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What’s “bugging” you in our streams?

OUT-Stream-Insect-Monitoring-web

In many cases we think bugs are a nuisance, but bugs in a stream can be very useful.  Stream insects are a good measure of water quality.  Unlike fish, stream insects cannot move around much so they are less able to escape the effects of sediment and other pollutants that diminish water quality. Stream insects can also be easily identified.

Trout Unlimited National, Cannon Township and Michigan Trout Unlimited will be holding a Stream Insect Monitoring Event on Saturday, May 2, 2015 from 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. at the Rockford Community Cabin – 220 North Monroe Street in Rockford.  Volunteers will be assigned to a monitoring group with a team leader.  Each group will collect and identify insects from different stream sites in the Rogue River and Bear Creek watersheds. You don’t need any experience with stream insects to participate and all ages are welcome.

What will you need? Please RSVP to Nichol De Mol at 231-557-6362 or ndemol@tu.org if you would like to attend. Lunch will be provided for all volunteers.  Please bring waders if you have them and dress for the weather conditions.

Posted in Featured, OutdoorsComments (0)

New hope for kids battling kidney disease

 

Researchers are optimistic that new study pinpointing some of the reasons kidney disease progresses to kidney failure in children could eventually keep many kids off dialysis and transplant lists. Photo credit: Irvin Calicut/Wikimedia Commons.

Researchers are optimistic that new study pinpointing some of the reasons kidney disease progresses to kidney failure in children could eventually keep many kids off dialysis and transplant lists. Photo credit: Irvin Calicut/Wikimedia Commons.

By Mona Shand, Michigan News Connection

New hope is on the horizon for children suffering from chronic kidney disease, thanks to the results of a study that, for the first time, identifies some of the factors that can lead to kidney failure.

Dr. Bradley Warady was the co-principal investigator on the study, which looked at nearly 500 children with chronic kidney disease over 10 years.

Warady says many people don’t realize that kidney disease can have a profound effect on a child’s growth and development.

“Not only can you develop an inability to remove waste products and fluids, but you may be very short, you may have poor nutrition, you may have poor growth,” he explains. “So it impacts the global development of the child.”

Warady adds the risk factors investigators uncovered, including high blood pressure anemia, and protein loss, are treatable, and the hope is that addressing those issues will keep kidney disease from progressing so that children can avoid having to go through dialysis or even transplants.

Warady points out chronic kidney disease is not as common in children as it is in adults, but it can be much more challenging to treat.

He says the good news is that many of the underlying issues investigators uncovered can be successfully managed.

“If we can do that, maybe, I can’t say for sure yet, but maybe we have a chance of altering the progression or the worsening of chronic kidney disease,” he says.

The study, which was funded by the National Institutes of Health, is published in National Kidney Foundation’s American Journal of Kidney Diseases.

Posted in Featured, HealthComments (0)

Raising of America 

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Community screening scheduled for documentary 

From the Kent County Health Dept.

We all want what is best for our children. We live in the richest country in the world. So why does child well-being in the U.S. rank 26 out of 29 rich countries? Why do we as a country allow our most vulnerable children to fall so much further behind?

The Kent County Health Department is teaming up with Strong Beginnings, First Steps, Great Start Collaborative, Family Futures, Healthy Kent, K-Connect, Early Learning Neighborhood Collaborative, MomsBloom, and I Believe, I Become/Baby Scholars, in an effort to educate the public about the challenges of raising children in our diverse community. We are planning two screenings of “Raising of America,” a documentary that explores how a strong start for all our kids leads not only to better individual learning, earning, and mental and physical health, but also to a healthier, safer, better educated, more prosperous, and more equitable America.

Raising of America is an hour-long episode that “interweaves the latest discoveries from neuroscience with the stories of families and communities doing all they can to provide the nurturing environments all babies and young children need to thrive.” The documentary examines how social conditions affect childhood development.

“Issues of poverty, race, education, environment, safety and employment all have an impact on childhood development,” said Adam London, Administrative Health Officer of the Kent County Health Department. “We need to create policies across all sectors—housing, labor, transportation, health, early childhood, etc.—in order to reduce inequities and give all children a level playing field. Finding successes today can improve the quality of life for our children and future generations.”

Join us for the Raising of America Screening and Community Conversation on Thursday, April 16, 2015, at 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., and 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. at Celebration! Cinema South, 1506 Eastport Dr. SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49508.

Register for the screening and conversation going to www.eventbrite.com and searching for Raising of America. Learn more about the documentary series at www.raisingofamerica.org.

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, FeaturedComments (0)

Chiropractor building demolished

 

The building at 44 N. Main can be seen on the corner, with the awning. A sign on the side says “Joe’s dependable service.” This photo was taken in the 1930s, during the street paving project. Courtesy of the Cedar Springs Historical Society.

The building at 44 N. Main can be seen on the corner, with the awning. A sign on the side says “Joe’s dependable service.” This photo was taken in the 1930s, during the street paving project. Courtesy of the Cedar Springs Historical Society.

 This photo from 1977 shows 44 N. Main next to the Log Cabin restaurant. Courtesy of the Cedar Springs Historical Society.

This photo from 1977 shows 44 N. Main next to the Log Cabin restaurant. Courtesy of the Cedar Springs Historical Society.

By Judy Reed

Another building that was built in the 1880s was torn down Wednesday, after being vacant for two years.

The building at 44 N. Main, last known as Dr. Robinson’s Chiropractic office, was bought in a tax foreclosure sale by builder Duane McIntyre last August. McIntyre, who is also a member of the Community Building Development Team, said his original intention was to remodel the building. But he found it was too rotted to save. “Once we got through the gutting process, it was just too rotten—the floors, the walls, the roof, and it reeked of mold,” he said.

The building at 44 N. Main was demolished on Wednesday, March 18, 2015.

The building at 44 N. Main was demolished on Wednesday, March 18, 2015.

The original building on the site on the southeast corner of Elm and Main, is believed to have burned in the great Black Friday fire of 1884. This building was built sometime after that. A photo from the 1970s shows the year on the front of the building—1880-something.

According to Sharon Jett of the Cedar Springs Historical Society, it was Bradis Harness Shop in the late 1800s, and then in the early 1900s, it was a shoe cobbler shop run by Roy Marvin. Other businesses located in the building over the years include Polly Prapp’s Watch Repair, Joe’s Dependable Service (see front page photo), and a bakery and dairy bar, according to a sign on the side of the building.

McIntyre bought the building with his business, Duane McIntyre Build-Design LLC. He also built and is selling the condos behind the White Pine Medical offices. But he’s not sure yet what will happen with the lot at 44 N. Main. He said if he doesn’t sell it, he would build on it. “I just want to help make Cedar Springs look nicer,” he explained. “I’m just a residential builder trying to make Cedar Springs a better place. It’s a great town, and I’m always trying to make it better.”

Thanks to Sharon Jett and The Cedar Springs Historical Society for their photos and info on this building. They are putting together a book on the businesses on Main Street and some of the side streets, and would appreciate any info or photos residents have of the businesses that have come and gone. Call the museum at 696-3335. They are open Wednesdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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Solon votes to tear down barn

Photo by Len Allington

Photo by Len Allington

sw-riconcBy Judy Reed

The Solon Township board voted 4-1 on Tuesday, March 10, to remove the old horse barn, referred to as the Stout barn, which sits behind the Township Hall, at 15185 Algoma Avenue.

Board member John Rideout made the motion to authorize and direct the Supervisor to facilitate removal of the barn, by the most economical means possible.

The barn has been a bone of contention since the Township bought the property. They originally investigated putting money into it for the new township hall, but decided to build after finding out what needed to be done.

The barn has been used for the flea market portion of the Solon farmer and flea market in the past, and this past winter was used for storage of RVs.

In 2012, Solon appointed five residents to the Solon Parks Committee, to create a master plan for the location. According to Len Allington, a member of the committee and vocal proponent of keeping the barn, the committee’s view is that “If it was sitting on anyone else’s property, it would be worth $100,000,” he said. “Their view (the board’s) is that it isn’t worth anything and they’d do anything to get rid of it.”

A survey done by the committee received 140 responses on what they would like to see in the property. 94 said they would like committee to look at potential uses for the buildings and the long term cost, and 49 said they wanted the buildings to stay and be restored and utilized.

The roof of the barn was damaged in the straight line winds that whipped through the area last April. The insurance paid them $16,000, but would pay out another $27,500 if they replaced it.

Allington said there are people that are interested in using it. He said that they could continue to use it for storage for boats and RVs without any code upgrade. He also thinks they can get the roof repaired for the amount of the insurance payout. However, he said if code upgrades are made, along with the roof being repaired, they could use the barn for other things such as indoor farmers market on bad weather days; a group has shown interest in using the barn as a site for canine agility performances, clinics and seminars; another for 4H events; an indoor archery range, indoor golf driving range, and more.

Solon Supervisor Bob Ellick was the lone no vote. But the no vote doesn’t mean he is against it. “I didn’t know the motion was coming, and I wasn’t ready to vote on it that night,” explained Ellick. “Something needs to be done with it—it needs hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of work done,” he said. “Even if gets remodeled, it’s in the wrong place. I fought that when the Township Hall was going to be built; I thought it should’ve been in a different spot. But I can’t change it. I’m not horribly opposed to the board’s decision,” he explained.

Right now he is looking at public auction to sell the barn. However, if the committee’s contractor comes through with a bid to fix the roof, they will listen to it, he said. Ellick thinks restoring the barn could cost up to $500,000. “I don’t think the majority of the people would be enthused about us putting public money into it,” he noted.

Ellick thinks they could be build something smaller, lower to the ground, more economical, and more energy efficient for the same price. He said he would probably have some more ideas on the public auction by the next meeting.

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Catholic Church breaks ground on addition

Some of the children also participated in breaking ground on the addition at St. John Paul II Catholic Church, in Cedar Springs. Photos courtesy of Sue Wolfe.

Some of the children also participated in breaking ground on the addition at St. John Paul II Catholic Church, in Cedar Springs. Photos courtesy of Sue Wolfe.

Some of the children also participated in breaking ground on the addition at St. John Paul II Catholic Church, in Cedar Springs. Photos courtesy of Sue Wolfe.

Some of the children also participated in breaking ground on the addition at St. John Paul II Catholic Church, in Cedar Springs. Photos courtesy of Sue Wolfe.

Father Lam Le, pastor of Saint John Paul II Church, held a ground breaking and blessing with several parishioners present on Wednesday, March 11.

The approximately 1,500 square-foot addition and a 24-feet x 32-feet pole barn are planned for the two-year-old Catholic church, currently serving over 290 families. This is just the first phase of a much bigger master plan for the location at 3110 17 Mile Road, just west of Meijer in Cedar Springs. The addition will serve as classrooms for the growing numbers of students and adults involved with religious education. The project is expected to be completed by midsummer.

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The Post travels to the Bahamas

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Photo taken aboard the cruise ship Disney Dream.

 

The Post traveled to the Bahamas in early February with Jeremy and Brooke Robinson and their family. “The kids even got to miss a week of school,” said Brooke. “We traveled on Disney’s newest cruise boat, The Disney Dream. It was gorgeous! It was 70 and no snow! Who could ask for more than that?”

During the cruise they traveled to Castaway Cay (Disney’s private island) where they hung out on the beach and played in the ocean’s aqua blue water all day. They also went to Nassau, Bahamas where they got to swim and do tricks with the Dolphins in the Blue Lagoon.

“It was an incredible trip for our three kids, Jaxen Robinson, 6, Trentyn Roelofs, 11, and Alyssa Roelofs, 15,” said Brooke. “They are already asking when can we go back?”

Thank you Robinsons, for taking us with you!

Are you going on vacation? Take the Post with you and snap some photos. Then send them to us with some info to news@cedarspringspost.com or mail them to Post travels, PO Box 370, Cedar Springs, MI 49319. We will be looking for yours!

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Crocuses are blooming

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The warm weather we had over the weekend and Monday has tricked a few flowers into blooming. Mary Lou Fuller, of Solon Township, took this photo of crocuses blooming in her yard. It sure is a sight for sore eyes! Springs is on the way!

Thanks, Mary Lou, for sending in your photo!

We’d like to see your flower photos. Please send them to news@cedarspringspost.com, with some information about the photo.

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ICCF home in need of volunteers

Post photo by J. Reed

Post photo by J. Reed

By Judy Reed

The lot at 40 E. Maple is once again the site of a family home.

The previous home, which had been turned into apartments, was destroyed in a fire five years ago. The lot sat vacant until January, when Inner City Christian Federation began building a home on it. ICCF, which is similar to Habitat for Humanity, builds homes for those in need. Their mission is to “provide housing opportunities and services that encourage family responsibility and independence, thereby helping to build stable communities.”

The three-bedroom, two-story home is similar to others in the area. Don Fredricks, Construction Volunteer and Special Projects Coordinator, said that roof inspections should be done this week, and that they would be drywalling and insulating the inside. After that, they will need volunteers to step forward to help finish the project. “We will need trim carpenters in two to three weeks, and painters,” said Fredricks.

Anyone who would like to volunteer their services should call Fredricks at (616) 262-8863.

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5th Grader is Awarded in Rotary Essay Contest

CTA-RotaryEssayContest

One of CTA’s fifth graders has a lot to be proud of; he was one of 280 students from the Cedar Springs area to be picked for the Cedar Springs Rotary Club’s annual essay contest. Jacob Borden was awarded fourth place for his essay about his grandma. The essay contest’s theme asked participants to write about someone they feel is a responsible person. Jacob chose to write about his grandma and the reasons why he feels that she is responsible. “My grandma is outdoorsy, she walks every day. She goes to church and she hand-makes baby blankets for her church’s pantry.” He beamed as he spoke of his grandma, “I really respect my grandma.”

Jacob was awarded a $10 bill; he received a certificate and had a catered lunch with the Cedar Springs Rotary Club this past Wednesday. “We had tacos,” was Jacob’s response when asked about the lunch. During the lunch, Jacob had to read his essay to everyone at the lunch including his mom, grandma, teacher, Mrs. Norman, and his Dean of Students, Mr. Oldebekking, “I was nervous,” Jacob said. Any fifth grader would have been had he or she been in his shoes! CTA has a lot to be proud of in this young Charger. Way to go, Jacob!

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