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Equestrian team heads to regionals

Senior Bayley Wolfe and her horse Joe, ready for their turn in Western Fitting & Showing.

Senior Bayley Wolfe and her horse Joe, ready for their turn in Western Fitting & Showing.

The Cedar Springs High School Equestrian Team battled with Rockford the past two weekends at the MIHA District 5 Meets. At the first meet, the Red Hawks had a wonderful showing, beating the Rams by 10 points (174-164). The second meet was a dead tie (151-151), and Rockford edged out Cedar Springs by 2 points (155-157) at the third meet. However, scores are cumulative and Cedar Springs won the District trophy by 8 points. The Red Hawks will head to Regional competition in Midland, Sept. 26-28.

Senior Bayley Wolfe had a great meet 1 and 2, winning 7 of her 16 classes and not placing below 4th place in the rest. Seniors Courtney Piatt and Nicole Kaupa also boosted the team’s score with very consistent placings. Speed riders Jesseka Ruiter and Jordan Stevens helped keep the Red Hawks on top, especially at Meet 3.

From L-R: Asst. Coach Kylie Piatt, Jordan Stevens, Head Coach Emily Ream, Jesseka Ruiter, Nicole Kaupa, Katherine Krankall, Courtney Piatt, Logan Amelia, Emilee Pastoor, Asst. Coach Liz Gear, Bayley Wolfe, Ashlee Warlick, Ashley Pohl, Asst. Coach Danni Naffziger, Raine Gregware.  

From L-R: Asst. Coach Kylie Piatt, Jordan Stevens, Head Coach Emily Ream, Jesseka Ruiter, Nicole Kaupa, Katherine Krankall, Courtney Piatt, Logan Amelia, Emilee Pastoor, Asst. Coach Liz Gear, Bayley Wolfe, Ashlee Warlick, Ashley Pohl, Asst. Coach Danni Naffziger, Raine Gregware.  

Coach Emily Ream had this to say about her team: “We had a great Meet 1 and 2, struggled a little bit at Meet 3. The weather at Meet 3 was cold and super muddy, so the team and their horses had to trudge through some nasty muck. I’m very proud of all of our riders! They kept a great attitude all day, trying new classes, as I needed them. One of our freshmen, Emilee Pastoor, was thrown in a totally new discipline and kept a smile on her face the whole time. That’s what it means to take one for the team! We are very excited for Regionals!”

Ream offered special thanks to coaches Danni Naffziger, Liz Gear and Kylie Piatt, and said the team would also like to thank Lisa Taylor for all her generosity toward the team.

 

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What problem would you solve for tomorrow?

Students and teachers across the country will tackle critical issues using science, technology, engineering and math to win prizes for their schools.

Students and teachers across the country will tackle critical issues using science, technology, engineering and math to win prizes for their schools.

(NAPS)—Students and teachers in public schools are racing to solve problems that can exist in many communities across the country—such as water pollution and street safety—and they’re doing it with $2 million on the line. The nationwide Samsung Solve for Tomorrow Contest is helping students engage in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) through community-based learning—by taking topics out of traditional classroom settings and exploring, in a hands-on way, how they address issues that affect their lives.

To enter, visit www.samsung.com/solve by October 31.

From the applicant pool, 255 state finalists will be selected, then 51 state winners (representing all 50 states and Washington, D.C.) will be announced. Fifteen national finalists will present their projects to judges, and five grand prize winners will be selected by public online voters, judges and Samsung employees.

In total, approximately $2 million in prizes will be given throughout the competition. To learn more, visit www.samsung.com/solve.

 

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CTA Parent Association Donates $3,000 to Gymnasium Fund!

CTA-Parent-Association-donates

The CTA Parent Association of 2013-14, under the leadership of April Hirsch and Amy Miner, donated $3,000 toward the CTA Gymnasium Fund. Mrs. Hirsch and Mrs. Miner are pictured with members of the 2014-15 Parent Association, Jen Fulkerson, Audrey Hoops, and Shannon Maier.

 

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Man killed in Spencer Township

Silent Observer offers $2,000 reward for information

Lincoln Lake Ave. and Pinewood St. was were Luttrell was found in the roadway with multiple wounds.

Lincoln Lake Ave. and Pinewood St. was were Luttrell was found in the roadway with multiple wounds.

Brent Luttrell

Brent Luttrell

A 34-year-old Gowen man was murdered early Monday morning in Spencer Township.

The Kent County Sheriff Department said that the victim, Brent Luttrell, 34 years old, was sleeping at his home at 12849 Pinewood N.E., when three armed masked males entered the residence about 1 a.m. Luttrell immediately ran outside and was confronted by at least one of the suspects. He was then forced into a red passenger vehicle with a loud muffler (driven by a fourth person) and transported to the area of Lincoln Lake and Pinewood, where he was later found in the roadway with multiple wounds. Luttrell was transported to Spectrum Health Butterworth, where he died as a result of his injuries.

An autopsy was conducted and it was determined Luttrell died from multiple gunshot and stab wounds.

Police reported there were three other adults in the residence (one male and two females) and a juvenile male. The adult male, reported to be a cousin of Luttrell, received facial injuries and was treated and released from the hospital.

Luttrell was paroled from prison in April, after serving a year (on a plea deal) on one count of delivery and manufacturing of marijuana, and one count of conspiracy to manufacture and deliver marijuana. Prior to that he served 14 years in prison, from 1998-2012 for multiple charges, including kidnapping, escape, safe breaking, home invasion 2nd degree, and weapons-larceny. Police have not commented on whether they think this crime is related to his criminal past.

Anyone with information is asked to call the Kent County Sheriff Department at 616-336-3113 or Silent Observer at 616-774-2345. Silent Observer will pay a reward of up to $2,000 if your tip information leads to the arrest of those responsible for Luttrell’s death.

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The Post travels to China

N-Post-travels-to-China-Waite1-webN-Post-travels-to-China-Waite2-Polo-Action-webRecently the Post traveled to Tianjin China, with Thomas Waite, a 2013 graduate of Cedar Springs High School. Thomas and the Harvard Polo Team played in the Metropolitan Intervarsity Polo Tournament against Yale, Stanford, Oxford, Cambridge and London U. The trip also included cultural exchange forums, tours and youth polo coaching sessions.

Thank you, Thomas, for taking us with you!

Are you going on vacation? Take the Post with you and snap some photos. Then send them to us with some info to news@cedarspringspost.com or mail them to Post travels, PO Box 370, Cedar Springs, MI 49319. We will be looking for yours!

 

 

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Hometown Hero

Alexander Hemry

Alexander Hemry

Alexander Hemry, a graduate of Cedar Springs High School class of 2011, recently completed Basic Training at Lackland AFB. Alexander graduated as part of the 323 Squadron flight 208, on March 28 and 29. He completed his advanced training on August 28 and is now known as Airman 1st Class (A1C) Hemry. He has been assigned to the 1st Special Operations Wing, aboard AC-130U Spooky II Gunship and will be stationed out of Hurlburt Field, FL.

Hemry is the son of Don and Jeannine Hemry, of Cedar Springs.

The Hemry family says, “Congratulations Alexander, we are very proud of you!”

N-Hometown-Hero-Hemry-Alex2-web

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Read to ride

Mrs. Kate Norman’s 5th grade class

Mrs. Kate Norman’s 5th grade class

Mrs. Kate Norman’s 5th grade class walked to the Cedar Springs Library on Monday, September 8, for their back-to-school library orientation and to get their Read-to-Ride reading logs.

Students were delighted to find out that by reading only 6 hours they could earn two free tickets to ride two carnival rides on Red Flannel Day, compliments of Elliott’s  Amusements, in partnership with the Cedar Springs Library and the Red Flannel  Festival. Logs were also sent electronically to area schools, charter schools, private schools and home schooling families.

All area Red Flannel town citizens and fans, grades K-8, are invited to drop by the Library to get a log or print one from the Library’s website: cedarspringslibrary.org.

It’s a royal salute to 75 years of volunteers! Get your students to join the red reading challenge this year. Logs can be cashed in at the Cedar Springs Public Library during open hours or on Red Flannel Day between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.  at the Friends of the Library’s big book sale across the street from the Kent Theatre. Have you REaD a good book lately?

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Changing course: a second degree and second career 

Debbie Robles, recipient of the Hospice of Michigan Second Degree-Second Career Nursing Scholarship, prepares for her nurse licensure exam and a new career in hospice and palliative care.

Debbie Robles, recipient of the Hospice of Michigan Second Degree-Second Career Nursing Scholarship, prepares for her nurse licensure exam and a new career in hospice and palliative care.

Debbie Robles was drawn to the nursing profession at a young age. She recalls dressing as a nurse for career day in elementary school, and also caring for her sick grandmother and great-aunt as a young adult. But as an 18-year-old college student, a nursing degree just wasn’t something she could pursue.

“I paid my way through college and had to work several jobs to pay the bills,” Robles explains. “The nursing program required a lot of time, homework and use of a car that I didn’t have. Instead I chose to pursue a math degree. Math always came easy to me, and I knew it wouldn’t be as time intensive, allowing me to work more.”

Robles graduated from Franciscan University with a bachelor’s degree in math along with a teaching endorsement. She went on to lead a successful career teaching middle school and high school and even working as an adjunct math professor at Grand Valley State University.

Eventually, Robles decided to put her teaching career on hold while she and her husband started a family. Five children and 11 years later, Robles was ready to go back to work and found herself back in the classroom where she intended to take a couple biology classes to keep up her teaching certificate and to expand the subjects she could teach. That’s when the stars began to align for her and a career in hospice and palliative care began taking shape.

“As I started to talk with other students in my class, I learned that GVSU offered an accelerated second-degree nursing program, and the two classes I was taking were both prerequisites for the degree,” Robles says. “I went home that night and told my husband ‘This is what I want to do.’”

GVSU’s second-degree nursing program is offered through its Kirkhof College of Nursing and targeted toward individuals who have earned a bachelor’s degree or higher from an accredited college or university and wish to pursue a bachelor of science in nursing. Students are admitted to the full-time, 15-month program once per year, applying in January for a May start.

By the end of her first semester back in college, Robles had made her decision to pursue the nursing degree when she learned her 69-year-old father was diagnosed with late-stage sarcoma. With no treatment options available, her father died within weeks of diagnosis.

“As I reflected on this experience with my dad, it struck me that in the health courses I’d been taking, the focus was on treatment and saving lives. No one talked about death and what to do when treatment wasn’t available,” Robles recalls. “Death is inevitable, but it’s something nobody wants to talk about.”

Shortly after her father died, Robles learned that Hospice of Michigan offered a Second Degree-Second Career Nursing Scholarship through GVSU. Responding to a shortage of nursing students interested in end-of-life care, HOM established the scholarship in 2009 to provide the funds and the opportunity for students like Robles to change their career path.

“I was amazed when I found out about the scholarship program,” Robles said. “Not only did I stumble across the second-degree nursing program, but then I found out there is a scholarship available for the exact type of medicine I had recently decided I wanted to go into. I knew then that hospice and palliative care is what I was meant to do.”

With funding provided by HOM, the scholarship, which was created to nurture future registered nurses in the field of hospice and palliative care, awards recipients full tuition, a stipend and a nursing residency with HOM that provides first-hand experience. After the student graduates and passes the licensure exam, he or she will enter into a two-year agreement to work as a full-time nurse for HOM.

“Since many students study nursing right after high school, the idea of a career in palliative care doesn’t interest them,” said Dr. Michael Paletta, executive director of the Hospice of Michigan Institute. “Offering the Second Degree-Second Career scholarship to those seeking nursing as a career change later in life allows HOM to reach students who may be more interested and comfortable with a career in hospice and palliative care. Scholarship recipients will receive top-notch training both in the classroom and in the field. To date, we have given three scholarships and have nursing students practicing around the state.”

Robles applied and was delighted to be selected as the 2013 scholarship recipient. She graduated from GVSU’s nursing program this summer and is currently studying for her licensure exam.

“The first-hand experience I’ve had working with HOM through my education has reassured me that this was the profession I was meant to be in,” Robles says. “I’m very excited to begin my new career and couldn’t be happier that it’s with Hospice of Michigan.”

For more information about Hospice of Michigan and its Second Degree-Second Career Nursing Scholarship visit www.hom.org.

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Red Hawks roll over Sparta in second week showdown 44-6

The Red Hawk Defense hard at work in Sparta. Photo By Kelly Alvesteffer.

The Red Hawk Defense hard at work in Sparta. Photo By Kelly Alvesteffer.

Mother Nature proved to be the only thing that could slow down Coach Gus Kapolka’s Red Hawks football team on Friday night, Sept. 5, in Sparta. After a one-hour rain delay, the Red Hawk offense, led by senior Captain Zach Wamser, with two touchdowns and a solid game plan, proved to be too much for the Sparta Spartans, who managed a playoff run in the 2013 season. MavRick Cotton, Taylor VanDyke, Anthony Topolski and Connor Willits all found the end zone throughout the game, as the Red Hawks executed their strategy.

As the offense rolled and skies threatened more rain, the Red Hawk defense controlled the Spartans with a relentless stranglehold that was led by Anthony Topolski’s nine tackles and nine tackle assists, with 18 Red Hawk defenders registering at least one tackle in the stats column for the game, with five tackles for loss and two sacks being counted throughout the night, for the Cedar Springs D.

The special teams play, led by kicker Hunter Larsen, for the Red Hawks, also managed to keep the Spartans at bay, by only allowing 19 return yards, in six kick off opportunities.

The Spartans managed a touchdown late in the game, with Nick Yeck breaking free in the fourth quarter to put up six points for Sparta.

This week, the Red Hawks will host Belding at 7:00 p.m. Friday, Sept. 12. Please come out to beautiful Red Hawk stadium and support your Red Hawks!

 

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Fresh Market: Plums

Photo from michiganplum.org. Check out their website for more info on plums grown in Michigan and to find recipes.

Photo from michiganplum.org. Check out their website for more info on plums grown in Michigan and to find recipes.

By Vicky Babcock

Plums may have been one of the first fruits cultivated by humans. It appears to have several origins and varieties. Prunus domestica has been traced to East European and Caucasian mountains, while Prunus salicina and Prunus simonii originated in Asia. The remnants of plums were discovered in archaeological digs dating to the Neolihic age (Wikipedia).

A relative to peaches, nectarines and almonds, the plum is a member of the rose family. It is considered a drupe—a fruit with a stone pit surrounding their seeds. Plum trees blossom in the spring and a healthy tree will produce an abundant crop in late summer to early fall. Asian varieties can be harvested much earlier, sometimes as early as May.  China is the leading producer of plums, with the U.S. lagging a distant sixth. Of the 50 states, California leads in plum production.

The plum tree is featured significantly in Chinese mythology. It is associated with wisdom and longevity, and blossoms from the plum tree are frequently carved in jade to symbolize resurrection. It is often represented in Asian art and is included among “the three friends of winter” and “the four gentlemen,” traditional groupings of plants which often appear in artworks. The three friends—pine, bamboo and plum—are associated with strength and endurance during the cold winter months, while the four gentlemen—plum, orchid, bamboo and chrysanthemum—represent the seasons, as well as noble virtues.

Plum varieties range from sweet to tart and the skin can be somewhat tart. They are featured heavily in much Asian cuisine, while Americans are more likely to consume them in their natural state. Plums are a good source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin K, copper, fiber and potassium. With about 30 calories per fruit, plums are an excellent choice to round out your diet.

On a cautionary note, plums contain measurable amounts of oxalates. In heavy concentrations, these can crystallize and create health problems. Individuals with kidney or gallbladder conditions probably should avoid eating plums. If you have any concerns, please speak with your doctor.

Nana’s Plum Bread

1 to 1 ½ cups pitted, chopped plums

1 T. flour1 ½ cups flour

½ cup butter, softened½ tsp. salt

¾ cup sugar½ tsp. baking soda

2 tsp. vanilla extract¼ tsp. nutmeg

1 tsp. orange extract2 T. sour cream

2 large eggs2 T. brown sugar

Preheat oven to 350º F. Butter a 9×5-inch loaf pan and dust with about 1 tablespoon of white sugar. In a small bowl, sprinkle plums with 1 tablespoon flour. Toss lightly to coat; set aside.

In a large bowl, beat together butter, ¾ cup sugar and extracts. Add eggs and beat until fluffy. In a separate bowl, stir together remaining dry ingredients except for brown sugar. Add to egg mixture, stirring until mixture is smooth and dry ingredients are incorporated. Stir in sour cream. Fold plums into batter, then pour into prepared pan.  Sprinkle with brown sugar.

Bake in pre-heated oven for 50-55 minutes until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool 5-10 minutes before removing from pan. Cool on a wire rack.

Note: Baking times are approximate.

Fresh Market is brought to you by Solon Market located at 15185 Algoma Avenue.  For more information call 616-696-1718.  Like us on facebook for updates.

 

 

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