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Archive | Recipes

Fire up your tailgate with tips from a pro

BACK-Tailgating-ideas(Family Features) Grilled food is good anywhere for any occasion. Whether you’re tailgating in the stadium parking lot or watching the game in your own backyard with family and friends, get ready to take your grill skills to the gridiron. While you might not be in the running for MVP this season, everyone has a shot at being Tailgater of the Year.

Try these tips from world champion pitmaster Chris Lilly to tailgate like a pro this season:

Score an Early First Down: Marinate meat before guests arrive. Try KC Masterpiece marinades, such as Santa Fe Picante, which gives a real kick to meat, seafood and vegetables. It can add flavor to meat in as little as 30 minutes. Also, to be confident your grill will be ready to cook in about 10 minutes, try KingsfordMatch Light charcoal.

Avoid Turnovers: Frequent flipping of items on the grill can dry out the food. Instead, let food brown before turning to develop a flavorful crust, which is the signature of great grilling. When it’s time to flip, use tongs or a spatula in place of forks, which pierce food and release juices.

Don’t call in the second string: One of the best parts about tailgating at home is that you own the “concession stand.” You wouldn’t call the deliveryman from the stadium, so make sure you follow the same rule when watching the game at home. Fire up your grill to experience the sights, sounds and smells of the stadium right in your own backyard with Lilly’s Barbecue Chicken Pizza with Alabama White Sauce.

Need to step up your game with new tailgating recipes? Check out www.Grilling.com for tips, tricks and recipes to take your game day grilling to the next level.

Barbecue Chicken Pizza with Alabama White Sauce

Makes: 1 16-inch pizza

Prep time: 15 minutes

Cook time: 21 minutes

Alabama White Sauce

2 tablespoons onion, diced

1/2 teaspoon garlic, minced

1/2 tablespoon butter

3 tablespoons distilled white vinegar

4 teaspoons sugar

2 tablespoons Parmesan cheese, grated

1/2 cup mayonnaise

1/2 teaspoon coarse black pepper, ground

1/2 teaspoon fresh basil, chopped

1/2 teaspoon fresh oregano, chopped

1/2 teaspoon fresh Italian parsley, chopped

1/4 teaspoon lemon juice

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

Barbecue Chicken Pizza

16 ounces pizza dough

1/2 cup grilled chicken, diced

1/2 cup hot and spicy sausage, cut in 1/4 inch slices

1 1/4 cups mozzarella cheese, shredded

Preheat grill to 500 degrees Fahrenheit using Kingsford charcoal.

Sauté onions and garlic in butter over medium heat for approximately 1 minute, or until onions turn slightly translucent. Remove from heat and add vinegar and sugar. Stir mixture until sugar dissolves and pour it into small mixing bowl. Add Parmesan cheese and mix well. Add remaining white sauce ingredients and blend together.

Roll pizza dough to 16-inch diameter circle on lightly greased pizza stone and spread pizza sauce over dough evenly. Top pizza with diced grilled chicken and slices of sausage. Spread mozzarella cheese evenly over pizza.

Place pizza stone on grill and close lid. Cook for 10-12 minutes, or until crust is brown and crisp. Remove pizza from grill, cut and serve.

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A+ Lunches

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

How much sodium is in your child’s lunchbox?

 

(Family Features) They need to be able to eat it in 20 minutes or less. They need to be able to open and close all of the containers themselves. And it can’t go bad before they eat it. What are we talking about? The lunch your kids take to school each day.

What you put in your child’s lunchbox might matter more than you realize. A recent study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found a significant amount of sodium in the foods toddlers commonly eat. It’s feared that similar levels of sodium are also found in a number of the foods older kids eat at school every day. As concerns rise about the early onset of high blood pressure, a major risk factor for heart disease, parents may want to re-examine those lunchbox choices.

Why does sodium matter? A 2012 study of children and adolescents found that higher sodium consumption was associated with increased blood pressure. This effect was even greater in overweight and obese participants compared to normal weight participants.

In addition, research suggests that children’s taste for salt develops as they are exposed to it. The less sodium children consume, the less they want it. Children’s taste for salt may be reduced if they are exposed to lower sodium diets at a young age. Eating less sodium can help lower blood pressure during childhood, which can help lower the risk of high blood pressure as an adult.

 

What’s a parent to do?

Here are some tips to help tackle high sodium in your child’s lunchbox:

Read food labels and compare the sodium amount in different products, then choose the options with the lowest amounts of sodium. Some varieties of bread can vary from 80 to 230 mg of sodium per slice. That can make a big difference in lunchtime sandwiches.

Pack fresh fruits and vegetables with lunch every day, like a small bag of baby carrots, snow peas, or grape tomatoes.

For a healthy snack, make trail mix using unsalted nuts, dried fruits and whole grain cereal.

When buying prepared meals, look for those with less than 600mg of sodium per serving.

By packing a lower sodium school lunch for your children, you are not only setting them up for success in the classroom, but also in life. With your help, your children can develop healthy, low sodium eating habits that will last throughout their lives and help improve their heart health. For additional information about children and sodium and more tips for parents to help lower their family’s sodium intake, visit www.cdc.gov/salt.

BACK-sodium

 

Where’s the sodium?

Understanding sodium in foods can be confusing, especially when food that otherwise seems healthy may have high levels of sodium. Most of the sodium we eat doesn’t come from the salt shaker, but is found in processed and restaurant foods. This chart shows the Top 10 Sodium Sources for children and adolescents. How many of these have made an appearance in your child’s lunchbox?

 

 

BACK-snack-mixMake-Your-Own Snack Mix

Get your kids involved in making this healthy snack mix.

Prep time: 5 minutes

Cook time: 0 minutes

Yields: 4 servings

Serving size: 1/2 cup snack mix

1 cup toasted oat cereal

1/4 cup unsalted dry roasted peanuts (or other unsalted nut)

1/4 cup raisins

1/4 cup dried cranberries

Combine all ingredients, and toss well.

Serve immediately, or store for later snacking.

Tip: Put snack mix in individual snack-sized bags for a great grab-and-go snack.

 

Recipe and photo from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health

 

 

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Fresh Market

BLOOM-cucumbersBy Vicky Babcock

 

The Cucumber

The cucumber has been cultivated for over 3,000 years, making it one of the oldest known fruits to be raised for consumption by man.  It has its origins in Nepal and was likely introduced to the rest of Europe by the Greeks or the Romans.  Columbus introduced this member of the squash family to the New World where it thrived.  Indeed, it—along with other squash and root vegetables—was described by William Wood as often being bigger and better than  those grown in his native England.

According to Pliny, the Emperor Tiberius had mobile gardens, which were used as a type of greenhouse to keep him supplied with cucumbers throughout the year. Romans reportedly used cucumbers to treat scorpion bites, bad eyesight and to scare away mice. Wives wishing to have children wore cucumbers around their waists (Wikipedia).

The cucumber fell out of favor along with other uncooked fruits and vegetables in the late 17th century. It was thought that uncooked plants brought on summer diseases and were “fit only for consumption by cows,” a statement that may have led to the appellation of “cowcumber.”

Forget caffeinated beverages, cukes are a good source of B vitamins, providing a boost in energy levels. Often referred to as a superfood, they are known to be one of the best foods for your body’s overall health. Cucumbers are 95 percent water, aiding to keep the body hydrated as well as helping to rid the body of toxins. Much of the vitamins are contained in the skin of the cuke so be sure to consume these natural powerhouses with the skin intact. As with any vegetables consumed raw, be sure to scrub them well before eating.

Cool as a cucumber? Cukes are often about 20 degrees cooler than their surrounding temps. They have been used to treat sunburn and swelling around the eyes and can be pureed to create a lotion for moisturizing and smoothing skin. A slice of cucumber, pressed to the roof of your mouth for 30 seconds will kill bacteria responsible for causing bad breath. Eating cucumber before bed can aid in preventing hangovers and headaches. All in all, a hearty powerhouse to aid in your body’s health. Try our salad for a tasty nutritious treat.

 

Cucumber Salad

1 3-oz. pkg. lime Jello

1 cup boiling water

½ tsp. salt

1 cup salad dressing

½ cup sour cream

1 cup chopped cucumbers

1 T. chopped onions

Stir together first three ingredients; let cool. Mix salad dressing and sour cream. Add cucumbers and onion. Fold into Jello mix. Refrigerate until set.

Fresh Market is brought to you by Solon Market located at 15185 Algoma Avenue.  For more information call 616-696-1718.  Like us on facebook for updates.

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Fresh Market

BLOOM-jalapenoBy Vicky Babcock

 

The jalapeño, a medium sized chili pepper, is a cultivar of the species capsicum annuum which originated in Mexico. It is probably the most well-known of the chilies, often considered one of the hottest. However, the jalapeno’s heat level varies from mild to hot, depending on the soil and cultivation.  The heat is mostly concentrated in the membrane surrounding the seeds and in the seeds itself, which is why whole chilies are much hotter than chilies that have been seeded.  Always use caution when handling chilies and keep hands away from the face and eyes as it can be extremely painful if brought into contact with the eyes. It is traditionally picked unripe as a green fruit but it can also be eaten as a mature red chili.

One cup, chopped (90 grams) contains only 27 calories and provides 10 percent of your dietary fiber and 66 percent of vitamin C.  It is low in Cholesterol and Saturated Fat, low in Sodium and a very good source of Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Vitamin B6, Thiamin, Copper, Potassium and Manganese.

Fresh out of garlic? Around here the best deterrents against vampires and werewolves are chilies. It’s also very effective in warding off the evil eye.  According to the web site, Fiery-Foods, East Indians in Trinidad have been known to wrap “seven red pepper pods with salt, onion skins, and garlic skins in paper” and pass it around a baby to “remove najar, the evil eye, which is believed to cause unnecessary crying.”  Another African-American legend holds that in order for peppers to be hot, you must be angry when you plant them.  We assume that means, if you want medium hot peppers you would only need to be mildly annoyed.

 

Jalapeño Poppers

1 lb Italian Sweet Sausage

1 8 oz. pkg. Cream Cheese

4 T. Parmesan Cheese

3 tsp.  Italian Seasoning

A produce bag full of big Jalapeño Peppers.

Note:  If you get the smaller ones they will be really hot. The bigger peppers are mild.

Crumble and cook sausage.  Remove from heat and drain grease.

In bowl mix cooked sausage, cream cheese,  parmesan cheese, and Italian seasoning.

Prepare peppers by cutting in half and removing seeds.  Fill each pepper and place on cookie sheet.  Broil for about 4-6 minutes. Be sure to wash your hands and keep your hands away from your face as these peppers  can be extremely painful to the eyes.

Serve warm.

Fresh Market is brought to you by Solon Market located at 15185 Algoma Avenue.  For more information call 616-696-1718.  Like us on facebook for updates.

 

 

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Fresh Market

BLOOM-RosemaryBy Vicky Babcock

“There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance.”—William Shakespeare

Rosemary’s long time association with weddings and funerals probably stems from this complex herb’s ability to aid in mental activity—thus rosemary for remembrance. Students in Rome wore wreaths of rosemary to improve their test scores—indeed modern studies seem to support this belief. Studies have indicated that this pungent herb may help in the delay or prevention of Alzhetimer’s or age related memory loss. It is a digestive aid as well. It improves mood, respiratory function and circulation and boosts the immune system. It has anti-bacterial and anti-oxidant properties. Rosemary was burned as an incense to protect against the plague and later in France during WWII in hospitals to protect against infectious diseases. The herb is an excellent source of iron, and contains about 83 percent RDA per 100 grams of fresh leaves.

Folk stories abound around this herb. It is associated with the Greek goddess Aphrodite, who is said to have worn a drapery of rosemary when she ascended from the sea. The Virgin Mary is said to have spread her cloak over a rosemary bush as she rested and the flowers, once white, took on the blue of the cloak. Thus the bush received its name, “Rose of Mary.”

Rosemary actually gets its name from the Latin Rosmarinus, dew of the sea.

One 16th century belief states that in homes and gardens where rosemary grows in abundance, the woman rules the household. This caused a bit of consternation among the men, who began ripping out rosemary bushes to prove that they, not their wives, ruled the roost. Sorting fact from fiction can be a bit tricky at times, as in the belief that rosemary placed under one’s pillow will prevent nightmares. This indeed may be true as the herb’s scent improves mood. Whatever your beliefs, consider adding fresh rosemary to your supply of culinary herbs. Its unique flavor will surprise and delight you. And tuck a sprig into your lapel as well. It just may keep the thieves—and the witches—away.

Cautionary note: Women who are pregnant are advised against using rosemary in large quantities. Check with your doctor.

Rosemary Pecan Onion Bread

2 cups milk

2 pkg. dry yeast

¾ cup finely chopped onion

2 tsp. salt

½ cup butter

5-6 cups flour

2 T. honey

¾ cup toasted pecan pieces

Vegetable oil cooking spray

2-4 fresh rosemary leaves, coarsely chopped

In small saucepan, combine milk, onion, butter, honey and salt. Cook over medium heat until butter melts. Cool mixture to about 100 degrees (warm to touch, but not hot)  Dissolve yeast in warm mixture.

In a large bowl, combine 5 cups flour and yeast mixture. Stir to form a soft dough.Turn onto floured surface—using additional flour as needed, knead dough until it becomes smooth and elastic, about five minutes. Add pecans and rosemary, kneading to incorporate.

Place dough in a large bowl that has been sprayed with cooking spray—turn once to coat dough. Cover and allow to rise in a warm place for about 45 minutes. Turn dough onto a lightly floured surface and punch down. Divide into thirds, shaping each into a round loaf.  Place on lightly greased baking sheets—cover and allow to rise in a warm place 20-25 minutes.

Score tops of bread with a sharp knife to form an x. Lightly brush tops with water—bake in pre-heated 375◦ oven about 25 minutes until golden. Serve warm or cool completely on a wire rack.

 

Fresh Market is brought to you by Solon Market located at 15185 Algoma Avenue.  For more information call 616-696-1718.  Like us on facebook for updates.

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Fresh market

BLOOM-zucchini-plant

By Vicky Babcock

Got zucchini? Who doesn’t? This prolific and tasty summer fruit is a gardener’s friend—and their worst nightmare. First time growers will brag about their zucchini crop, only to find that they can’t even give it away! Zucchini—botanically the immature fruit of the zucchini flower—is best cooked fresh, retaining its peel. Because of its high water content, it does not lend itself well to freezing or canning—thus creating a problem for consumers with an overabundance of the crop. Indeed, popular folklore warns against leaving your car windows open during zucchini season, lest you come back to find it filled with the troublesome squash. It even has its own national holiday—August 8 is “sneak some zucchini onto your neighbor’s porch day”—an opportunity to share your largess with less fortunate individuals.

Frankly we think the green (and also yellow) squash has gotten a bad rap. We’d like to do what we can to sweeten its reputation. Zucchini is a great source of potassium, providing about 14 percent of your daily requirements in one medium fruit. Fresh fruits are an excellent source of vitamin C providing 58% RDA. Zucchini contains no fat or cholesterol, almost no sodium and one medium fruit contains about 33 calories. Sliced and eaten fresh, zucchini is a dieter’s dream! And the overabundance? Zucchini bread can be cooked and frozen for later use. Or try our recipe for zucchini relish, a flavorful alternative to traditional pickles. Bon appetite!

Zucchini relish

10 cups shredded unpeeled zucchini

3 cups chopped onion

5 tablespoons canning salt

2 red bell peppers, chopped

2 green bell peppers, chopped

3 cups white sugar

3 cups white vinegar

1 tablespoon cornstarch

1 teaspoon dry mustard

3/4 teaspoon ground turmeric

1 1/2 teaspoons celery seed

½ to1 teaspoon ground black pepper

DIRECTIONS:

Place the zucchini and onion in a large, plastic bowl, and sprinkle with canning salt. Mix. Cover, and refrigerate overnight.

Drain the zucchini, and rinse well with cool water. Squeeze out excess water. Place the red and green bell pepper, sugar, vinegar, and cornstarch into a large pot. Add the dry mustard, turmeric, celery seed and pepper. Stir to combine; add the drained zucchini. Bring to a boil then reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, sterilize jars and lids. Pack hot relish into sterilized jars, making sure there are no air pockets. Fill jars to ¼ inch from the top. Screw on lids.

Cool. Check seal once cool. Refrigerate any unsealed cans and use within 3 to 6 weeks. Great with brats or hot dogs!

Brought to you by Solon Market located at 15185 Algoma Avenue.  For more information call 616-696-1718.  Like us on facebook for updates.

 

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National Ice Cream Month

ice-cream-scoopsJuly is National Ice Cream Month

In 1984, President Ronald Reagan designated July as National Ice Cream Month and the third Sunday of the month as National Ice Cream Day. He recognized ice cream as a fun and nutritious food that is enjoyed by a full 90 percent of the nation’s population. In the proclamation, President Reagan called for all people of the United States to observe these events with “appropriate ceremonies and activities.”
The International Ice Cream Association (IICA) encourages retailers and consumers to celebrate July as National Ice Cream Month. In 2013, National Ice Cream Day will be Sunday, July 21.
The U.S. ice cream industry generated total revenues of $10 billion in 2010, with take-home ice cream sales representing the largest section of the market, generating revenues of $6.8 billion or 67.7 percent of the market’s overall value. (Source: MarketLine, an Informa business)
About 9 percent of all the milk produced by U.S. dairy farmers is used to produce ice cream, contributing significantly to the economic well-being of the nation’s dairy industry.
Founded in 1900, IICA is the trade association for manufacturers and distributors of ice cream and other frozen dessert products. The association’s activities range from legislative and regulatory advocacy to market research, education and training. Its 80 member companies manufacture and distribute an estimated 85% of the ice cream and frozen dessert products consumed in the United States. IICA is a constituent organization of IDFA.

 

Janet’s Notebook

by Janet Tharpe

Ice cream churns sweet summer Memories

Just-a-pinch-IceCream1From hand-cranked ice cream in the backyard to hot fudge sundaes at the drive-in, it’s hard to imagine a food memory that says ‘summer’ more than ice cream. Growing up it was the queen of all treats to get served up a scoop. Strawberry was always tops for me. And to this day, every time I have ice cream I’m transported back to times of flower picking, bike rides and hanging clothes on the line with my mom. (While wearing my favorite sundress, of course!)
These days, on www.justapinch.com, Pat Morris of Augusta, GA is making homemade ice cream a heck of a lot easier to share with your family all summer long. Her recipe for Lemon Ice Cream is like creamy, dreamy sunshine in a bowl. “This is a delicious and easy ice cream which does not require an ice cream maker,” says Pat who has been making the recipe for nearly 40 years. “I love to put a scoop of this lemon ice cream on top of a warm piece of blackberry cobbler or pie – the flavors meld so well.” The secret to the recipe is in the blender! Instead of combining the ingredients in an ice cream maker, combine your cream, sugar, fresh lemon juice, and coloring into a blender. Give the mixture a few whirls, then freeze for several hours. You’ll be amazed at how smooth the ice cream comes out without a bit of churning! Serve with your favorite dessert, or top with fresh fruit or herbs like mint or basil. (Oh, and sugar substitute works great in this recipe as well!)
Another summer favorite is also getting a Just A Pinch spin: ice cream cake! Cathi Smith’s Oreo and Fudge Ice Cream Cake is a wonderful way to get that fresh-from-the-ice-creamshop flavor without all the expense. “This tastes just like a DQ cake,” says Cathi. “The kids love it!!!” And it didn’t take us long to figure out why! Made from layers of ice cream sandwiches, fudge topping, crushed cookies and whipped topping, this is truly a treat for kids of all ages. “You might want to go ahead and make more than one,” prompts Cathi. “[The cake] was gone in a flash!”
Sorbet is the secret to one of Linda Griffith’s favorite frozen treats. Her recipe for Frozen Raspberry Layer Cake combines the richness of poundcake and vanilla ice cream with the lightness of fresh raspberries, sorbet, and Chambord… a luscious raspberry flavored liqueur. This one was truly made for a patio. “It’s a very refreshing cake, especially for the lazy days of summer,” says Linda. “Simple but time consuming, the end result is well worth the effort.” We couldn’t agree more. This pretty, pink layered cake makes quite an impact on all the senses.
Care for an after dinner drink? Lynda Hayes of Port Saint Lucie, FL has just what you ordered! Full of creamy vanilla ice cream and the flavors of banana and chocolate liqueurs, her Dirty Banana Cocktail is like a drinkable banana split for grown-ups! “Back in the 70’s everyone played cards on Saturday night when I was growing up,” explains Lynda. “There were always great drinks to go along with the card game [and] this is one of them. My mom used to make it (40 yrs ago) and now I do. I don’t know what they called it, but it’s sweet, smooth, creamy and delicious! Be careful… you’ll want to drink it all in one sip!”
Ice cream is one of those simple gifts that I just cannot imagine summer without. It’s as fun to juggle a melting cone now at my age as it was years ago as a child… In fact, I think the clock winds back a bit with every lick. Here’s to a crazy, lazy, creamy, dreamy summer for us all!
www.justapinch.com

 

OREO-AND-FUDGE-ICE-CREAM-CAKE-_-Just-A-Pinch-RecipesOreo and fudge ice cream cake

added by CATHI SMITH

Tastes like DQ cake… Kids loved it!! Might wanna make more than one!! Was gone in a flash!
Cook time: 4 Hr 10 Min Prep time: 10 Min Serves: 12 SERVINGS
Ingredients
1/2 c fudge ice cream topping warmed
8 oz tub cool whip topping; thawed and divided
1 pkg ( 4 serving size ) chocolate flavored instant pudding / pie filling mix
8 oreo cookies
12 vanilla ice cream sandwiches
Directions
1. Pour the fudge topping into a medium bowl. Stir in 1 c of the whipped topping with wire whisk until well blended. Add dry pudding mix, stir 2 min or until well blended. The consistency of the fudge topping can vary depending on what brand you by. If it is too thick to spread easily, stir in 1/4 c milk.
2. Chop cookies into pieces, stir into pudding mixture. Arrange 4 of the ice cream sandwiches side by side on a 24×12 piece of foil, top with half of pudding mixture, repeat layers top the pudding mixture with the remaing 4 ice cream sandwiches.  The layers create a neat striped effect when clied. Frost the top and sides with remaining whipped topping. It doesn’t have to look perfect or pretty. Bring up the goil sides. Double fold top and ends to loosely seal the packet. Freeze at least 4 hours before serving. Let stand at room temperature to soften slightly before serving. Store leftover dessert in the freezer.
Makes 12 servings.

 

Lemon-Ice-Cream-Just-A-Pinch-RecipesLemon Ice Cream

added by Pat Morris

This is a delicious and easy ice cream, which does not require an ice cream maker. I love to put a scoop of this lemon ice cream on top of a warm piece of blackberry cobbler or pie – the flavors meld so well. I have been making this for 38 years, since I got the recipe from a cookbook that a school where I worked put together. One of the teachers, Mrs. Barksdale, submitted this refreshing recipe.
Prep time: 5 Min Serves: Makes 1 Pint (can double recipe)
Ingredients
3 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
1 c granulated sugar (you can use splenda)
1 pt half and half
2 tsp grated lemon zest
2 dash(es) (2 drops) yellow food coloring (optional)
Directions
1. Blend well all of the above ingredients.
2. Pour into a cake pan, glass loaf pan -or ice tray without the removable inserts.
3. Freeze for 3 hours in freezer or freezing compartment of refrigerator. It is not necessary to stir, as it freezes smooth. No cooking -let the freezer do the work; no ice cream maker needed. Enjoy. Delicious and refreshing on top of a warm slice of Blackberry (or Blueberry) Cobbler.

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Fresh Market

By Vicky Babcock

 

Lavender – part two

…with immediacy and intensity, smell activates the memory, allowing our minds to travel freely in time.” – Tom Robbins, Jitterbug Perfume, 1984.

Lavender, the base for most dream pillows, can chase away nightmares and ease stress. It is one of the herbs used in four thieves vinegar, which is believed to have been used in the 1800s to ward off the plague. No wonder this magnificent herb is considered to be good luck!

Lavender likes a sunny spot in well-drained soil. It won’t tolerate wet feet. It is fairly disease resistant and pest resistant—an excellent choice in the garden since the deer will not touch it. If purchasing lavender for culinary purposes, be sure to get organic or culinary lavender. While both the leaves and the buds are fragrant and edible, most of the oils are concentrated in the buds.

Try lavender in the bath, the dryer, your pillow or your dresser drawer. Or try the following recipe—we think you’ll agree it’s a keeper.

*BLOOM-Fresh market lavender lemonbars2

Lavender Lemon Bars

Ingredients: Topping:

¾ cup butter 1 ¾ cups sugar

½ cup confectioners sugar 1/3 cup flour

2 cups flour ½ teaspoon baking soda

½ cup ground almonds 4 eggs

1-2 teaspoons Lavender flowers, crushed

1/3 cup lemon juice

2 teaspoons grated fresh lemon rind

confectioners’ sugar

 

In a small mixing bowl, cream butter and ½ cup powdered sugar. Add the 2 cups flour, almonds, lavender and lemon peel, and beat until crumbly. Pat into an ungreased 13x9x2 inch baking dish. Bake in pre-heated oven 350◦ for 15 minutes or until edges are golden brown.

Meanwhile, in another small mixing bowl. Combine sugar for topping, flour, baking soda, eggs and lemon juice; beat until frothy.  Pour over HOT crust.  Bake at 350◦ for 20-25 minutes or until golden brown.  Cool on wire rack—dust with powdered sugar.  Refrigerate leftovers.

Brought to you by Solon Market located at 15185 Algoma Avenue.  For more information call 616-696-1718.  Like us on facebook for updates.

 

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Fresh Market

BLOOM-Fresh-market-lavenderBy Vicky Babcock

 

Lavender’s blue, dilly dilly, lavender’s green, when you are king, dilly dilly, I shall be queen.

You may think we are deviating from our theme of fresh edible foods. Not so. Lavender, most widely known for its use in aromatherapy products, is an edible herb—both its leaves and buds can be used in that capacity. Once a favorite choice for the chefs of kings, lavender somehow fell from the list of common cooking herbs.

Common it is not. Lavender’s unique flavor lends itself well to dishes with chicken or fish, but it is also used to enhance the flavor of cookies and lemonades. If you are trying out lavender for the first time, a light hand is best as its flavor can be overpowering.

Lavender originated in the Mediterranean, where it remains a wild herb as well as a cultivated plant. Referred to as Spikenard in the Bible, lavender is believed to be the oil used to anoint the feet of Jesus. From the root word “lave” (to wash), lavender has been used for that purpose since the written word. It is a natural astringent, mild bug repellant, aid to relaxation and headache reliever.

Check out next week’s Post for more on this versatile plant and try a sample of our recipe at Market. Have a happy holiday!

 

Lavender Shortbread

1 ½ cups sifted flour

¾ cup confectioners sugar

¼ teaspoon salt

½ lb. butter, softened to room temp.

2 tbsp. Fresh lavender buds or 1 tbsp.

dried culinary lavender, roughly chopped

Preheat oven to 325º f.

Mix all ingredients together. Knead until consistency becomes doughy.  Press firmly into shortbread mold (or pie plate) making sure to fill in all the space in the shortbread mold. Bake 1 hour. (Shortbread should be pale in color—not brown)  Unmold while still warm. Great warm or room temp.

 

Fresh Market is brought to you by Solon  Market located at 15185 Algoma Avenue.  For more information call 616-696-1718.  Like us on facebook for updates.

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Fresh Market – Sugar snap peas

*BLOOM-Fresh market sugarsnaps

Imagine a product with a satisfying crunch and a lovely flavor—and get this—you can eat as much as you want with no weight gain!  Enter the sugar pea.  Sugar peas are a free food to dieters, containing only 41 calories per cup. chopped raw.  They are believed to have originated in Europe where aristocrats in France began eating the immature peas, pods and all.  Sugar peas are very high in vitamins C and  A—one cup provides nearly 100% of your daily needs of vitamin C.  Rich in fiber , consumption of these treats helps reduce blood cholesterol levels, obesity, and constipation.

While sugar peas are a treat fresh picked from the garden, they also enhance any salad and are a great addition to stir fries.  The tender shoots can also be used in this capacity.  Sugar peas are planted early in the season as they cannot tolerate excessive heat.  There is also a second planting in August for a fall harvest.  This planting, however does not traditionally produce as well as Spring crops.  If you decide to plant your own, don’t forget that deer like them too!

 

Easy stir-fry

½ pound sugar peas, strings removed

1 T. olive oil

1 green onion, chopped (green parts also)

Toasted sesame seeds

In a heated stir fry pan toss sugar peas with olive oil—cook until tender crisp, about 3 minutes. Add green onion and stir fry until onion is tender. Toss with sesame seed.  Serve alone or with rice or as a side to pork or chicken dishes.

Fresh Market is brought to you by Solon Market located at 15185 Algoma Avenue. For more information call 616-696-1718. Like them on facebook for updates.

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