web analytics

Archive | Fishing Tip

Fishing tip: Fishing with crankbaits

 

From the DNR

Many anglers love to fish with crankbaits (also known as plugs), a type of hard-bodied fishing lure. Below are some criteria to think about when selecting a crankbait.

Body Shape

Fat-bodied crankbaits that are shorter will displace more water and create more vibration. Many anglers prefer this type of crankbait when fishing in dark water or at night.

Thin-profile crankbaits glide through the water with minimal resistance. This option is great when fishing clear water and targeting species that are sight feeders.

Buoyancy

Crankbaits with less buoyancy are better suited for water with minimal cover and clean bottoms while those with more buoyancy are better for fishing around cover.

Crankbaits can be a great lure option when targeting walleyes, bass or muskellunge (among other species). Consider trying one out during your next fishing trip!

 

Posted in Fishing Tip, OutdoorsComments (0)

Fishing Tip from the DNR 

Fishing for muskellunge is a premier challenge

Known as “the fish of 10,000 casts,” muskellunge are a game fish native to the lakes and streams of Michigan. They are a prized catch to many anglers, but present many challenges when trying to do target them. But, if you do your research and are patient, you too could possibly land a big one!

Muskie anglers can choose from a variety of methods such as trolling, casting or still fishing with live bait. Muskellunge tackle must withstand the larger, bulkier lures required, as well as the fact these fish can exceed 30 pounds. Anglers should use much heavier line and stronger rods. It should be noted that muskie fishing success usually requires more dedication and persistence than for other species.

Want to learn more about this valued game fish? Check out their section of the Michigan Fish and How to Catch Them website at https://tinyurl.com/michiganfishcatchthem.

Posted in Fishing Tip, OutdoorsComments (0)

Using stick/body baits when fishing for trout

 

 

From the Michigan DNR

Trout season is well under way with many anglers using dry flies and spinners. But what if you’re interested in waging a battle with the largest trout in the river? Have you considered using stickbaits or body baits?

Many avid trout anglers swear by using these types of lures if you’re looking to catch big stream trout. Stickbaits and body baits mimic the minnows and small fish many trout species love to eat.

Keep in mind you won’t catch large quantities of trout when you’re using this type of bait, but the ones you do find may be high quality and worth the effort. Consider fishing with lures you’d normally use when targeting bass and/or northern pike and stick with natural colors for the best chance of success.

To learn even more about fishing for trout in Michigan check out the Michigan Fish and How to Catch Them website at https://tinyurl.com/michiganfishcatchthem.

 

Posted in Fishing TipComments (0)

Fishing Tip: Try your hand at spearfishing this winter

 

Starting December 1, the spear fishing season for Northern Pike and Muskellunge began on all waters through the ice except designated trout lakes, designated trout streams and other specific waters. No muskellunge spearing is allowed on Lake St. Clair, Lake Erie, the Detroit River or the St. Clair River as well. Many anglers will try their hand at this historical method of fishing until the season concludes on March 15.

Spear fishing is much different from general ice fishing. Anglers will cut larger holes in the ice and fish from tents or small shanties. The shanty blocks the light, allowing anglers to see down into the water in order to spear the fish.

Anglers who spear fish generally dangle decoys or large live baits (such as suckers) in the water to attract their target fish. They utilize spears that typically have a substantial weight to them and have seven to nine tines on the end of a seven-foot handle.

Other species besides Northern Pike and Muskellunge are also allowed to be speared throughout the state. See the Michigan Fishing Guide for a list of opportunities. Go to www.michigan.gov/dnr and type “Michigan Fishing Guide” in the search bar.

Posted in Fishing TipComments (0)

Fishing tip: Targeting northern pike at first ice

First ice of the season is a good time to catch northern pike. Photo from the Michigan DNR.

First ice of the season is a good time to catch northern pike. Photo from the Michigan DNR.

From the Michigan DNR

Many anglers will agree the first ice of the winter season often produces some of the best northern pike fishing you can find.

There could be a couple of reasons why this is so. Perhaps it’s because there is plenty of baitfish for them to target thanks to a decrease in weed cover, or perhaps it’s because first ice is often clear and allows the sight-feeding fish to target their prey more easily because of the penetration of sunlight. Regardless, the coming weeks (weather permitting) are a great time to target this species.

You’ll want to use a tip-up for this type of fishing, with a minnow or small panfish on the end of your line. Keep in mind you can catch small panfish in the lake you’re fishing and legally use them as bait in the same water body.

Target similar areas that you may have fished for northern pike when there was still open water and you might see some success!

Posted in Fishing Tip, OutdoorsComments (0)

Fishing Tip: Go “hunting” for fish this fall

out-fishing-tip-walleye

Autumn can be one of the best times of year to seek out your favorite fish species for a day of fun angling.

Several species to target this October and November include walleye, perch and trout.

Walleye are thought to be in their best condition in the fall, and can often be found in the river-mouth areas of larger, inland lakes.

They’re gathering there to take advantage of baitfish that like to hang out as the weather cools off.

Set your sights on 10 to 12 feet deep to find these big old guys.

Perch will also populate around those same river-mouths, but these fish will likely be much closer to the river than walleyes. Check out depths as shallow as four feet to find them.

Trout will be available in those larger lakes as well during this time period, and can be found in the same areas as the walleye and perch.

Try your luck at some great angling this fall. For more information on the numerous opportunities to fish in Michigan, visit Michigan.gov/fishing.

Posted in Fishing Tip, OutdoorsComments (0)

Fishing tip: A little nighttime fishing

With summer in full swing and the temperatures being quite warm across most of the state, fish will often become quite lethargic. Even the classic warm water large and smallmouth bass move slowly and show less interest in feeding during daylight hours when the sun is high in the sky. However they still can be caught by the angler looking for a little adventure.

This week›s tip relates to targeting bass in the midst of summer…by going nocturnal. Some of the best bass fishing this time of year occurs during the first hour or so after dark. Dusk and dawn can still produce fish but that first hour or two after dark can be exceptional.

After dark, bass tend to move shallow in search of an easy meal. Target them near the same areas you would during other times of the day while also casting and targeting the shallows.

You’ll definitely want to also change your technique. Since after dark you can’t see the weed line or other underwater structures, fishing subsurface lures is not recommended. It is time for surface presentations. Frogs and poppers work great and rarely catch on anything, other than fish. After the cast, work them aggressively with a jerking motion making sure they pop and gurgle across the surface of the water during your retrieve. Pay close attention during the retrieve, watching and listening for the strike, which can be explosive.

For more information on fishing for bass in Michigan, visit their Michigan Fish and How to Catch Them website at www.michigan.gov/dnr. Click on Fishing, then Fishing in Michigan, then under “New to Fishing” click on Michigan Fish and How to Catch them. Click on whichever fish you want to know how to catch.

Posted in Fishing Tip, OutdoorsComments (0)

Fishing Tip: Fall in love with fishing: hook, line and sinker

Have you ever wanted to learn how to fish? Partake in the DNR’s Hook, Line and Sinker program and you’ll be equipped with the skills to become an excellent angler!

This program is available weekly at more than 30 state parks and fish hatcheries from mid-June until the end of summer. The program teaches participants casting and fishing basics and equipment and bait are provided.

Participants under the age of 17 do not need a fishing license. Programs are free, but a Recreation Passport is required for entry.

For more information, visit Michigan.gov/hooklineandsinker.

Posted in Fishing Tip, OutdoorsComments (0)

Fishing Tip: Northern pike tips & tricks to try

A good spring catch.

A good spring catch.

This Saturday, April 30, marks the opening of the inland walleye, pike and muskellunge seasons in the Lower Peninsula. Are you ready to try your hand at northern pike fishing?

Northern pike like to spend their time in the weedy shallows of both the Great Lakes and inland waters. In rivers they can be found around log jams or fallen timber. They are often taken with live bait (such as large minnows) or different kinds of artificial lures.

When fishing for northern pike, many anglers like to use a six to eight-inch wire or steel leader directly in front of hook or lure. Pike have large, deep mouths with extremely sharp teeth. They are known to engulf the entire bait or lure and sever the fishing line with their teeth when it is attached directly to the hook or lure. This leaves the angler watching as the fish swims away with their offering.

Some well-known northern pike waters include Lake St. Clair and the Detroit River and drowned river mouths along the Lake Michigan shoreline.
Want to learn even more about northern pike in Michigan at www.michigan.gov/dnr.

Posted in Fishing Tip, OutdoorsComments (1)