkin to take home or leave at the center for the wild animals to munch on. Dress up as your favorite nature character. Open to all ages.

Trunk ‘r Treat at Courtland-Oakfield UMC 

Oct. 25: It’s our fourth annual Trunk ‘r Treat for kids of all ages. Saturday, October 25, 5:30-7:00 p.m. at Courtland-Oakfield United Methodist Church, 10295 Myers Lake NE. Candy outdoors; hot dogs & baked beans indoors.

Trunk or Treat at East Nelson UMC

Oct. 25: Bring your kids and come “Trunk or Treat” at East Nelson UM Church, 9024 18 Mile Rd., Cedar Springs on Saturday, October 25 from 5-7 p.m. Warm up with hot chocolate and sloppy joes. Games and fun for all.

Fall Festival  

Oct. 29: Fall Festival for all ages at the Solon Center Wesleyan Church, 15671 Algoma Ave., Cedar Springs on Wednesday, October 29, from 6:30- 8 p.m. For families with children 5th grade and under. Games, prizes, snacks, boy and girl door prizes and candy, candy, candy! The church is located on Algoma, just north of 19 Mile Road.

Nightmare on Cherry Street

Oct. 30: Calling all 4th to 6th graders!  You are officially invited to come to our “Nightmare on Cherry Street” party at the Cedar Springs Library! The fun, games, and food will begin at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, October 30 and go until 7:30. Registration is required, so come into the library to sign up or call 616-696-1910

Trick or Treat Trail Walk

Oct. 31: From 3-5 p.m. on Halloween, bring your kiddos by Howard Christensen Nature Center, 16290 Red Pine Dr., Kent City, to take a short walk down one of our trails to collect some candy, so we don’t get tricked!

Cedar Springs Spooktacular

Oct. 31:  The Cedar Springs Area Chamber of Commerce, businesses and churches in Cedar Springs are sponsoring the annual Main Street Halloween Spooktacular on Friday, October 31. Some of the free events include: spooky storytelling and crafts at the Cedar Springs Public Library, 4:30 p.m.; a haunted school house at the Cedar Springs Historical Museum in Morley Park 5-7 p.m.; a Kids Carnival, hosted by Calvary Assembly of God 5-7 p.m.; Trick-or-Treating at local businesses between 5-7pm; and Trunk or Treat at The Springs Church from 6 to 8 p.m. (see more details below).

Kids carnival

Oct. 31: Calvary Assembly of God will be presenting a free carnival during the Chamber of Commerce’s Spooktacular event from 5-7pm on Friday, October 31. The carnival will be at the corner of Ash and Main Street, next to DJ Nails, and will have lots of family-friendy games, with prizes and candy.

Haunted school house

Oct. 31: The Haunted School House is back this year at the Cedar Springs Historical Museum in Morley Park from 5-7 p.m. again. Nolan Patin has worked up another fun spooky event for the museum. We do adapt our spookiness when young children are coming through and will be handing out treats.

Trunk or Treat at The Springs

Oct. 31: Creative costumes—check. Oodles of goodies—check. Lots of giggles and loads of fun—doublecheck! You’ll experience it all at The Springs Church at Trunk or Treat on Halloween night from 6 to 8 p.m. There will be lots of candy for the taking, carnival games, a giant slide, and refreshments. It will be fun for the whole family, and a safe, well-lit environment for kids. The church is located at 135 N. Grant St., in Cedar Springs.

Traffic Squad/Fire Department

Oct. 31: There will be cider, donuts and candy at the Cedar Springs Fire Department on Maple Street from 5 to 7 p.m. or while supplies last.

Halloween Hospitality Center

Oct. 31: Warm up station at the Cedar Springs United Methodist Church, 140 S. Main Street, Cedar Springs, on Friday, October 31, from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Serving hot chocolate and popcorn, everyone is welcome to join us.

Halloween party – Courtland Fire

Oct 31:  Stop by the Halloween party at the Courtland Fire station #2, 9535 Myers Lake road from 5-9 p.m. Games, snacks candy, cider, coffee,  car trunks with treats welcome. Sponsored by women auxiliary, and many stores in the area.

Family Harvest Celebration

Oct. 31: Pine Ridge Bible Camp invites you to its annual Family Harvest Celebration on Friday, October 31, from 6 to 8 p.m. This free event includes hayride, games, puppet show, cider, donuts and trip through Treat Town. Please bring a bag for collecting treats. It is a fun night for the whole family. Costumes welcome but not necessary. Please no witches, ghosts, monsters, etc. Pine Ridge is located just 5 miles east of town at 8415 17 Mile Rd. Call 616-696-8675 for more information.

Trunk or Treat at Crossfire Church

Oct. 31: Trunk or Treat at Crossfire Church, 4780 Cornfield Drive, Cedar Springs, from 6-8 p.m. There will be games and prizes, candy for the kids, hot dogs and chips available.

Ghostbusters at the Kent Theatre

Oct. 31, Nov. 1, Nov.2: Don’t let the Halloween weekend go by without spending some time at the Kent Theatre. A special showing of Ghostbusters will be on the big screen October 31, November 1 and 2, in celebration of Ghostbusters 30th Anniversary. Now in digital format, watch your favorite ghost busting team in action! Showing Halloween night at 6 and 9 p.m., Saturday at 3, 6 and 9 p.m. and Sunday at 3 and 6 pm. Tickets are only $3.00.

Sand Lake Fire Department

Oct. 31: The Sand Lake Fireman’s Association will host their annual Halloween festivities at the fire station at 2 Maple Street in Sand Lake from 6-8 p.m. There will be games, a bounce house, prize drawings, goody bags, cider, donuts, and coffee. There will also be a costume contest. Judging is at 7:15, must be present to win the contest. Call 636-8854 for more info.

Trick or Treat at Meadowlark

Oct. 31: Meadowlark Retirement Village in Sparta loves having trick or treaters. Their doors will be open from 6-8 p.m. on Friday, October 31. The residents can’t wait to see all the kids dressed up! Meadowlark is located at 65 Ida Red Ave, Sparta. Call 887-8891 ext. 102 for more info.

 

 

 

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Fresh Market: The Pumpkin—a Halloween tradition

HAL-FreshMarket-Pumpkin

By Vicky Babcock

Google “pumpkin” and you will find everything from riots in (Keene) New Hampshire to Ichabod Crane’s unfortunate encounter with the headless horseman, to pumpkin scones. We have pumpkin festivals, pumpkin carving contests, smashing pumpkins, pumpkin tossing, pumpkin baking and biggest pumpkin contests.

A true Native American, the pumpkin has been embraced by our cultures as both an important food source for people and livestock, and an excellent medium for carving. Something about these colorful canvasses really stirs the creative juices in artists of all ages! Throw in a candle and you have a lovely Jack-o-lantern. With its growing season complete from early to mid October, is it any wonder that this vibrantly colored fruit has become synonymous with Halloween? Yet pumpkins have a relatively short history with the holiday known as Halloween, which is believed to have evolved from the ancient festival of Samhain. It has its origins in European culture. Samhain was the Celtic harvest festival, a time to stock up supplies for the winter. The ancient Gaels believed the final day in October to be a time when the two worlds (the living and the dead) overlapped allowing the dead to return to Earth and cause havoc among the living. Offerings from the harvest were left outside their doors to appease the spirits in an effort to prevent them from bringing sickness and blight to the crops. Door to door begging, or “souling,” (a precursor to our modern day trick-or-treat) came much later and was associated with All Souls Day.

Our native pumpkin entered into the holiday when Irish immigrants brought the tradition of the Jack-o-lantern—originally a carved turnip or gourd—to the U.S. during the 1700s. Turnips had their drawbacks; they were relatively small and dense, with no pre-formed cavity in which to place a lit coal. With its broad base and large capacity, the pumpkin quickly became the preferred medium for the practice. Today, a large percentage of fresh bought pumpkins lends itself to this Halloween tradition, decorating our porches and giving young artists a chance to stretch their creative wings. Once used as a welcoming light for the spirits of our loved ones and to ward off any malevolent spirits, the Jack-o-Lantern has become a Halloween fantasy, a joyful pastime and a profitable market for farmers of the crop. Unfortunately, few of us these days consume pumpkin that does not come out of a can.

Unfortunate, because pumpkin, one of the winter squashes, is an excellent source of dietary nutrition. Pumpkins are rich in beta-carotene, an important antioxidant, which the body uses to convert to vitamin A. Foods rich in beta-carotene have been linked to lower risk of certain cancers and offer protection against heart disease as well as an aid in the degenerative aspects of aging. Pumpkin is high in potassium and dietary fiber as well, necessary nutrients for the heart and digestive tract respectively. A cup of cooked pumpkin contains about 49 calories, a dieter’s dream!

So, as you carve your pumpkins this year, consider using the cut outs (minus the rind) in soups, stews or rice dishes. Or try some pumpkin chili. Any way you slice it, it comes out deliciously nutritious.

Like pumpkins—and despite its ancestry—Halloween is a true American treat. With the mix of cultures that make up today’s Halloween, what greater place to celebrate than the Great Melting Pot of the world? Have a safe and happy Halloween. And happy “souling.”

 

Pumpkin Chili

1 ½ pounds lean ground beef

1 medium onion, chopped

2 cloves garlic, diced

2 large carrots, washed and diced (ends removed)

2 cups fresh pumpkin, peeled and diced

1 jar salsa—medium heat

1 15-oz can diced tomatoes

2 cans black beans, rinsed and drained

Chili powder (to taste)

In a large skillet, brown beef. Drain most of the oils and remove beef to a Dutch oven. In saucepan in remaining oil, cook and stir onion, garlic, carrots and pumpkin for about two minutes, until onion is tender. Drain the rest of the oil and add to the beef. Add remaining ingredients except for the chili powder. Cook and stir until boiling. Reduce heat and add chili powder to taste. This will gain some heat as it cooks, so start lightly. Cook over med to low heat about 30 minutes or until pumpkin is tender and flavors have mixed. Add additional chili powder about 15 minutes into the cooking process if you wish.

Serve with grated cheese, crushed corn chips (I like Frito’s™ Chili Cheese) and sour cream if desired. Other additions include chopped fresh onions or chopped bell peppers. This is even better the next day.

Fresh Market is brought to you by Solon Market located at 15185 Algoma Avenue.  For more information call 616-696-1718.  Like us on facebook for updates.

 

 

Posted in Awesome Autumn, Halloween fun, RecipesComments (0)

Building bonds between Dads and kids

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

(Family Features)

For many adults, the times spent with their fathers are among their most treasured memories. However, today as many as one in three children in America live in a home where a biological father is not present.

The reasons for paternal absence can vary. For example, fathers may stay distant from a child out of fear of being inadequate or failing the child. Despite difficult circumstances, in many cases there are solutions that allow fathers to maintain an important presence in their children’s lives.

The following are many of the common reasons for fathers’ absences along with guidance on how to help resolve the situation, provided by Dr. Janet Taylor, an author and community psychiatrist.

Guilt

Many fathers have guilt for not having the financial means to buy things for their kids. Fathers need to understand their children love them because they are their father and not because of the “things” they give them.

“A father’s time and involvement in a child’s life is a true gift,” Dr. Taylor says. “Give the gift of your time and it will mean the world to them.”

Family Conflict

Disputes among family members may also keep a father away. When conflicts arise with a mother, grandparents or other family members, a child should know he or she is not the problem, Dr. Taylor cautions.

Doubts about paternity can be an especially trying source of family conflict. A paternity test can help eliminate this uncertainty. To help address paternity questions, Identigene offers an affordable DNA paternity test kit that is sold in drug stores and supercenters and is 100 percent accurate.

Dr. Taylor advocates for fathers to make an effort to spend time with their children in the midst of conflict, even if circumstances dictate that time together is in a group setting rather than one-on-one.

Failed Personal Connections 

Another reason a father might stay away is the result of a lack of a father figure in his own life. Dr. Taylor calls parenting the ultimate “on the job training.” She recommends working to make a connection to break the cycle from repeating in the next generation.

Fathers Have Value

“Fathers also need to recognize their value in their kids’ lives,” Dr. Taylor says. A recent survey sponsored by Identigene found that most Americans who are looking to address a paternity issue understand there are many benefits of having a biological father in a child’s life, including providing the child with a sense of family and self (73%), enhancing the child’s self-esteem (70%) and offering the child with a masculine parental figure (69%). According to Fatherhood.org, children who do not have a father figure in their life are more likely to endure financial hardship, use drugs, quit school or engage in criminal behavior.

“This data serves as a testament that a father’s active participation does make a difference,” Dr. Taylor says. “Hopefully it encourages those fathers who have not had a role in their child’s life to develop a bond that can truly re-shape a young person’s entire childhood.”

For more information, visit www.DNAtesting.com.

 

 

 

 

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Help Dad perfect his grill skills this season

FATH-Perfect-grill-skills(StatePoint) The seasoned griller commands an arsenal of experience and recipes, all having been painstakingly passed through the generations and perfected over time and temperature. The origin of these tasty traditions usually can be found in family, and the one often deserving the credit is dear old Dad.

Southern grilling guru Fred Thompson, author of the new book “Williams-Sonoma Grill Master” a collection of back-to-basics tips and recipes, recalls the influence of his father as early as nine years old. “Every Saturday night my father grilled rib-eye steaks. I wanted to keep up with daddy so I hung out at the grill,” he says. “I was fascinated with what my father could do.”

This Father’s Day and BBQ season, try honoring the Old Man with delicious tradition.  So light that fire!

Take a page out of Thompson’s book and learn the secrets to grilling the perfect steak:

• Buy good meat: Grass-fed and grass-finished beef tastes better and has a bolder flavor that holds up particularly well against the lick of the grill’s flames.

• Simple seasoning: Sprinkle steak liberally on both sides with salt and pepper when you take it out of the refrigerator. Brush steaks on both sides with a little olive oil (not extra virgin). This facilitates the heat transfer, so you can get an evenly browned crust and a delicious steak house flavor.

• Timing is important: There’s nothing worse than a rubbery, tasteless overcooked steak. Professionals use touch to gauge doneness, and so can you. Touch your index finger to your cheek. When the meat feels this way, the steak is rare. Touch the tip of your nose. That firmness equates to medium. Your forehead is well done. “But please don’t go there,” says Thompson.

• Let it rest: If you cut into a piece of beef as soon as it comes off the grill, you will lose precious juices. Give the proteins in the steak the opportunity to unwind a little bit from the heat they have just experienced. Let most steaks rest at least five to 10 minutes to give the juices time to redistribute evenly throughout the meat.

• Goes great with: Skip the steak sauce. A pat of plain or compound butter is the perfect finish.

Even experienced grillers need new tips, tools and tricks to perfect their steaks, ribs and dry rub techniques. Consider gifting dad a successful grilling season with “Grill Master.” Grill tips, BBQ recipes and information about the book can be found at www.WeldonOwen.com.

“There’s a mystique that happens with smoke and flame that you just can’t get any way else, and it’s pretty simple to create,” says Thompson.

 

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Easter Coloring Contest Winners

Age Group: 3-4 yrs

 

Morgan Sanders age 3 of Cedar Springs

Morgan Sanders
age 3 of Cedar Springs

 

Age Group: 5-7 yrs

Hannah Rae Dempsey age 6 of Cedar Springs

Hannah Rae Dempsey
age 6 of Cedar Springs

 

Age Group: 8-10 yrs

Ryan Hebert age 9 of Cedar Springs

Ryan Hebert
age 9 of Cedar Springs

 

Winners may pick up their prize Easter Baskets at The POST, 36 E. Maple St., Cedar Springs 10 am to 5pm Mon.-Fri. Or call The POST at 616-696-3655 to make pick up arrangements.

 

 

 

 

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Winning treats to please kids and adults this Easter

EAS-Winning-Easter-treats-1-webFamily Features

 

When you think of Easter goodies there’s a good chance the flavorful jelly bean comes to mind – a big hit with kids young and old. But, because flavor preferences change with age, it stands to reason that not all Easter gifts are created equal.

So, how do you navigate the taste bud temperament of loved ones so everyone will receive special Easter treats they love? With more than 100 flavors of jelly beans under their belts, Jelly Belly Candy Company has an idea of what types of flavors will be more popular with both kids and grownups.

“When we talked to kids, we learned that the more complex or exotic the flavor, the less likely they were to enjoy it,” said Lisa Brasher, executive vice chairman and a fifth generation candy maker for company.

As a renowned candy expert and author of “Candy: The Sweet History,” Beth Kimmerle added, “Classic flavors like apples and berries are typically the most popular with the younger crowd. Adults crave the more adventurous flavors.”

Understanding age and preferences

Flavor innovation keeps a company like Jelly Belly on its toes. As people age, their taste buds mature and become more open to those complex flavor profiles children shy away from. The coconut flavor is a great example of this.

“Although our panel of kids gave coconut low scores, when you look at adults who purchase our jelly beans, it’s is a very popular one,” explained Brasher.

EAS-Winning-Easter-treats-2-webFlavors for everyone

By taking the feedback from children of all ages into consideration, the jelly bean company assembled its youthful Kids Mix, a collection of 20 flavors kids love. The mix makes it easier for anyone to pick winning flavors like cotton candy, berry blue and watermelon for Easter treats. More adult-friendly flavors like licorice, cinnamon and buttered popcorn are purposefully absent from the mix.

According to Brasher, there was one surprise among the company’s findings, “We were shocked when caramel corn didn’t crack the top twenty flavors with the kids,” she said.

One sweet agreement

Despite their palate differences, kids and adults can agree on one thing—very cherry is their top pick. It’s the most popular Jelly Belly bean flavor in America, placing among the top two since its debut almost 40 years ago. For a brief period, it was upset by buttered popcorn and fell to the number two position, but it’s been consistently the winning flavor since.

“I don’t see that changing any time soon,” said Brasher.

Treat tips

When it comes to giving the best Easter treats, keep these tips in mind:

For the little ones: Give them what they want. Stick to tried and true fruity flavors and other kid-friendly tastes like cotton candy and toasted marshmallow.

For the grownups: Go with complex flavors and new flavor experiences, such as the unique offerings of chili mango, draft beer and cappuccino.

Save and celebrate: Be sure to hold onto your favorite jelly bean flavors to enjoy on National Jelly Bean Day. This year, it’s just two days after Easter on April 22nd.

Use these gift tips and you’ll see many smiles on Easter morning. For other flavorful ideas, visit www.jellybelly.com.

 

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Easter services 2014

 

God wants a relationship with you. Take time to worship at one of the following churches during Holy Week next week and let God prepare your heart to celebrate the joy of Easter!

 

Community Good Friday Service

April 18: You are invited to join together in worship with the churches of Cedar Springs for our community Good Friday service at 7 p.m. on Friday, April 18, at The Springs Church, 135 N. Grant Street, Cedar Springs. Childcare will be provided. This program is being sponsored by the Cedar Springs Ministerial Association.

 

Resurrection Celebration

Cedar Springs High School – 204 E. Muskegon, Cedar Springs

April 19: Would you like a new way to celebrate Easter this year? Or, are you wondering how Easter is even relevant to life today? Either way, you won’t want to miss Resurrection Celebration, coming to Cedar Springs High School on Saturday, April 19 at 2 and 7 p.m. This community production is a musical drama highlighting the birth, life, death and struggles of Jesus Christ. Bring your friends and family to see this exciting event. Admission is free, but tickets are encouraged. Pick up tickets at The Springs Church from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday; and at The Cedar Springs Post, Cedar Springs Public Library, Main Street Restaurant, Alpha Omega Coffee and Games, and Perry’s Place, all in downtown Cedar Springs.

 

Blessed John Paul II Catholic Parish

3110 17 Mile Road, Cedar Springs

April 17: Holy Thursday. Lamb dinner and potluck starting at 5:30, Mass of the Lord’s Supper at 7:00 PM

April 18: Good Friday. 12:00 PM The Celebration of the Lord’s Passion, individual Confession at 1:30 PM

April 19: Holy Saturday: Easter Vigil Mass at 8:00 PM

April 20: Easter Sunday: 10:00 Am Mass and 5:00 PM Mass

 

Mary Queen of Apostles Catholic Parish

1 W. Maple Street, Sand Lake

April 18: Good Friday: 8:00 AM Morning Prayer, 6:30 PM Stations of the Cross

April 20: Easter Sunday: 8:00 AM Mass, 9:30 AM Mass

 

Calvary Assembly of God

810 17 Mile Road (1.5 miles west of Algoma Avenue)

April 20: Easter morning service at 10:30am

Get all the details at http://cscalvary.org

 

Solon Center Wesleyan Church

15671 Algoma Ave.., Cedar Springs  (just N. of 19 Mile Rd.)

April 19: Saturday Easter Eggstravaganza, 1 – 2:30 p.m.

April 20: Easter morning worship services at 9:30 & 11:15 a.m.

 

Holy Spirit Episcopal Church

1200 Post Dr. NE, Belmont (corner of Post and Pine Island drives)

April 13:  Palm Sunday, 10 a.m.

April 17:  Maundy Thursday, 7 p.m.

April 18:  Good Friday, 7 p.m.

April 19:  Easter Saturday, 7 p.m.

April 20:  Easter Sunday breakfast at 8:30 a.m, followed by worship service at 10 am.

 

First Baptist Church

233 S. Main St., Cedar Springs

April 18: Good Friday Service at 6:30 PM

April 20: Sonrise Service at 8:30 AM

April 20: Easter Family Breakfast at 9:30 AM

April 20: Easter Worship at 10:45 AM, NO PM Service

 

Resurrection Lutheran Church

616-636-5502

180 Northland Dr. Sand Lake, MI. (just north of Sand Lake)

April 13: Palm Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m. (with egg hunt to follow)

April 18: Good Friday Service, 7:30 p.m.

April 20: Easter Breakfast, 8:15 a.m.

April 20: Easter Worship Service 9:30 a.m.

 

East Nelson United Methodist Church

9024 18 Mile Rd. NE, Cedar Springs

April 20: Easter Morning Worship at 9:30 a.m. with brunch following

 

Grace Evangelical Free Church

4714 13 Mile Rd., Rockford • www.gracerockford.com

April 19: Family Easter Carnival 10:30-12:00.  Easter egg hunt will start right at 10:30 with indoor carnival games to follow.

April 20: Sunrise Service – 8:30, Morning Worship – 10:45

 

Courtland-Oakfield United Methodist Church

10295 Myers Lake Ave., Rockford (just north of 12 Mile)

April 17: Maundy Thursday 9:30 a.m., breakfast and communion

April 19: Saturday Easter Eggstravaganza egg hunt and more 12 noon to 1:30 p.m.

April 20: Easter morning worship at 10 a.m., breakfast 8:30-9:30 a.m.

 

The Springs

135 N. Grant St, Cedar Springs

April 20: Easter Worship Celebration 9:45 & 11:15 a.m.

This Easter, when the eggs are found and the baskets are unwrapped, will you feel satisfied or still searching? Join us at The Springs Church for a celebration full of joy and meaning, not empty ritual. Your whole family will enjoy the great music, fun for the kids, and a message that will bring direction and encouragement to your faith journey. Come find what’s missing in your Easter! We’ll be looking for you. For more information visit our website www.thespringschurch.info or call 616.696.2970. We hope to see you at The Springs this Easter!

 

Rockford Springs Community Church

5815 Fourteen Mile Road, Rockford

April 17: Maundy Thursday service 7:00 p.m.

April 20: Easter morning worship at 9:30 a.m.

 

North Kent Community Church

1480 Indian Lakes Rd. NE, Sparta

April 20: Easter Morning Worship at 10 a.m.

 

Cedar Springs United Methodist Church

140 S. Main St. in downtown Cedar Springs

Make plans to worship during holy week:

April 13: Palm Sunday Worship at 9:00 a.m. & 11:30 a.m.

April 17: Holy Thursday Worship with Holy Communion at 7:00 p.m.

April 18: Good Friday Prayer stations in the sanctuary until 10:00 p.m.

April 20: Easter Sunday 7:30 a.m. Sunrise service on front lawn, 8:00-8:45 a.m. Breakfast in Fellowship Hall (free-will offering), 9:00 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. Worship service, 10:15 a.m. Christian Education for all ages

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Fun Easter activities for kids

N-Easter-egg-hunt-promo

The Cedar Springs Post will not be holding an Easter Egg hunt this year, but watch for the community Easter egg hunt to be back next year, possibly with a new host. For this year, you can find plenty of Easter fun at the hunts below!

 

Easter bunny at the library

April 11: The Easter Bunny will stop by the Cedar Springs Public Library on Friday, April 11 from noon to 1 p.m. He will bring along some small bunnies and lambs from Double K Farms for children to pet. Come and enjoy stories and a craft, too.

 

Easter egg hunt at nature center

April 12:  The Howard Christensen Nature Center is having its 3rd annual Easter egg hunt on Saturday, April 12, from 10 a.m. to noon, rain, shine or snow. Hunts starts promptly at 10 a.m. for ages 3 and under; 10:45 a.m. for ages 4 to 7; and 11:30 a.m. for ages 8 to 11. Bring a basket, or they will have extras. They will have over 1,500 eggs this year, prizes, and lots of candy! Golden and silver eggs are special. Meet at the Interpretive Center, event takes place in their prairie area just north of the Interpretive Center, beyond the parking lot. Visit www.lilysfrogpad.com for more details.

 

Easter bunny at Sand Lake

April 12: The Easter Bunny will visit the Sand Lake VFW on Saturday, April 12, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Stop by and say hello!

 

Easter egg hunt at Resurrection Lutheran

April 13: On your mark get set go! Resurrection Lutheran Church, 180 Northland Drive, Sand Lake, will hold their Easter egg hunt on April 13 immediately following 9:30 a.m. service. Games and crafts, too. This event is open to the public and we welcome seekers of all ages. Please come join us. We love meeting new friends and please feel free to invite others!

 

Easter egg hunt at Courtland-Oakfield UMC

April 19: Courtland-Oakfield United Methodist Church will hold an Easter Eggstravaganza egg hunt and more from noon to 1:30 p.m., on Saturday, April 19. They are located 10295 Myers Lake Avenue, Rockford, between 12 and 13 Mile.

 

Family Easter carnival and egg hunt at Grace Evangelical

April 19: Grace Evangelical Free Church, 4714 13 Mile Road, Rockford, will hold a Family Easter Carnival on Saturday, April 19, from 10:30 a.m. to noon. Easter egg hunt will start right at 10:30 a.m., with indoor carnival games to follow.

 

Easter egg-stravaganza at Solon Center Wesleyan

April 19: An Easter egg-stravaganza, a celebration for children, will be held on Saturday, April 19, from 1 to 2:30 p.m., at Solon Center Wesleyan Church, 15671 Algoma Avenue, just north of 19 Mile. All children 10 years old and under are invited to attend. There will be games, candy, prizes, a special Easter presentation, and two bikes will be given away as grand prizes. For more info call the church at 696-3229 or go to scwchurch.org.

 

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Real bunnies and chicks grow into rabbits and chickens

Think twice about giving them to children for Easter

Dyeing Easter Eggs or going on Easter Egg Hunts are a part of the holiday tradition for many families. But there is another tradition that families should consider long and hard before making a commitment: buying live bunnies and chicks.

The Kent County Health Department recommends giving children toy stuffed animals instead. Adults should consider the longevity, as well as health and safety issues, of giving bunnies or chicks to children for Easter.

Rabbits can live seven to ten years, while chickens can live into their teens. “The Kent County Animal Shelter received nearly a hundred unwanted rabbits and chickens last year,” according to Adam London, Health Officer for the Kent County Health Department. “Pet rabbits have specific health needs, special diets, and must live indoors. While they can be very social with the right care and supervision, they don’t like to be held or cuddled.” Releasing a house-raised rabbit into the wild leaves the animal vulnerable to predators.

Raising chicks and other poultry has become popular, but it has also led to an increase in Salmonella outbreaks in humans. Salmonella is common in baby poultry and spreads from contact with the birds or their environments. Birds with Salmonella may appear healthy, but in humans, the bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramping, fever, and dehydration. Illness can last for up to a week and can be serious in young children, older adults, or those with weakened immune systems.

Children under the age of five should have adult supervision when handling chicks or chickens. “Be sure to wash your hands and your child’s hands thoroughly after handling chicks or chickens,” London says. “Don’t let children snuggle or kiss chicks. And never allow chicks or chickens into bathrooms, kitchens, or areas where food is prepared, stored, or eaten.”

Visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for more information:

http://www.cdc.gov/media/dpk/2013/dpk-live-poultry-salmonella.html.

If giving or receiving plants for the holiday, make sure they stay out of the reach of any pets. Some items, such as lilies and daisies, can be toxic to pets. For a complete list, check out: www.aspca.org/Pet-care/poison-control/Plants.

 

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We have a winner!

VAL-BestLipsComing in first was #13-Kissy aka Amanda McGovern, of Sand Lake, with 171 votes. She won a dinner for two at Big Boy ($30 value); a free movie for two at the Kent Theatre with two medium combos; $50 worth of makeup from the Haircraft Company; and a month of free classes for two at Moxie’s Fitness and Health.

Coming in second was #1-Succulent aka Trisha Dart, of the City of Cedar Springs with 168 votes. She won a lotion and tanning package from Awesome Tan, a shampoo and cut from B&B Beauty Salon, and free class from Moxie Fitness and Health.

Coming in third was #10-Pouty aka Micki Martin, of Sand Lake, with 112 votes. She won a $25 gift certificate from Geekworx, a chair massage from Kin of Hope, tea from Perry’s Place, and a free class from Moxie Fitness and Health.

A big thank you to all who participated—those who sent in their lips, those who voted, and all of the businesses that donated prizes! We couldn’t have done it without you!

Winners may pick up their prizes at The POST, 36 E. Maple St., Cedar Springs on Valentines Day, Friday, February 14 between 10am-5pm. Please call 616-696-3655 if you need to make special arrangements for pick up.

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