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Archive | Outdoors

Feathered visitor nesting in your yard this spring?

Goslings: Goslings are a common sight in Michigan in the spring.

Goslings: Goslings are a common sight in Michigan in the spring.

Michigan residents may get a surprise this spring in their garden, flower box or even in the landscaping by their office building. Bird nests can be found in some unusual locations.

Ducks’ nests, particularly mallard nests, seem to appear just about everywhere in the spring. Female mallards commonly will build nests in landscaping, gardens or other locations that humans may consider inappropriate, but the duck may think otherwise.

While finding a duck’s nest in an unexpected location may be a surprise, there is no need for concern.

“She will be a very quiet neighbor and with her cryptic coloration, she may go largely unnoticed,” said Holly Vaughn Joswick, Department of Natural Resources wildlife outreach technician. “Leave the duck alone and try to keep dogs, cats and children away from the nest.”

Mallard brood: A mother duck will lead her ducklings to water shortly after they hatch.

Mallard brood: A mother duck will lead her ducklings to water shortly after they hatch.

If she is successful and her eggs hatch, the mother will lead her ducklings to the nearest body of water, often the day they hatch.

“Don’t worry if you do not live near water – the mother duck knows where to take her ducklings to find it,” added Vaughn Joswick.

You can expect the female mallard to sit on the nest for about a month prior to the eggs hatching. If the nest fails on its own – something that happens regularly – Joswick advises to just wish her luck on her next attempt.

Canada geese sometimes build nests near houses or in parks, often near water. Similar to mallards, Canada geese will lead their young to water soon after they hatch. Adult geese can be quite protective of their nests and their goslings and may chase people or pets away by hissing and running or flying toward the intruder. If possible, try to avoid the area.  If this is not possible, carry an umbrella and gently scare the bird away.

Those who have been fortunate enough to have a bird’s nest built in their yard, in a tree or on the ground, may have noticed that the baby birds are starting to outgrow their nests. Baby birds learn to fly through trial and error. They may feel they are ready to fly, but their flight feathers might not have fully grown in yet. It is common to find baby birds on the ground after an attempt to fly. If this is the case, please do not touch them. Their parents will continue to take care of them, even when they are on the ground.

Touching a baby bird will not cause the adults to abandon it; however, if you move a baby bird the parents may be unable to find and care for it. It is better to leave the baby bird alone to be raised by its parents.

In the event that you find a chick on the ground that is sparsely feathered, it may have accidentally fallen from the nest before it is ready to fledge (learn to fly). If you know where the nest is, you can put the chick back in the nest ONLY if you can do so safely.

Birds, their nests and their eggs are protected by law and must be left alone. Unless you have a license, taking a baby bird or eggs from the wild is breaking the law. The Federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act protects migratory birds and their nests and eggs.

This year marks the centennial of the Convention between the United States and Great Britain (for Canada) for the Protection of Migratory Birds – known as the Migratory Bird Treaty – signed Aug. 16, 1916. Three other treaties were signed shortly thereafter with Japan, Russia and Mexico. The Migratory Bird Treaty, the three additional treaties and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act are the cornerstones of efforts to conserve birds that migrate across international borders. To learn more about the Migratory Bird Treaty centennial, visit www.fws.gov/birds/MBTreaty100.

Only licensed wildlife rehabilitators may possess abandoned or injured wildlife. Unless a person is licensed, it is illegal to possess a live wild animal, including birds, in Michigan.

The only time a baby animal may be removed from the wild is when it is obvious the parent is dead or the animal is injured. A licensed rehabilitator must be contacted before removing an animal from the wild. Rehabilitators must adhere to the law, must have gone through training on proper handling of injured or abandoned wild animals, and will work to return the animal to the wild, where it will have the best chance for survival.

A list of licensed rehabilitators can be found by visiting www.michigandnr.com/dlr/.

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Discover Hansen Nature Trail at Millennium Park

 

Fun for the whole family

GRAND RAPIDS–One of the most beautiful nature trails in Michigan is right here in Kent County; plan to check it out this spring. Mark your calendars for Saturday, May 21, 2016 for a free and fun event at the Hansen Nature Trail at Millennium Park. Just pull on your walking shoes, gather the family and make your way down Butterworth Avenue to Riverbend Street to explore one of Kent County Park’s gems, the Hansen Nature Trail.

Designed for adventurers of all ages, this annual “Discover!” event includes a trail walk with nature-themed stations, a water and snack station and more! Kids can even participate in a scavenger hunt by visiting the stations along the walk, for a chance to win a free “Discover! Millennium Park” t-shirt. At each station, visitors will discover something fun and different about the local natural environment, including:

  • The story of the Hansen Nature Trail;
  • Birds and mammals that make their home nearby;
  • The variety of native and non-native trees around the park;
  • Unique ponds and their surprising history;
  • Wildflowers and native plants thriving in the area;
  • Live animal stations featuring reptiles, amphibians and birds of prey!

Visitors can park along Riverbend Street or at the John Ball Zoo (1300 West Fulton) where a free shuttle runs to and from the event. The event runs from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. and is organized and hosted by MSU Extension Master Naturalist volunteers, with support from the Kent County Parks Department, the Kent County Parks Foundation and community businesses and organizations.

“The Discover! program is a great chance to highlight the Hansen Nature Trail and show people the uniqueness of this special area,” said Roger Sabine, Director of Kent County Parks. “Our goal is to build appreciation of natural ecosystems and the important role Kent County Parks plays in preserving these resources. We also hope the event will encourage visitors to discover other parks in our system, and even apply new knowledge to promote nature in their own back yards.”

Check out the Parks Department website at www.KentCountyParks.org.

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Repelling Insects 

Ranger Steve Mueller

Ranger Steve Mueller

By Ranger Steve Mueller

 

Biting insects can drive us indoors. Wildlife are not as fortunate as we are in escaping biting critters. They find ways to reduce the nuisance by selecting breezy locations that keep mosquitoes and black flies away. Deer flies arrive later in the season and provide a painful bite but not as bad as a horse fly bite.

Black flies swarm in early spring. A friend said black flies were in thick swarm around me. I did not receive a single bite. When black flies first emerge, they do not seem to bite. I need to study that more. Maybe males emerge first. They do not need blood for egg development. When tiny black fly females arrive, they crawl around on skin looking for edges like hairline or bite at clothing edges.

When I wore a swimsuit, black flies couldn’t find a place to bite except at the suit’s edge. I treated that edge with repellent and I remained bite free while fishing. Large numbers of these small humpbacked flies landed on me and crawled about but they are so small I did not feel them. We do not feel their bite either. It is not until later that bite sites become red, itchy, and painful.

Avoid insect repellent chemicals as much as possible. Many repellants are not healthy for us when applied to skin. Place repellent on clothes. When biting insects are numerous, keep your body covered for protection and apply a safe repellent to limited exposed skin. Insect head nets are better than chemicals for protection.

Be careful not to get the chemical on the palms of hands because it will get on things you touch. I touch plants, insects I study, frogs, or other life. I do not want to injure anything I handle or leave chemical traces on leaves that are beneficial for insects to eat. Apply repellent to the back of hand and wipe it on face or neck. Do not spray your face because some might get in eyes. Avoid applying to forehead. When you sweat, it will to run into your eyes.

Mary Miller, who worked with me at the Howard Christensen Nature Center, taught me that wearing a bracken fern worked well to keep deer flies from biting and swarming my face. These flies circle our heads and are disturbing beyond their bite. Pick the fern and place its stem in hair or hat. The leafy portion of the fern rises above your head. Flies swarm that instead of our face. It is a simple repellent.

Wearing cologne, perfume, or hair gels attract biting insects and even irritated stinging wasps. We might want to smell great for people but it will attract unwanted insects. It has been difficult to get some students to appreciate the natural world if they use hair gels. They are bothered too much by insects to enjoy the outdoors.

Some people have their own natural repellents. My youngest daughter and I are not bothered by insects as much as Karen and my older daughter. I think it is because Julianne and I have more vitamin B. The four of us were hiking Five Lakes trail near Strongs in the UP and it was 80 F. Karen and Jenny Jo wore sweatshirts with hoods and covered all but face and hands. Biting insects were so thick around them they could not enjoy the hike. Julianne and I wore light weight clothes with skin exposed and insects were not thick around us.

A world of natural chemicals in nature niches attract, irritate, or repel insects. Plant chemicals protect them from insects and we extract those to use as commercial repellents. Native Americans historically rubbed sweetfern leaves on themselves because the chemical in leaves repels insects.

Biting insects are most problematic from May to late June. It is wonderful to be outside but bugs can drive us indoors. Find ways to be outside during all seasons. Staying in open sunlit breezy areas works well to avoid biters. Shaded wet areas have more mosquitoes. Camping in mid to late summer and fall has fewer irritating insects and makes for a better family experience.

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at odybrook@chartermi.net – Ody Brook Nature Sanctuary, 13010 Northland Dr. Cedar Springs, MI 49319 or call 616-696-1753.

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Ranger Steve’s Nature Niche: Hidden Sounds

Ranger Steve Mueller

Ranger Steve Mueller

By Ranger Steve Mueller

Deep within tree and shrub canopy some birds sing to announce their presence without exposing themselves to predators. Gray tree frogs sing from obscure shrub branches and hidden crevasses of house siding. Chipmunks cluck from logs and red squirrels chatter on needle-filled pine branches.

Many of us have experienced a stern scolding from a red squirrel when we entered what it considers its territory. Animals lay claim to territorial space in order to establish adequate room for rearing a family. The living space might provide essential food, water, and shelter but maybe not. Protected territory space does not always meet basic needs for survival.

That is fine for some species because space needed for family raising is different from where they acquire food and water during the breeding season. They leave a smaller size nesting “territory” to feed in social groups or to visit convenient watering areas in “home range” space.

Common Grackles and Red-winged Blackbirds gather in feeding groups within inches of one another but will not tolerate such closeness in nesting territory. At nesting sites, larger territories are guarded by singing males. Even females have territories. Not all species behave in this manner.

Gulls, terns, swallows and several other species nest in close proximity to one another. There are advantages and disadvantages for colonial nesting. Isolation is important for the hidden singers.

Colorful warblers, thrushes, chickadees, sparrows, finches and many others need isolated hidden locations to successfully raise a family. Many do not succeed with difficult challenge. Singing from a hidden podium offers protection from predators when birds claim breeding territories. Sometimes the danger from predators is not significant but breeding song still comes from among the thickness of leaves.

It is nearly impossible to see other birds of their own species in the thick of the woods. Searching every tree and shrub for intruders would take time away from gathering food and courting. Instead, each species has a unique song to sing from hidden locations to warn others “this space is taken.” When one dares challenge the boundary, the resident will hear the song and travel to oust a space competitor.

Territorial singing is most prevalent early in the day. Birds patrol their boundary singing from hidden locations. Sound travels well through the canopy where sight is limited. In addition to sound being an important territorial marker, color is important when the birds see one another. When seen, particular colors might make birds see “Red” in the case of another male and causes them to defend a territory. The beautiful flash of color patterns owned by many birds are also used to woo a mate.

Singing from a hidden location can protect nature niche food, water, and shelter during family upbringing from others of the same species. Once appropriate space is established, the bird can display its flamboyance to a resident female.

Great variety of species behaviors fill habitats. The Red-winged Blackbird does not sing from a hidden place. Instead it stands bold on a cattail in an open marsh. Explore and witness over 300 species of birds in unique Great Lakes ecosystem habitats and their diverse behaviors.

Listen and enjoy the hidden sounds of nature even when you do not get to enjoy seeing the maker.

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at odybrook@chartermi.net – Ody Brook Nature Sanctuary, 13010 Northland Dr. Cedar Springs, MI 49319 or call 616-696-1753.

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Ranger Steve’s Nature Niche: Snippets of life 

Ranger Steve Mueller

Ranger Steve Mueller

By Ranger Steve Mueller

Picking wild blue berries with the family, catching grasshoppers and worms for fishing, swimming in a lake, canoeing a river, climbing a tree with neighborhood kids, catching lightning bugs are all snippets from my childhood outdoor experiences. Each of us recall a multitude of experiences from growing up.

Make a mental list of your experiences growing up. How many are outdoor experiences with family? How many are outdoor experiences by yourself or with other kids? Ask your kids to list outdoor experiences with family, by themselves or with other kids.

Compare your lists. Do you and your kids have similar outdoor experience lists? Times have changed but are you providing your children or grandchildren with experiences that were a joy for you as a kid?

One of my happier moments came with each of my girls separately. I asked each when we were alone, to tell me their favorite family activity from when they were growing up. Interesting both had the same answer. They said going horseback riding at Wolf Lake Ranch. That is something we did during a fall weekend each year. My favorite family activity when I was growing up was going to Wolf Lake Ranch with my parents every fall.

How many parents can say their children’s favorite family activity is the same favorite activity they had with their parents? Going to a rustic ranch for horseback riding, hayride, campfire, and other activities is one way to experience the outdoors.

In some ways, the girls and I grew up in the same time three decades apart. Of course, the world changed but the natural world was there for all of us. We had time to explore on our own and with friends.

Technology brought new advances as I grew. A new thing called transistor radios came into existence, FM radio developed, and automatic engines were replacing stick shift automobiles in my youth. As my kids grew, pinball machines gave way to video games, computers like the Apple IIe hit the market, and CD’s replaced vinyl records.

TV shrunk the world even more and brought distant places and events closer to home. Despite the changes going on around us, our kids grew up with frogs, deer, ants, oak trees, and apples as neighbors. We grew Christmas trees in the yard and learned tree husbandry. Each girl had their own garden. As  waves rolled toward Lake Michigan’s shore, we threw stones to see if we could hit white caps.

We camped in Hiawatha National Forest campgrounds and put our feet in the icy water of Lake Superior. In warmer shallow water of a campground lake, we waded among thousands of American toad pollywogs.

We choked on campfire smoke that seemed to follow us where ever we moved.

The world might be changing in ways we wish it were not but that does not mean our kids and grandkids cannot grow up in a time and place that was present 50 years ago. The natural world provides a place to nurture one’s sole, spirit, and physical health.

Tents are still sold, outhouses still are found in rustic campgrounds, dirt hiking trails are more abundant throughout the state, birds are singing, coyotes howl, bull frogs bellow, and deer bound from secret bedding areas. Raise kids in a time and place that you remember. It is safe and wonderful.

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at odybrook@chartermi.net – Ody Brook Nature Sanctuary, 13010 Northland Dr. Cedar Springs, MI 49319 or call 616-696-1753.

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$5,000 reward offered for info on Turkey Tracts vandalism 

Vandals destroyed this sign just three days after a celebration of the opening of the new Turkey Tracts kiosk.

Vandals destroyed this sign just three days after a celebration of the opening of the new Turkey Tracts kiosk.

The Department of Natural Resources and local law enforcement agencies are seeking information on the vandalism of the new “Turkey Tracts” kiosk located at Allegan State Game Area in Allegan County, Michigan.

The National Wild Turkey Federation is offering a reward of up to $5,000 for information leading to a conviction of the person or persons responsible for destroying the sign.

On April 15, vandals destroyed the sign located on 126th Avenue, just three days after partners, volunteers and individuals celebrated the opening of Michigan’s first Turkey Tracts site.

“Vandalism on state game areas not only destroys the hard work of volunteers and partner organizations, but can hinder the ability to make improvements on the game area,” said Maria Albright, DNR wildlife technician. “Hunter license dollars may end up being spent making repairs from the destruction of public property instead of making improvements for all users to enjoy.”

Lt. Gerald Thayer of the DNR felt confident the vandals would be found. “Our officers are trained for these types of situations and rely on assistance from the public to catch the culprits,” he said. “We are interested in any information regarding this illegal act.”

Anyone with information regarding these incidents is asked to call the 24-hour DNR Report All Poaching (RAP) line at 800-292-7800. Information may be left anonymously.

Turkey Tracts are unique turkey hunting areas across the Lower Peninsula that provide great hunting opportunities for a variety of hunters, including youth, adults new to the sport, veterans with disabilities and seniors.

“I’m very disappointed with the blatant disregard for this significant public-use facility,” said Jonathan W. Edgerly, with the Department of Military and Veterans Affairs and a member of the Michigan Accessibility Advisory Council. “Sites like this are important to our veterans with disabilities. I’m thankful that law enforcement agencies and the National Wild Turkey Federation are taking these crimes seriously and for their determination to bring the offenders to justice.”

The kiosk included helpful information for hunters visiting the Turkey Tract, such as maps of the area, project sponsors and information on wild turkey habitat management.

Learn more about turkeys and hunting turkey in Michigan at mi.gov/turkey.

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Survey: Michigan’s wolf population stable

A wolf is shown in the Upper Peninsula woodlands. The DNR’s latest survey has shown no significant change in Michigan’s wolf population.

A wolf is shown in the Upper Peninsula woodlands. The DNR’s latest survey has shown no significant change in Michigan’s wolf population.

Michigan Department of Natural Resources wildlife division officials said this week that the size of the state’s wolf population has not changed significantly since the last survey was conducted in 2014.

DNR wildlife researchers estimate there was a minimum of 618 wolves in the Upper Peninsula this winter. The 2014 minimum population estimate was 636 wolves.

“The confidence intervals of the 2014 and 2016 estimates overlap, thus we can’t say with statistical confidence that the population decreased,” said Kevin Swanson, wildlife management specialist with the DNR’s Bear and Wolf Program in Marquette.

Confidence intervals are a range of values that describe the uncertainty surrounding an estimate.

Swanson said, based on the 2016 minimum population estimate, it is clear that wolf numbers in Michigan are viable, stable and have experienced no significant change since 2014.

“Currently, deer numbers in the U.P. are at lows not seen in decades and we wondered if there would be a decline in wolf numbers as a result of this reduction in their primary source of prey,” Swanson said. “We also did not observe a significant difference in the number and average size of wolf packs as compared to 2014.”

This latest minimum wolf population estimate was compiled recently after surveys were conducted over the past few months, beginning in December. The wolf survey is completed by DNR wildlife division and U.S. Department of Agriculture Wildlife Services staff who search specific units for wolf tracks and other signs of wolf activity.

“While the survey is primarily a track survey, when available, we also use aerial counts of packs that contain radio-collared animals. In addition, the movement information we collect from the radio-collared wolves helps us interpret the track count results,” said Dean Beyer, a DNR wildlife researcher in Marquette. “Taken together, these methods allow us to estimate the minimum size of the wolf population. In 2016, approximately 63 percent of the Upper Peninsula was surveyed.”

After wolves returned naturally to the U.P. in the 1980s, through migration from Minnesota, Wisconsin and Ontario, the population rebounded remarkably until recent years when growth began to level off.

Over the past few years, Michigan’s minimum population estimate has hovered between 600 and 700 wolves.

Since the winter of 1993-94, combined wolf numbers in Michigan and Wisconsin have surpassed 100, meeting federally established goals for population recovery. The Michigan recovery goal of a minimum sustainable population of 200 wolves for five consecutive years was achieved in 2004.

“Clearly, the Michigan wolf population has maintained levels surpassing these state and federal recovery goals for more than a decade,” said Russ Mason, DNR wildlife division chief.

In January 2012, citing wolf recovery in the region, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service took gray wolves off the federal endangered species list in Michigan and Wisconsin and the threatened species list in Minnesota.

The ruling allowed Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin to manage wolves according to their wolf management plans. Michigan’s plan was crafted with the help of a panel representing a wide span of interests ranging from Native American tribes to trappers, hunters and environmentalists.

The 2008 plan, which the Department updated in 2015, allowed for lethal means to control a limited number of wolves each year where conflicts had occurred. Michigan law allowed citizens to kill wolves that were actively preying on their hunting dogs or livestock.

However, Michigan’s laws on wolf depredation and the ability of wildlife managers to use lethal means, including hunting, to control wolves was suspended in December 2014, after a ruling from the U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C.

In a lawsuit challenging the federal delisting, the court ruling found in favor of the Humane Society of the United States, ordering wolves returned to federal protection. Wolves have since remained classified as an endangered species in Michigan and Wisconsin and threatened in Minnesota.

Because of the federal endangered species status, Michigan citizens may only legally kill a wolf in defense of human life.

After the court’s finding, Michigan, Wisconsin, some private groups and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service appealed the decision, filing their initial legal briefs in the case late last year. The court has not yet released a timeline of its deliberations.

Legislative efforts in the U.S. Congress have also been underway to try to again delist wolves in the Great Lakes Region.

“We have limited management options available to us at this time,” Mason said. “We sincerely hope that our ongoing appeal or current Congressional efforts will be successful in removing wolves from federal protection.”

Swanson said, “If federal protections are removed, Michigan and other involved states would have the ability to manage wolves in a sustainable manner, by utilizing sound scientific principles as we currently employ with other valuable game species, such as bear and bobcat.”

For more information about wolf management in Michigan, visit www.michigan.gov/wolves.

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Teen gets first turkey

OUT-First-Turkey-Ethan-RileyEthan Riley, 13, shot his first turkey on April 24. It weighed in at 18 lbs, 13.5 oz, and sported an 8-inch beard, and 3/8” spurs. Ethan is the son of proud parents Terilynn and Ryan Riley, of Pierson.

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Ranger Steve’s Nature Niche: Beyond belief

Ranger Steve

Ranger Steve

By Ranger Steve Mueller

The wonders of nature are often beyond belief. Constant amazement surrounds us with the antics of life. All sizes, shapes, colors, sounds, and smells take us to emotional highs that enrich our lives or lows that break our hearts.

Science is isolated from emotion and belief when used properly. Science accepts nothing about nature niches without the support of physical evidence from repeated experimentation.

A published study documented planaria could be taught to turn left to eat but to avoid turning right because they would get an electric shock. Planaria are small flat worms about one forth inch long and live under rocks in streams. I look under rocks in the creek at Ody Brook annually to enjoy the emotional uplift of seeing the worms and knowing stream conditions are still suitable for them.

In the study, “educated” planaria were ground up and fed to other planaria. The study reported flat worms that ate the “educated” planaria turned left to eat and avoided turning right. The scientist concluded planaria learned their behavior by eating “educated” planaria. Other scientists repeated the study to verify the findings but the results could never be duplicated. Science discarded the conclusions of the original scientific study. Science is self-correcting through repeatable, verifiable tests using controlled experimentation.

Many things in nature seem unbelievable but repeated tests often support conclusions. One thing people informally test annually in our yards is with robins, cardinals, and some other birds. The male birds fight their reflection in windows until they break their beaks or even die. Bird brains are not smart enough to know the reflection is not another bird and they try drive the other male from their territory.

TV shows try to portray the “ideal” scientific thinking devoid of emotional influence and devoid of making conclusions without adequate physical evidence. Shows like “Bones” and “Rizzoli and Isles” have scientists that do not make conclusions without adequate physical evidence. In the real world, scientific process requires peer reviewed analysis to help prevent erroneous conclusions from getting published. The rigors of science help keep beliefs from influencing scientific conclusions.

Belief is beyond scientific acceptability. Evidence supports climate change is greatly human influenced. Many people however accept or reject it depending on the conclusion they want. Science requires tentative conclusions based on physical evidence. Science conclusions are always tentative pending further study like in the planaria behavior study. People usually believe based on their perception without rigorous scientific experimental support. That is typical with politics and religion. No amount of physical evidence will usually convince people otherwise concerning politics or religion.

The question can be asked, should religion and politics be dismissed because they are not supported with adequate rigorous scientific conclusions? My answer is No. There is a place for multiple realities that impact our lives. Emotions and feelings are a real part of our lives and drive our moral behavior. Science does not include morals. It is about “How” the world works solely based on physical evidence. It is not about “Why” the world exists. Society is guided by melding logical reasoning of “How” with emotional feelings and morals taught during upbringing of “Why.” Religion is a “Why” reality. Faith depends on acceptance without physical evidence. Faith is believing without supportable physical evidence. Science and faith can complement each other for a sustainable future.

When something seems beyond belief, determine if it is scientifically supportable or is accepted on faith. Determine if decisions benefiting future generations should be made based on science, faith, or both. I suggest science and faith together will support a better future and should not be an either/or decision.

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at odybrook@chartermi.net – Ody Brook Nature Sanctuary, 13010 Northland Dr. Cedar Springs, MI 49319 or call 616-696-1753.

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Fishing Tip: Northern pike tips & tricks to try

A good spring catch.

A good spring catch.

This Saturday, April 30, marks the opening of the inland walleye, pike and muskellunge seasons in the Lower Peninsula. Are you ready to try your hand at northern pike fishing?

Northern pike like to spend their time in the weedy shallows of both the Great Lakes and inland waters. In rivers they can be found around log jams or fallen timber. They are often taken with live bait (such as large minnows) or different kinds of artificial lures.

When fishing for northern pike, many anglers like to use a six to eight-inch wire or steel leader directly in front of hook or lure. Pike have large, deep mouths with extremely sharp teeth. They are known to engulf the entire bait or lure and sever the fishing line with their teeth when it is attached directly to the hook or lure. This leaves the angler watching as the fish swims away with their offering.

Some well-known northern pike waters include Lake St. Clair and the Detroit River and drowned river mouths along the Lake Michigan shoreline.
Want to learn even more about northern pike in Michigan at www.michigan.gov/dnr.

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