web analytics

Archive | Home and Garden

Five ways to protect your garden from the deer

Deer damage can be devastating to vegetable and flower gardens, making fencing, repellents and other tactics essential.

Deer damage can be devastating to vegetable and flower gardens, making fencing, repellents and other tactics essential.

By Melinda Myers

Don’t let your vegetable and fall flower gardens succumb to hungry deer. Even if you’re lucky enough to be deer-free now, be vigilant and prepared to prevent damage as these beautiful creatures move into your landscape to dine. Here are five tactics to help you in the battle against these hungry animals.

Fencing is the best, though not always practical, way to control deer. Install a 4- to 5-foot-high fence around small garden areas. This is usually enough to keep out deer that seem to avoid small confined spaces. The larger the area, the more likely deer will enter. Some gardeners report success surrounding their garden or landscape with strands of fishing line set at 12 inches and 36 inches above the ground.

Low voltage electric fencing or posts baited with a deer repellent are also options. Just be sure to check with your local municipality before installing this type of fencing.

Scare tactics are less effective on deer in urban environments. They are used to human scents and sounds. Many gardeners report success with motion sensor sprinklers. As the deer passes in front of the motion sensor it starts the sprinkler and sends them running. Just be sure to turn off the sprinkler when you go out to garden.

Repellents that make plants taste or smell bad to deer can also help. You will find products containing things like garlic, hot pepper oil, and predator urine. Apply them before the animals start feeding for the best results. And reapply as directed on the label. Look for products like Deer Ban (summitchemical.com) that are easy to apply, odorless and last a long time.

Include deer resistant plants whenever possible. Even though no plant is one hundred percent deer-proof, there are those the deer are less likely to eat. Include plants rated as rarely or seldom damaged by deer. And be sure to provide additional protection if you include plants known to be frequently or severely damaged.

Constantly monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of the methods used. Deer often change their feeding location and preferred food. And if the populations are high and the deer are hungry, they will eat just about anything. Be willing to change things up if one method is not working. Using multiple tactics will help increase your level of success.

So don’t let hungry deer stop you from gardening. Be vigilant and persistent and send them elsewhere to dine.

Gardening expert Melinda Myers has more than 30 years of horticulture experience and has written over 20 gardening books. She hosts The Great Courses “How to Grow Anything: Food Gardening For Everyone” DVD set and the nationally syndicated Melinda’s Garden Moment TV & radio segments. Myers is a columnist and contributing editor for Birds & Blooms magazine and was commissioned by Summit Responsible Solutions for her expertise to write this article. Myers’ website is www.melindamyers.com.

Posted in Bloomin' SummerComments Off on Five ways to protect your garden from the deer

A Guide to saving water and your lawn

With the right watering techniques, you can save water, money and time while maintaining a healthy lawn.

With the right watering techniques, you can save water, money and time while maintaining a healthy lawn.

(StatePoint) No longer must you choose between your lawn and saving water. Experts say there are ways to save both water and money that won’t hurt your turf.

“We often see sprinklers watering sidewalks and drives, running during rain, or sending water down the drain from leaky heads,” says Josh Friell, Ph. D, senior agronomist of The Toro Company’s Center for Advanced Turf Technology. “The good news is there are simple, cost-effective actions homeowners can take to save up to 30 percent in outdoor water usage alone.”

Friell recommends these lawn-care watering tips:

First Things First

Most timed sprinklers water in the early morning, without homeowner attention. At the beginning of the season, run each zone briefly during daylight hours to see how the system is operating. Look for broken lines or damaged sprinkler heads, and inspect spray patterns to ensure water isn’t wasted.

When to Water

Experts suggest watering deeply and infrequently. This helps wet the entire root zone and encourages deeper root growth, which helps the lawn better tolerate mild to moderate drought. It is best to water in the early morning around 4 to 5 a.m., as this gives lawns time to absorb the moisture and prevents evaporation due to daytime heat.

How Much to Water

During summer, your grass should receive between 1 to 1 1/2 inches of water weekly, including natural precipitation. Water requirements vary by turf variety, local weather conditions, and site conditions such as shade. Your local university extension office can be a good source of information to assist in understanding local conditions.

The total water applied can be determined by placing a rain gauge or empty tuna cans around your yard prior to an irrigation cycle. Another option is to install a wireless soil moisture sensor, like the Toro Precision Soil Sensor, which fits almost any controller and installs in minutes. This helps eliminate guesswork by continuously monitoring soil moisture levels to prevent the system from overwatering.

Limit Water Intake

Friell says a general rule to keep in mind is that turfgrass does better when managed on the dry side rather than wet. When soil is constantly wet, grass roots are deprived of oxygen and may become more susceptible to disease.

When in Drought

Avoid lawn mowing during heat and drought. Lawns under such stress have limited ability to recover from mowing and can be damaged even more. Instead, mow after a rainfall or irrigation day. Finally, maintaining higher mowing heights will help turf tolerate the heat and drought of summer. Doing so also requires less frequent mowing, which means more time to enjoy your lawn!

Water Rebates

Many cities and water agencies across the U.S. offer water conservation and rebate programs to homeowners to encourage adoption of more efficient irrigation solutions. Find a list of the latest rebates at watersmart.toro.com/rebates/.

You can learn more about proper watering at watersmart.toro.com.

Posted in Bloomin' Summer, FeaturedComments Off on A Guide to saving water and your lawn



By Judy Reed

Many of us here in Michigan grew up loving (or hating) beets. And usually, we only had them one of two ways—either boiled or pickled. Michigan-grown beets are available late July to late October, so now is a good time to try out some new ways to cook and eat them. You can grill or roast beets, eat them in salads, include them in smoothies, or even desserts such as brownies or cupcakes. Now that’s a versatile vegetable!


Beets are very low in saturated fat and cholesterol. They are also a good source of Vitamin C, Iron and Magnesium, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Folate, Potassium and Manganese. One cup of beets is 58 calories, and provides 4g of fiber, 2g of protein, 9g of sugar, and 13g of carbohydrates. The glycemic load is a 5, if you use that scale.

Storage and food safety 

The Michigan State University Extension website recommends the following for handling and storing fresh beets:

  • Avoid using large beets as they can be tough and woody.
  • Wash hands before and after handling fresh fruit and vegetables.
  • Wash beets thoroughly under cool running water. Do not use soap.
  • Keep beets away from raw meats and meat juice to prevent cross contamination.
  • Before storing, trim the stem to 2 inches above the beet. Do not trim the tail.
  • Store beets in a plastic bag in the refrigerator at or below 41 °F for 7 to 10 days.
  • Beets may be frozen for up to ten months.
  • For best quality and nutritive value, preserve only what your family can consume in 12 months.

See the recipe below from about.com on how to grill beets, and another recipe that should be close to the hearts of those in Cedar Springs—Red Flannel Hash, from Eatingwell.com.

How to Grill Beets

Estimate 1 small to medium beet per person and get grilling.

Heat the grill to medium-hot (you should be able to hold your hand about an inch over the cooking grate for about 2 seconds).

Meanwhile, peel and slice the beets.

Brush the beets with olive oil or vegetable oil. Sprinkle them lightly with salt.

Place the beets on the grill. If using a gas grill, close the cover. Cook 8 to 10 minutes, turn, and continue cooking until the beets are tender and grill-marked, another 8 to 10 minutes.

Serve the beets hot, warm, or at room temperature. Drizzle them with additional olive oil for serving, if you like. This is also a great time to use any nut oils (toasted walnut oil or hazelnut oil in particular), since they so perfectly complement the earthy-yet-sweet flavor of grilled beets.

BLOOM-Beets-Red-Flannel-HashRed Flannel Hash (from eatingwell.com)

Makes: 4 servings

Serving Size: 1 cup

Active Time: 35 minutes

Total Time: 35 minutes


2 cups diced peeled beets (1/2 inch; about 2 medium)

2 cups diced russet potatoes (1/2 inch)

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided

1 cup diced fennel bulb plus 1/4 cup chopped fronds for garnish

1 cup diced shallots

1 large clove garlic, minced

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon ground pepper


Bring about 1 inch of water to a boil in a large saucepan fitted with a steamer basket. Add beets, cover and steam for 4 minutes. Add potatoes, cover and steam until just tender, 5 to 7 minutes more.

Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large cast-iron or nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add diced fennel and shallots; cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, 4 to 6 minutes. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon oil and the steamed vegetables; cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are starting to brown, 4 to 6 minutes. Add garlic and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Stir in salt and pepper and fennel fronds, if using.


Per serving: 189 calories; 7 g fat (1 g sat, 5 g mono); 0 mg cholesterol; 29 g carbohydrates; 0 g added sugars; 8 g total sugars; 4 g protein; 5 g fiber; 364 mg sodium; 762 mg potassium.

Nutrition Bonus: Folate (26% daily value), Vitamin C (23% dv), Potassium (22% dv).

Carbohydrate Servings: 2

Exchanges: 1 starch, 3 vegetable, 1 1/2 fat

Posted in Bloomin' Summer, RecipesComments Off on Beets 

Creative ways to take your raised bed and planter gardening to new heights


(BPT) – Generations of space-challenged gardeners have relied on raised beds and planting boxes to grow a harvest of vegetables, fruits and herbs – even in the tightest spaces. Vertical gardening gave us a whole new way to garden in tight spots, by encouraging plants to grow up, rather than spread out. Now, by marrying the two techniques, you can create a visually stunning, artistic display of gardening prowess that will keep your table full of fresh produce throughout the summer.

Building the foundation

A well-built, durable planting foundation, such as a raised bed or planting box made from Western Red Cedar, is an essential starting point. Decide where yours will go and start building. You can find free project plans online to help you build the frame for a raised bed or a planting box.

Whatever style of planter you build, it’s important to choose a quality construction material. Western Red Cedar is often the choice of savvy gardeners because it’s naturally rot resistant as well as durable and easy to work with. It needs no chemical finishes or paints to preserve or beautify it, and is harvested from sustainably managed forests. Learn more and find free project plans at Realcedar.com.

BLOOM-Creative2Simple steps onward and upward

With a good foundation in place, it’s time to consider all the ways you can turn your raised bed or planter into a vertical masterpiece.

Adding a simple trellis to your raised bed or planting box is an easy way to maximize your growing space. For example, you can plant shrub-type plants like peppers in a row in the front portion of the planter, then add a trellis in the back portion and encourage vining veggies like beans, peas and cucumbers to grow up the structure.

For larger raised beds, you can build a vineyard style pergola above the bed. A sturdy pergola made from Western Red Cedar can support a variety of substantial plants such as squash, but you don’t have to be limited to fruits and veggies that grow on vines. Affix small boxes or even burlap bags to allow for greater variety in your vertical garden.

Loftier ambitions

Is your raised bed nestled against a wall? Or perhaps your planting box perches on one side of your backyard deck. You can add a free-standing wall by building a cedar frame and stretching hex wire across the frame. Vines will readily climb the wire, but you can also attach terra cotta pots to the wire to hold herbs, small vegetables and even flowers.

In a variation on the trellis concept, you can build a framework with multiple rows of narrow cedar troughs above your raised bed or planting box; the troughs make a great growing spot for herbs. You can also create a stepped planter by building a series of boxes in graduated sizes and then stacking them atop each other widest to narrowest. Or, for a more modern look, build a contemporary ladder-style vertical garden with box-shaped removable planters.

Veteran gardeners who are also seasoned do-it-yourselfers can go all out by building a pergola. Western Red Cedar pergolas can go anywhere, take up far less ground space than a traditional garden and are wonderful vertical gardening pieces. Just plant your favorite vining fruit or vegetable at the base of each post and train the vines upward as they grow.

One out of every three American households gardens—36 million households—according to the National Gardening Association. With 9 million households in urban areas participating in gardening, it’s a great time to explore creative ways to bring vertical gardening and raised beds or planter boxes together.



Posted in Bloomin' Summer, FeaturedComments Off on Creative ways to take your raised bed and planter gardening to new heights

Save money and water while enjoying a beautiful garden


Rain barrels are making a comeback as droughts, watering restrictions and storm water runoff are on the rise. There are now many attractive rain barrel options to choose from. Photo courtesy of Gardner’s Supply Company.

By Melinda Myers

Too much or not enough water and never when you need it seems to be a common lament of gardeners. Reduce the impact of these weather challenges while conserving water, saving money on water and sewer bills, and growing beautiful gardens with the help of rain barrels. These century old devices are making a comeback as droughts, watering restrictions and storm water runoff are on the rise.

Contact your local municipality before getting started. Some communities have regulations and guidelines for using rain barrels and many offer rebates to homeowners who install them.

Start your conversion to rain barrels one downspout at a time. You can capture as much as 623 gallons of water from 1,000 square feet of roof in a one-inch rainfall. This can be a lot to manage when first adapting to this change of habit. Taking little steps allows you to successfully match the use of rain barrels to your gardening style and schedule.

Make your own or purchase one of the many rain barrels on the market. Regardless of which vessel you choose there are some features to consider when adding a rain barrel to your landscape.

Make sure the top is covered to keep out debris and mosquitoes. Or select one with a solid lid and opening just large enough to accommodate the downspout.

Look for one with a spigot low on the barrel, so water does not stagnate at the bottom. Use the spigot to fill watering cans or attach a hose. Elevate the barrel on cinder blocks or a decorative stand for easier access and to increase water pressure.

Make sure there is an overflow outlet to direct excess water away from your home’s foundation. Or use it to link several barrels together, increasing your water collecting capacity.  A downspout diverter is another way to manage rain barrel overflows. When the rain barrels are full this device diverts the water back to the downspout where it is carried away from your home’s foundation.

And the good news is you don’t need to overlook beauty for function. You’ll find many attractive options in a variety of shapes and sizes in garden centers and online catalogs such as Gardener’s Supply (gardeners.com). Some include a recessed top for storing accessories or growing a potted plant. You’ll find ones with decorative finishes that mimic a basketweave, fine terra cotta, or wood. Those with a flat backside like the Madison rain barrel fit right next to the house, saving space.

Rain water is naturally softened and free of flouride and chlorine; great for plants. Do not use rain barrel water for drinking, cooking or your pets. Avoid concerns of contamination from roofing materials and debris by only using the water for ornamental plants.

Maintenance is easy. Check for and remove twigs and debris that may collect and block the flow of water. Clean the inside of the barrel at least once a year with an environmentally friendly detergent. Those in cold climates need to drain the rain barrel and cover the opening or turn it upside down for winter storage. Make sure to divert the water away from the house once the downspout is disconnected.

Don’t worry about mosquitoes. Covering the opening with a fine screen and using the water on a regular basis will minimize the risk. Or use the eco-friendly bacterial agent Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) that kills mosquito larvae, but is safe for pets, people and wildlife.

Now is the time to start putting rainwater to work for you and your garden. Look for convenient locations for collecting and using rainwater from the roof of your home, shed or garage. A little effort put in now will result in benefits for years to come.

Melinda Myers has more than 30 years of horticulture experience and has written over 20 gardening books. Myers’ website is:  http://www.melindamyers.com/www.melindamyers.com.


Posted in Bloomin' Summer, FeaturedComments Off on Save money and water while enjoying a beautiful garden

Simple summer home improvement: Upgrade your curb appeal


(BPT) – Summer is a great time to complete your home improvement projects, but deciding which ones to tackle can be overwhelming. Here are a few simple curb appeal projects you can tackle this summer to welcome your family and friends into your home with style.

Start fresh with a new front door

For a dramatic refresh replace your front door. From single doors, to double-door options, to those accented with decorative glass or sidelights, it’s easy to find a door that fits your budget and your style. Once you have a panel design selected, pick a material such as wood, fiberglass or steel. Don’t forget to look for an ENERGY STAR qualified option to help keep your home comfortable.

Pick a standout color for your front door 

Nothing adds to your curb appeal like bold, vibrant color. Pick a front door color that shows your personality and makes your home different from your neighbors. From red to blue and green to orange, color can instantly refresh the front of your home. A good place to find inspiration and the perfect color is from the limited-edition Vibrancy Collection from Pella.

Sticking with your current door? A fresh coat of paint can do wonders. Pick a color that coordinates with your home’s exterior, but dare to be bold with color contrast to add eye appeal. Take a look at a Favorite Front Doors board on Pinterest for ideas.

Update your hardware

Refresh your existing front door with new hardware. New hardware can be a quick update and add beauty to the entrance to your home’s exterior design. Hardware is available in a variety of finishes including satin nickels as well as unique designs including modern and traditional. Look for inspiration at Baldwin Reserve board on Pinterest.

Replace broken or damaged items

Replace broken light fixtures, burned out bulbs, and worn out weather-stripping on exterior doors. Pitch that faded wreath, worn out mat, and dead plants, and instead, add a bright new welcome mat and eye-catching seasonal decorations.

Lay a new path

From the moment your guest step off the sidewalk, the path to your front door showcases your home. Flagstone, gravel, or pavers – any of these materials can be used to create a new, inviting walkway in a weekend or less.

Illuminate your walkway 

Make it easy for others to see the way to your front door at night. Transform and illuminate walkways with easy-to-install solar lights. Stake them in the ground positioned so solar cells get enough southern exposure for sunlight to recharge nightlights during the day.

Trim bushes, create great container gardens 

Landscaping should accent your home, not dominate it. Keep bushes below the bottom sill of your windows to improve your view. Trim or replace overgrown shrubs and trees. Keep plant material trimmed several feet away from your home to minimize damage from wind or insects. Fill decorative containers with plants that accent your home’s color scheme, front door, and landscape design.

Visit Pella on Pinterest, Houzz and Instagram for more design inspiration and Pella.com to connect with your local Pella representative for ideas on how to transform the look and comfort of your home inside and out.

Posted in Bloomin' SummerComments Off on Simple summer home improvement: Upgrade your curb appeal

Protect gardens from invasive pests

By following USDA’s six easy tips, you can help protect your plants, trees and crops from invasive pests.

By following USDA’s six easy tips, you can help protect your plants, trees and crops from invasive pests.

(NAPS)—Nothing tastes better than fresh-picked fruits and vegetables. Unfortunately, invasive pests threaten to devour the crops in our gardens and farms, and the flowers, trees and plants in our landscapes. They are a real threat, costing our nation approximately $120 billion each year.

These pests can spread quickly as they come from other countries and have few or no natural enemies here. In particular, the USDA cautions gardeners to be wary of 19 destructive, invasive species known as Hungry Pests, which include the emerald ash borer and Asian citrus psyllid. People need to be aware of these pests, because they are primarily spread in the things people move and pack.

Tips to Save Gardens

Fortunately, homeowners can follow six easy tips to protect their gardens and landscapes, and help keep Hungry Pests from spreading:

  • Only buy plants and seeds from reputable sources, such as established nurseries or online businesses. Ask where they buy their plants and if they comply with federal quarantine restrictions. Temporary, roadside vendors—and even non-established dealers online—may not be doing what is required to keep plants free of pests.
  • If you are in a quarantined area—check www.HungryPests. com/the-spread—don’t move plants or homegrown produce. And to be safe, don’t bring back plants from other areas, including abroad. That’s how the Mexican fruit fly—which threatens 50 types of fruits and vegetables—entered the United States.
  • When doing property clean-up, call your local USDA office to find out how to safely dispose of trees, branches and other yard debris. Moving such materials outside your property in quarantined areas could spread invasive pests. Make sure your contractors also follow the procedures.
  • Don’t move homegrown citrus or citrus plants outside your property. That’s how citrus greening, a disease that is killing America’s orange groves, has spread.
  • Look for round and D-shaped holes in trees. They could be the exit holes of Asian longhorned beetles or emerald ash borers. Also look for yellow, thin or wilted leaves, shoots growing from roots or tree trunks, sawdust-like material and unusual woodpecker activity. If something looks suspicious, be safe and report it using the “Report a Pest” button on the Hungry Pests’ website.
  • For those in the northeast quadrant of the country, inspect lawn furniture, fences and other outdoor items, and remove and immerse gypsy moth egg masses in soapy water. Gypsy moths eat more than 300 species of trees and shrubs, so early detection is key. Report findings to agricultural officials.

Go to HungryPests.com to learn more, or join the conversation on Facebook or Twitter.

Posted in Bloomin' Summer, FeaturedComments Off on Protect gardens from invasive pests

“Light” up the grill: three creative tips for a leaner barbeque 


(NewsUSA) – It’s time to dust off the grills, pile up the charcoal and break out the oversized spatula because grilling season is here! With school out for the summer, it’s time for families to gear up for barbecue parties filled with tasty grilled grub. If you’re looking to whip up barbecue favorites at your next family cookout but still want to keep the menu lean, follow these go-to tips for lightened up versions of classic dishes that don’t sacrifice an ounce of flavor.

*Ditch the Traditional Bun: If you’re looking to cut calories and pack in an extra serving of veggies for the kids, consider swapping your traditional hamburger and hot dog buns for creative and delicious veggie alternatives. Refrigerator staples from zucchini and romaine lettuce to sweet potato can quickly transform into slider and sausage buns. For added flavor and a meatier texture, cook your veggies on the grill with a brush of olive oil, salt and pepper.

*Grill Lean(er) Meat: Believe it or not, there is a way to eat clean and lean without sacrificing the taste you love from richer cuts of meat. Chicken breasts, skinless chicken thighs, pork loin and even flank steak are all excellent options for leaner cuts. Fewer calories aren’t the only bonus—the lack of excess fat will cause fewer flare-ups on the grill. If you’re a fan of hot dogs or bratwurst, consider looking for a leaner seasoned sausage to swap so flavor isn’t sacrificed. Simply Savory Smoked Sausages from Land O’Frost are available in a variety of bold flavors, including bacon and cheddar, chipotle and roasted red pepper, and Italian style with pepper and mozzarella. These sausages have 35 percent less fat and no artificial flavors, MSG and fillers often found in hot dogs and sausage products.

*Tangy Twist: Instead of dousing chicken and pork in store-bought barbeque sauces that are high in sugar, consider squeezing the juice of fresh lemon or limes over meat. If you’re feeling a little bit more adventurous, swap out the tangy taste for a sweeter fruit. Adding pineapple or orange juice can offer the sweet flavors you’re craving without the added sugar. With these simple tricks in mind, fire up the grill and get ready to create a healthier barbecue for your family and friends. For coupons and more information about Land O’Frost’s Simply Savory Sausages, visit www.landofrost.com.

Posted in Bloomin' SummerComments Off on “Light” up the grill: three creative tips for a leaner barbeque 



BLOOM-CherriesFrom the Michigan Ag Council

They’re red, they’re tasty, and they’re one of Michigan’s most prized specialty crops!

Fresh sweet Michigan cherries are in season from late June to August while Montmorency tart cherries are available throughout the year in dried,  frozen, canned, or as juices and concentrates.

Michigan cherry facts:

  • Michigan produces both tart (perfect for baked goods, entrees, snacks, smoothies, salads, and other recipes) and sweet (for fresh eating) cherries
  • Michigan ranks 1st in the nation in the production of Montmorency tart cherries
  • Michigan ranks 4th in the nation in the production of sweet cherries
  • 70-75% of Montmorency tart cherries and 20% of sweet cherries grown in the U.S. come from Michigan
  • The northwest counties of Michigan grow most of Michigan’s cherries
  • Traverse City, Michigan is home to the annual National Cherry Festival and is the Cherry Capital of the World


  • Montmorency tart cherries are abundant in anthocyanins – a natural compound that contributes to the ruby-red color, distinctive sour-sweet taste, and has been linked to the potential health benefits of Montmorency tart cherries.
  • A growing number of elite athletes and everyday exercisers are incorporating Montmorency tart cherries in their training routines, as studies have shown that Montmorency tart cherry juice may help reduce strength loss and aid recovery after extensive exercise.
  • Research indicates that Montmorency tart cherry juice may help improve the quality and duration of sleep.
  • Cherries contain beta carotene, vitamin C, potassium, magnesium, iron and fiber

To learn more about cherries, visit The Cherry Marketing Institute at www.choosecherries.com.

Posted in Bloomin' SummerComments Off on Cherries

Pork Chops with cherry sauce


From The Cherry Marketing Institute, choosecherries.com.

Total Time: 15 to 20 minutes

Prep: 5 minutes

Cook: 15 minutes

Yield: 2 servings


  • 1/3 to 1/2 cup dried Montmorency tart cherries
  • 2 boneless pork loin chops, about 1-inch thick
  • Salt and black pepper, freshly ground, to taste (used 1/4 teaspoon salt, 1/8 teaspoon pepper)
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup onion, chopped
  • 1 cup reduced sodium chicken broth
  • 2 tablespoons orange marmalade
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • Dried red pepper flakes, to taste (used 1/8 teaspoon pepper)


Season pork chops with salt and pepper.

Heat oil in a large skillet on high heat. Add pork chops; brown well, about 3 minutes per side. Remove to plate.

Add onions to skillet; cook until tender, 3 to 5 minutes. Add chicken broth, dried Montmorency tart cherries, orange marmalade, vinegar and red pepper flakes. Bring to a boil; boil rapidly on medium heat until broth is reduced by half. Reduce heat.

Add pork chops to pan to heat through, 5 to 6 minutes. (Cook pork chops longer on lower heat if pork chops are very thick or have a bone in them.) Internal temperature of the pork should be about 160 degrees F.

Add chicken broth or water, if needed.

Serve pork chops with cherry sauce spooned over them.

Posted in Bloomin' Summer, RecipesComments Off on Pork Chops with cherry sauce