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Fishing the piers and connecting waters

Eric Payne with a walleye caught near the pier in Holland

Eric Payne with a walleye caught near the pier in Holland

by Jack Payne

 

Fishing the piers and connecting waters is a lot of fun. Over the next few months, anglers will enjoy a wide range of species. Currently smallmouth bass, walleye, catfish, carp and Sheephead are being caught. In a few weeks king salmon and trout will move in and the whitefish will follow up last. Perch can be caught but often this is a hit and miss deal. Whenever you hear that the perch are in close to shore this will be your best chance to land them off of the pier.

Perch anglers should use some type of perch spreader rig. Good examples are the No Tangle Rig and the Perch Fly rigs from Stopper lures. Tip your hook/fly with a spike or a minnow.

Walleye and catfish offer good sport and good table fare. One great rig is the Ultra Violet Crawler Rig from Stopper lures. The ultra violet spinner blades throw much more light than a standard blade.

The big Colorado blade throws off plenty of vibration and makes it easier for a hungry walleye to home in. Blade sizes range from a size three up to a size 6. Suspended fish that are running in packs really like the larger blades. Bottom hugging fish prefer the smaller blades.

Whenever you casting from a boat or the pier it is a good idea to add a Cast a Weight. This unique weight is added a foot or two above your spinner. You can change weights easily and is adaptable for suspended fish or bottom hugging fish. Add a fat juicy crawler and you are in business.

On the suspended fish try counting it down to five Mississippi. After a few casts let it sink a few seconds longer before starting your retrieve. Under most conditions the suspended fish will be down five to ten feet, or a count between 5-10 Mississippi.

I like using two rods when on the pier or when drifting in front of or in the channel. My second rod often is used for bottom hugging fish. Catfish are always a favorite target and we use a lot of Catfish Tubes or Catfish Bait Balls from Stopper lures. Dip these rigs into a catfish dip or paste and replenish every fifteen minutes.

Another nice option for the second rod would be a slip float. We use a lot of the Big Top Current Floats from Carlisle. They stand tall, are very visible and work great in the current. Under the float you can run spawn egg, a leech, a wax worm or a piece of a crawler. Smallmouth bass, cats and walleye will hit this rig. Don’t be surprised if a huge sheephead or carp gobbles up the offering.

Cast this rig up current and let it drift on the outside of the rocks. The Holland pier, like many others, has sections where huge limestone rocks are piled up. These locations funnel feeding bass, walleye and other species close to the pier. The slip float keeps your offering just above the rocks and snags.

When the fish are out further set your float so that it just glides over the bottom or maybe a few inches above the bottom. Trout and salmon will hit single eggs and spawn sacs. Walleye and bass love a leech that drifts across the bottom.

I like throwing Husky Jerks, Mepps Spinners, Thundersticks and Little Cleo’s on the other rod. Add some glow paint or witchcraft tape to enhance the appeal to a hungry salmon. It’s a lot of fun casting one rod anticipating a jarring strike while keeping an eye peeled on the other rods.

Following Murphy ’s Law, action can come quick and both rods could go off. Nice problem to have. This is common on trout and salmon. Small schools or pods of fish move in and instant action. Then it quiets down for a bit and starts all over.

Our best action is under low light conditions. Getting out an hour before daylight or staying an hour after many times produces the best walleye and salmon action. The piers and connecting waters offer great fishing with minimal expense.

 

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Teacher’s legacy spurs acts of kindness

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N-Random-acts-of-Hazel2-shirtBy Judy Reed

 

Scotty Hazel, a teacher at Cedar Springs for 20 years, was loved by his students for his encouraging, selfless, and giving attitude. That legacy has lived on, even after his death last month from cancer.

Soon after his death in July, a Facebook page was created called “Random Acts of Hazel.” The intent is to honor Hazel by performing random acts of kindness and dedicating them to him. The page already has over 3100 members, and countless acts of kindness have been chronicled there. They even have t-shirts for sale that will benefit the Hazel children’s college fund.

One Cedar Springs grad honored Hazel last weekend by creating a beautiful tree with chalk art. One of Hazel’s poems, Remember Me, is written in the tree. Justin Balczak, a 2011 graduate, spent 12 hours bringing the tree to life on the side of the Edward Jones business in the strip mall on 17 Mile. You can see the whole process on YouTube by going to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FJahTq0ceFA.

The random acts of kindness that people have performed are reaching everywhere. Some of the messages on the page are being left by people who experienced a Random Act of Hazel.

One woman wrote: “Today in Versailles, Kentucky my Dad and I were the recipients of a Random Act of Hazel in a drive thru Starbucks line. To the man in the silver truck who bought our coffee…thank you. Not so much for the coffee but for the adventure of finding out about Hazel, for finding this group, and for inspiring the acts of Hazel we hope to pass along. What a great man he must have been. My Dad, who is 85, said…now that is a legacy I would like to leave behind.”

A woman from Wisconsin said they were visiting their favorite Farmers Market in Muskegon, when a cute little boy held a beautiful bouquet of flowers out to her. “His mom said that he wanted me to have the flowers. I was so touched and could not believe it. Then he handed me a note that explained Random acts of Hazel! What a blessing! We are from Wisconsin and were leaving the next day so I decided to gift the flowers to someone else. A wonderful young couple with small children were walking toward us and I decided this mom might really enjoy the flowers as much as I did so I gave them to her. I explained about the little boy and gave her the note. She was thrilled as I was and said I made her day! What a wonderful feeling! Thank you Random Acts of Hazel! You are now expanding to Wisconsin!”

Another woman wrote that she was buying groceries in Grandville, and had left her debit card at home. The woman behind her told her she wanted to pay for her groceries, as a Random Act of Hazel.

A family from Holland, Michigan heard about Random Acts of Hazel and decided to come to Cedar Springs after church Sunday to see the chalk art tree. They spent time in both Cedar Springs and Rockford, picked up some RAH t-shirts, a copy of Hazel’s book, and then performed some Random Acts of Hazel in Grand Rapids. “It was lots of fun to pop quarters in candy machines to give others a free turn, play some arcade games and then give the tickets to a young boy to turn in, and tip our servers a little extra and tell them we greatly appreciated their service. It will be fun to continue to think of ways to bring a smile to the faces of others. I’m looking forward to reading his book and seeing more about the kind of man he was to leave such a legacy behind,” she said.

T-shirts with encouraging sayings from Scotty Hazel can be bought at Main Street Restaurant in Cedar Springs, and Aunt Candy’s Toy Company in Rockford.

To read more about the Random Acts of Hazel being performed, search for Random Acts of Hazel on Facebook.

 

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Motorcyclist killed in crash

A Rockford man died early Tuesday morning, August 12, when a car turned in front of the motorcycle he was riding.

According to information released by the Michigan State Police, N-Motorcyclist-fatal-Thomas-Clemson, 56, of Rockford, was traveling west on 17 Mile Road, near Barber Creek Avenue, in Tyrone Township, just before 6 a.m. when the accident occurred. A Chevy Impala driven by Cody Jerls, 28, was traveling eastbound and attempted a left turn into a driveway. The motorcycle struck the Impala broadside.

Clemens was pronounced dead at the scene.

He is survived by his wife, 8 children, 18 grandchildren, and 4 great-grandchildren.  A memorial fund has been set up for the family at http://www.youcaring.com/memorial-fundraiser/tom-clemens-family-support-fund/218204.

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The Post travels to Portugal

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Julie Crandall, of Cedar Springs, recently went to visit Sandy, her missionary daughter, who teaches at an international Christian school near Lisbon, Portugal. Sandy just finished her first year of teaching abroad and is home for a few weeks to visit family and raise financial support. While in Portugal, Julie and Sandy visited castles, palaces,14th-century churches and the beach. In the photo taken with The Post, they were at Cabo Da Roca which is the westernmost point of Europe.

Thanks, Julie, for taking us with you!

 Are you going on vacation? Take the Post with you and snap some photos. Then send them to us with some info to news@cedarspringspost.com or mail them to Post travels, PO Box 370, Cedar Springs, MI 49319. We will be looking for yours!

 

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Band readies for competition

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The Cedar Springs High School Marching Band has been working hard on their 2014 marching show titled “Through the Bayou.” The band held their annual band camp last week, which consisted of 115 members attending 12-hour days, playing challenging music, marching in intense heat, and of course, hanging out with friends.

The Cedar Springs Fire Department made an appearance on Thursday when they cooled the band off with their fire hose. The week culminated in a community performance, where the band performed the first three songs from their upcoming season. CSHS Marching Band begins its season on Friday, September 12th at a home football game, so be sure to come out and cheer them on, along with your Red Hawk football team.

The band will be competing at four competitions this fall and then at State Finals at Ford Field.

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Beijing students travel to Cedar Spring

N-Chinese-exchange-photo2N-Chinese-exchange-photo1A group of students from the prestigious Peking University Affiliated High School, in Beijing, arrived July 19, at the Gerald R Ford Airport, to begin an American adventure. They were greeted by area families who volunteered to host one or two students for the two-week program. Peking Affiliated High School was founded in 1901 and has many graduates that have gone on to become leaders in China.

The students, aged 12 to 15 years, were here to learn about U.S. culture and also use their English language skills that they had been learning in China. The schedule provided for classes in the morning at the Solan Center Wesleyan Church on Algoma Ave. The afternoons were spent touring West Michigan. Every week day morning the students would be dropped off at the home of Susan and Mark Hughes and would then be transported to class in a large van. Some of the places visited were the museums and gardens of West Michigan and also included Grand Haven, SkyZone, Craig’s Cruisers, Country Dairy in New Era, John Ball Park and the Rockford Police and Fire Station. The evenings and weekends were spent with the host family for more cultural exchange opportunities.

The program concluded on August 1, at the Solon Center Wesleyan Church, with a presentation by the students about aspects of the Chinese culture and a luncheon that included traditional Chinese dumplings. The dumplings were prepared by the parents of some of the students that had traveled with them, from China, to tour U of M, Princeton and Columbia Universities. We also received a special surprise, when the children played classical piano music, as well as a rendition of “Jingle Bells.”

While here, the students shared with us details of their lives in China. They were amazed by our clean water and clean air. Their school was shut down for three days last winter due to pollution. The students are constantly under pressure to perform at the highest levels. If they fail to meet expectations, they are not permitted to receive further public school education. They then would become the responsibility of their families to educate (if they could afford to) or become part of the labor pool.

If you have an interest in hosting exchange students contact Sue Hughes’ at 616-307-9244 email: sueBhughes@yahoo.com.

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Smokey the Bear

SMOKEY THE BEAR: With the help of DNR fire program staff and volunteers, national fire prevention icon Smokey Bear appears at more than 100 wildfire prevention events each year in Michigan. This year marks 70 years since the first Smokey Bear campaign poster appeared.
Photo courtesy of Michigan DNR.


SMOKEY THE BEAR: With the help of DNR fire program staff and volunteers, national fire prevention icon Smokey Bear appears at more than 100 wildfire prevention events each year in Michigan. This year marks 70 years since the first Smokey Bear campaign poster appeared.
Photo courtesy of Michigan DNR.

After 70 years, Smokey Bear still plays a vital role in fire prevention.

When the typical American thinks of wildfire prevention, the first image that comes to mind is surely that of the iconic Smokey Bear. Since the days of Smokey’s first words in 1944, “Smokey says, care will prevent nine out of 10 forest fires” his likeness and slogans have been invaluable to federal, state and local agencies responsible for wildfire prevention and management.

For the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Smokey was not only instrumental in establishing the importance of fire prevention education throughout the state, but also became one of the pillars upon which the DNR’s highly regarded fire program was built. In recognition, the DNR joined the rest of the nation Saturday, Aug. 9, in celebrating Smokey Bear’s 70th birthday and all that this character has done to bring fire prevention to the forefront in Michigan.

The DNR’s fire program first began using Smokey Bear as a de facto spokesman for the cause in the 1960s, and today credits widespread public awareness about wildfire prevention to Smokey’s broad appeal.

Through the years, Smokey has appeared at countless community events and educational programs on behalf of the DNR, and the bear’s image and famous sayings have graced many DNR fire prevention promotional and educational materials.

“Every DNR Forest Resources Division (FRD) field office uses Smokey Bear at parades, fairs, school programs—anywhere we are trying to spread the fire prevention message,” said Paul Kollmeyer, manager of FRD’s Resources Protection and Cooperatives Programs section. “Smokey is the catalyst that gets people’s interest, especially the young people,” Kollmeyer said. “When you’re delivering an educational program to second graders, you couldn’t ask for a more engaging teacher than Smokey. He really leaves an impression.”
Created by an art critic as part of an advertising campaign to educate the public about each individual’s role in preventing wildfires, Smokey made his official debut on a poster on Aug. 9, 1944. Wearing a pair of dungarees and a ranger hat, he is depicted pouring a bucket of water on a campfire.

SMOKEY BILLBOARD: Smokey Bear’s slogans have changed slightly throughout the years, but have always focused on each individual’s responsibility for preventing wildfires. This is the very first Smokey Bear poster to appear in 1944.

Photo courtesy of Michigan DNR.


SMOKEY BILLBOARD: Smokey Bear’s slogans have changed slightly throughout the years, but have always focused on each individual’s responsibility for preventing wildfires. This is the very first Smokey Bear poster to appear in 1944.

Photo courtesy of Michigan DNR.

Three years later, his slogan was modified to the long-lasting and well-known version, “Remember, Only YOU Can Prevent Forest Fires,” which stuck for another five decades before it was slightly updated to today’s version: “Only You Can Prevent Wildfires.”
Although Smokey was originally a fictional product of the World War II-era campaign, geared at shifting the public’s focus to fire prevention rather than suppression (since many citizens who would normally help fight fires were deployed overseas), his real-life counterpart was found six years later, clinging to a tree at the scene of a wildfire in New Mexico. The bear cub had suffered burns to his paws and hind legs and was flown to the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., where he lived for 26 years, becoming an integral part of the Smokey campaign.

In 1952, Smokey became the subject of a song, “Smokey the Bear,” and that same year, his image was legally protected under the federal Smokey Bear Act, which established three administrators of the image: the U.S. Forest Service, National Association of State Foresters, and Ad Council.

Now 70 years old, the Smokey Bear wildfire prevention campaign is a bit of an anomaly in how popular it remains, still striking a chord with audiences of all ages after seven decades of heavy rotation. According to the national non-profit Ad Council, Smokey and his message are recognized today by 95 percent of adults and 77 percent of children.
“What’s so unique about Smokey is the multi-generational appeal. People and kids of all ages can relate to each other over Smokey Bear,” said Gwinn Unit fire supervisor Pete Glover. “One of my favorite parts about our Smokey Bear appearances is seeing a grandparent who is just as excited about having their picture taken with Smokey as their grandchild is.”
With the busy and complicated lives parents lead today, Glover said he recognizes that Smokey’s presence is vital to the positive reception of the many educational programs fire officers give each year.

“It would be difficult to get parents to come to an evening or weekend program if their kids weren’t interested in attending as well,” he said. “Smokey holds the attention of the younger audience members, giving us time to really drive the wildfire prevention message home to the parents and other adults in the audience.”
With the help of DNR fire officers and volunteers around the state, Smokey Bear makes more than 100 public appearances annually, including National Night Out public safety events, where he is typically swarmed with visitors hoping to get a hug, high-five and photo with Smokey. And when they leave an event, Smokey’s fans don’t only have smiles on their faces—they also leave with their hands full of educational “Smokey swag” promoting the fire prevention message.

“Smokey is the linchpin that made fire prevention popular nationwide and in Michigan,” Kollmeyer said. “Without our use of his image, slogans, voice and presence, I am not sure we would have such an educated public when it comes to wildfire awareness and prevention. I hope in 70 years, fire programs around the country will be celebrating Smokey Bear’s 140th birthday.”
Those interested in helping to celebrate Smokey’s 70th birthday this weekend can join the DNR at Orchard Beach State Park in Manistee or Van Riper State Park in Marquette County for cake and festivities (for event details, visit www.michigan.gov/dnrcalendar).
The Michigan Natural Resources Commission will also recognize Smokey’s milestone birthday with a special presentation at its Thursday, Aug. 14, meeting in Munising. For more information about Smokey Bear and to see campaign posters and other images from the past 70 years, visit www.smokeybear.org. To learn more about the DNR’s fire program and fire prevention in Michigan, visit www.michigan.gov/preventwildfires; to request Smokey’s presence at a community or school event, contact the DNR fire officer in your area.

 

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Back to School Bites

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Family Features

 

When it comes to packing lunches and after school snacks for your little ones, it’s easy to get into a rut. But by making a few delicious and convenient choices in the grocery store, you can break away from the same old sandwich routine and serve up nibbles and noshes your kids will love.

Whether your star pupils prefer a savory dip, a light and salty snack or a chewy fruit bar, here are a few great choices you can pack.

 

B2S-popcornPop Up Some Fun

For back-to-school snacking, you can’t beat popcorn. Pop up a bowl and let the fun flavor creations begin — sweet, savory or with just a dash of salt. Popcorn is a grab-n-go treat that takes minutes to make. Plus, it’s whole grain and contains fiber to fuel the body and keep you feeling fuller longer than other snacks. This beloved treat is also economical, costing mere pennies per serving. For more information, visit www.popcorn.org.

 

 

B2S-sabraDip It Up

For a quick burst of flavor at home or on the go, try Sabra Classic Singles with veggies, pita bread, pita chips or crackers. These 2-ounce servings of creamy Classic Hummus are perfect for the lunchbox or on-the-go snacking and portable enough to bring along on any adventure. For more information, visit www.sabra.com.

 

B2S-fig-barFuel Their Day

Help them have a great day at school by serving those little learners the proper fuel. With a commitment to creating all natural snacks you can feel good about giving your kids, Nature’s Bakery Fig Bars are cholesterol free, dairy free and kosher. From the sweetness of Blueberry to the tartness of Lemon, these bars are available in a variety of jam-packed, fruity flavors. For more information, visit www.naturesbakery.com.

 

B2S-yogurtServe a Satisfying Snack

Do you need an easy way to pack more protein, calcium and other nutrients into your family’s diet? You can’t go wrong with a kid-friendly kitchen staple like low-fat yogurt. With a wide array of textures, consistencies and flavors, there are sure to be several varieties that even the pickiest eater will enjoy. Take these beloved flavors to new heights with toppings such as dried fruit, organic granola, dark chocolate and coconut shavings.

 

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Make Summer Fitness Fun

HEA-fitness-fun1(Family Features) For most people, there is typically one main motivator for wanting to get in shape for the warmer weather months — they want to fit into the smaller, more revealing clothing of the season.

Whether it’s a new swimsuit they’d like to purchase in a smaller size or they just want last year’s shorts to fit more comfortably, getting a beach-ready body can often seem unattainable. But summer boasts an abundance of outdoor activities that take away the “chore” of getting in shape. Focus on the fun of the season, and before you know it, you will be fitting into your favorite summer wardrobe staples.

“Now that the weather is warmer, people are outside training more,” said KT Tape Founder Jim Jenson. “It is important to have the proper training gear and equipment to avoid injury.”

Go take a hike

Nothing allows you to take in the peace and tranquility of nature more than a long hike. This summer, incorporate many long hikes into your weekly routine and build up your endurance with this beneficial cardio exercise. Check with your county and state parks for trails and expand on your hiking skills, advancing in difficulty levels and length as the season progresses.

What it works: Hiking engages the quadriceps, hamstrings, calves and gluts. This activity also strengthens your abdominal core, especially while carrying a heavy pack.

 

Break a sweat, courtside

All you need to increase your heart rate is a basketball and an empty court at the local park or school playground. Practice shooting, normal dribbling, dribbling while doing sit-ups and dribbling behind the back of your legs. Make it a weekly event to gather for a game with friends and you’ll forget you are even working out.

What it works: Basketball can be a full-body workout, but it mainly targets your triceps, shoulders, biceps and pectoral muscles.

 

Go for a swim

While the summer days often bring about occasions to relax by the pool, there’s no reason not to jump right in. Take refuge from the sun’s heat and burn calories at the same time by swimming. This exercise is a top choice for those with physical limitations or who find simple cardio activities — such as walking, hiking or jogging — difficult or painful.

What it works: Swimming works all major muscles groups, especially the shoulders, abdominals, legs, hips and back.

 

When the weather warms up and spending hours at the gym sounds less appealing, give a few of these fun activities a try. For more fitness tips, visit www.elivingtoday.com.

 

HEA-fitness-fun2Take care of your muscles

By engaging in a workout routine, you’ve already proven that you care for your body. But do you have a care plan for the muscles that take you to your next level of fitness? Here are some ways to keep those hard working muscles in top shape so you can give it your all at every workout.

 

•Warm up and cool down

Regardless of the sport or activity you pursue, it’s always best to ease into it slowly and build your endurance as you go. Warming up can include light jogging, walking or performing the activity at a very slow pace. At the end of your routine, be sure to lightly stretch out each major muscle group you worked.

 

•Have a backup plan

In case of injury, always have a reliable pain relief and support product on hand, such as KT Tape, an elastic sports and fitness tape designed for muscle, ligament and tendon pain relief and support. It’s lightweight, comfortable to wear and can be used on many common injuries, such as lower back pain, knee pain, shin splints and tennis elbow. For more information, visit www.kttape.com.

 

•Listen to your body

If you should experience any sharp or sudden pains while exercising, don’t ignore the warning signs. Working out through the pain may make a small injury much worse. As a general rule, if it feels wrong, stop the workout.

 

•Engage in various activities

A body involved in different exercises will call on different muscle groups. This type of cross training prevents overly stressing one area of muscle.

 

•Allow the body to rest

In order to achieve the maximum benefit of your workout, your muscles need proper nourishment. This means sleep is extremely important, but it also means resting for a few days in between workouts. A proper rest period will give muscles time to heal.

 

Today’s trends in fitness

For those who long for a little variety in their fitness routine, here are some new trends taking shape — for indoors and outdoors — that may be just what you need to take your fitness to the next level.

• Body weight training

This new trend in fitness works by using your own body weight as resistance, which can help you shape muscles, tone, increase flexibility and ultimately, burn fat.

• High intensity interval training

This routine is great for those who are short on time, requiring extreme exertion in short intervals followed by a shorter recovery time.

• Yoga by air

Yoga’s newest offering is called aerial or antigravity yoga, which combines classic yoga moves with acrobatics; all while being suspended in the air from a hammock.

 

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Getting the most out of farmers markets and seasonal produce

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(BPT) – Warm weather months bring an abundance of fresh fruit and vegetables, and for those who enjoy buying local, farmers markets are popular destinations. Produce choices available at farmers markets are now reaching their peak. So how can you make the most of this seasonal bounty?

Chef Daniel Reyes, culinary faculty member at The Art Institute of California – Inland Empire, a campus of Argosy University, believes that it’s important to know the difference between buzz words common at markets.

“If you have questions about how farmers do something, they are more than happy to talk to you and educate you about sustainable and organic farming,” he says.

Reyes explains that while some produce may look unfamiliar, a good market salesperson will provide tips on how to use the items. Farmers markets are not just great places to buy, they’re also great places to learn new culinary techniques and food pairings.

Another tip? Shop early—that’s when chefs at are the markets. “Chefs are usually there early in the morning. See what they are buying,” says Reyes. And remember to bring bags to carry your items home—cooler bags are especially helpful when you’re buying delicate goods such as locally made cheeses, eggs or meats.

A sense of community

Farmers markets allow people to gather in a common place to meet neighbors and make friends who share a passion for locally grown food. The markets build a sense of community, according to Reyes, that contributes to a stronger local economy and smaller environmental footprint.

“Get to know your purveyors. See where they come from,” Reyes advocates.

This sentiment is shared by Chef Elizabeth Thompson, culinary arts faculty member at The Art Institute of California—Inland Empire. Thompson recommends asking farmers what’s best to buy right now.

“They grow whatever they sell, which makes them experts. Ask to put be put on their email list. They may send out information about what is in season and what to do with it,” she adds.

Thompson makes it a point to try something new each time she visits a farmers market. “Sample everything! That is how the farmers sell their products, and you will know what you like.”

CSA – Community Supported Agriculture

In addition to visiting the farmers market, many people are choosing to become CSA shareholders, paying in advance for weekly boxes of produce.

CSAs create a direct relationship between farmer and consumer, according to Thompson. CSAs allow busy people to pick up their share boxes at a convenient location, and teach them how to use what’s inside.

For those interested in supporting local farmers, CSAs provide a critical influx of cash to farmers during the off season, helping them to better prepare for the planting season ahead.

Whether shopping weekly at the farmers market or picking up a CSA box of fresh produce, buying local allows consumers to taste fruit and vegetables at their peak flavor. From striped heirloom tomatoes to strawberries picked fresh just hours before, farm fresh foods provide a burst of flavor and a connection to the community that cannot be found within a large supermarket.

 

The Art Institute of California – Inland Empire, a campus of Argosy University, is one of The Art Institutes, a system of over 50 schools throughout North America. 

 

 

 

 

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