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DNR sees success in fall walleye stocking

A healthy fall walleye fingerling, reared in DNR ponds near Belmont in Kent County, is ready to be released into Crystal Lake in Montcalm County. Photo courtesty Michigan Department of Natural Resources.

A healthy fall walleye fingerling, reared in DNR ponds near Belmont in Kent County, is ready to be released into Crystal Lake in Montcalm County. Photo courtesty Michigan Department of Natural Resources.

Fall is harvest time in Michigan, and while most may be thinking of picking apples or plucking pumpkins, Michigan Department of Natural Resources fisheries crews are thinking about walleye.

Specifically, they’re collecting the last of the walleye fingerlings that are raised in rearing ponds for stocking and getting the fish to where they want them to be.

For the most part, walleye are reared for a short period of time in ponds and stocked as spring fingerlings—most at less than 2 inches in length—in high densities. But fisheries biologists know that fall fingerlings can be stocked at much lower densities and produce better results than spring fingerlings.

Volunteer members of the West Michigan Walleye Club lift a fyke net (a bag net for catching fish) of fingerlings out of a DNR walleye pond near Belmont in Kent County. Photo courtesy Michigan DNR.

Volunteer members of the West Michigan Walleye Club lift a fyke net (a bag net for catching fish) of fingerlings out of a DNR walleye pond near Belmont in Kent County. Photo courtesy Michigan DNR.

Recently, DNR technician supervisor Ed Pearce brought his crew (technicians Mike Wilson and Matt Smith) to the state’s walleye ponds near Belmont in Kent County to get the walleye out of the ponds and into a couple of southern Michigan lakes.

A dozen or so members of the West Michigan Walleye Club, who spent the summer babysitting the ponds, assisted the crew in the operation.

“We have found that if we put in fall fingerlings, their survival is very, very good,” said Jay Wesley, the DNR’s Lake Michigan Basin coordinator. “It’s really the key to stocking walleye in southern Michigan. We’ve done it with fry, but it’s really hit or miss.”

Although walleye are much in demand—anglers love them—most southern Michigan waters are not ideal for the fish, which prefer cooler water than most southern Michigan lakes maintain in the summer.

In addition, most lakes have established fish populations that predate heavily upon the tiny walleye. By stocking fall fingerlings, fisheries managers not only enjoy better fish survival but are also more likely to establish fishable walleye populations.

“If we can get a cool-water hatchery facility, our capacity to raise more fall fingerlings would increase,” Wesley said. “Right now, we’re kind of doing it experimentally, pond by pond, but we need a coordinated effort at one hatchery to really get it going.”

At some ponds, crews leave a percentage of the fish there after spring harvest to grow into fall fingerlings. At Belmont this year, production was so poor that fisheries managers decided to leave them all in the pond to grow until fall.

The operation at Belmont consists of three ponds—a fill pond, fed by a natural creek; the walleye pond; and a minnow pond, which is stocked early in the season with fathead minnows that will reproduce and provide forage for the walleye pond.

Members of the club tended the ponds all spring and summer. In spring, they fertilize the ponds to produce the plankton the fry need to survive.

“For six weeks, we put 500 to 600 pounds of fertilizer—a mixture of alfalfa and soy meal—into the ponds to provide the nutrients for the plankton,” said Al Davis, club director. “We started with 100 pounds of minnows in the minnow pond, and we produced more than 400 pounds of minnows this year—and we’ve still got minnows in there.

“We had more than 90 man-hours in just feeding fish and transferring the minnows from the minnow pond to the walleye pond.”

Fall harvest involves lowering the water level to congregate the fish more closely, then installing trap nets to collect them. It takes two days of water-lowering and net-setting to get the bulk of the fish.

Next, the remaining water is drained into what the guys call a “wolf trap”—a concrete and screen box below the pond’s discharge tube—where the remaining fish are entrapped and netted out.

“We’ll get 90 percent of the fish out with the nets, then we’ll seine the wolf trap,” Pearce said. “We’ll get all of those fish.”

Pond production is highly variable, depending largely on environmental factors over which no one has control. The poor production this spring led to a bonanza of fall fingerlings.

“It has been a good year this year,” Davis said, as he handled nets at the recent fingerling harvest. “In 2010, we had a bunch of fish, but a flood came through and blew the dike. The fish all wound up in the Grand River.

“But since 2009, this pond has produced more than 800,000 walleye fry.”

Raising fingerlings is costly and time-consuming. The club chipped in to help defray the cost of fertilizer and provided the bulk of the labor.

Pearce, who praised the club effusively, said the program would be nearly impossible without the club’s assistance.

“These fall fingerlings are worth their weight in gold,” Pearce said. “We use them in lakes that are full of bluegills; bluegills are good predators, so we put them in at a size that they’re not going to get eaten up.”

Fall fingerlings tend to measure 5 to 7 inches. It’ll take about two years for them to recruit into the fishery, when they become legal targets at 15 inches.

Schoolchildren from two nearby schools also attended the first day of the fall fingerling harvest.

For his part, Pearce said the fall fingerling harvest is one of his favorite tasks as a fisheries worker.

“This is enjoyable,” Pearce said. “You’re doing your job, and you’re educating kids, too. These are the days we look forward to.”

Get more information on DNR fish stocking at michigan.gov/fishing.

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Cross country runners head to state finals

Red Hawk runners Hannah Heintzleman and Dallas Mora will head to the Cross Country state finals this weekend. Pictured (L to R) is: Girls Varsity Coach Marie Covey, Hannah Heintzleman, Dallas Mora, and Boys Varsity Coach Garrett Lacey.

Red Hawk runners Hannah Heintzleman and Dallas Mora will head to the Cross Country state finals this weekend. Pictured (L to R) is: Girls Varsity Coach Marie Covey, Hannah Heintzleman, Dallas Mora, and Boys Varsity Coach Garrett Lacey.

Two members of the Cedar Springs Red Hawks cross-country program are returning to the State Finals on Saturday, November 5. Hannah Heintzelman, a senior, and Dallas Mora, a junior, qualified at regionals, where only the top 15 finishers move on to compete at Michigan International Speedway. Heintzelman placed 8th and Mora placed 7th.

Heintzelman competed in the 2014 finals along with her teammates, where the girls that season finished 7th. Heintzelman’s season was cut short last year due to a serious illness. Mora competed at the finals last year and placed 61st. Congratulations and good luck, Hannah and Dallas!

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Get growing and plant cool crops for an extra inning of healthy harvest

_awe-get-growing1

(BPT) – The growing season isn’t over with the arrival of cool weather. Until the first hard frost hits, you have time to plant, pick and plate delicious homegrown cool-weather crops – and save yourself some money in the produce aisle.

Favorable fall conditions mean growing cool weather crops is comparatively easy, with less care needed for a successful garden. Cool crops will start out strong, growing quickly and then slow their growth as days become shorter and cooler. You’ll also need to work less to protect your garden from destructive pests, as both insect and animal populations will taper off in fall. And since weeds will germinate less frequently, growing slower, weeding won’t be a time-consuming task. Finally, more rain and less sun and heat reduce the risk of crops falling victim to drought or too much heat.

_awe-get-growing2Perhaps the greatest advantage of fall gardening is that you’ll have fresh, healthy produce on hand well into the cooler season. Many autumn vegetables can endure the first few frosts if you provide them with proper protection, like row covers, cold frames or cloche. Some varieties—like spinach, collards and kale—actually  taste better when nipped by frost.

Fall growing tips

The first step to success is to know your growing season. In warm climates, fall crops can actually thrive throughout winter. In colder areas, the growing season will be shorter. Not sure when frost will arrive in your area? Check out the USDA frost map on the Bonnie Plants website.

Next, you need to ensure your growing spot is in tip-top shape. Regardless of where you choose to plant your garden – in the sunniest spot in the yard or in containers – it’s important to get the soil in shape; test the soil and add amendments if needed. Clear the ground and containers of any left-over garden debris, then add a 2-inch layer of mulch or compost, plus a balanced, natural fertilizer like Bonnie Plant Food, for a strong, healthy start.

Since fall’s growing season can be unpredictable, it’s important to give your garden every possible advantage. Get a jump-start and use transplants, like those offered by Bonnie Plants, in biodegradable pots, available at most garden retailers. They’re already six weeks old, so you’ll start growing right way, skip the volatile seed starting process and you’ll harvest six weeks sooner than if you start from seed.

Fall variety favorites

The plant pros at Bonnie Plants recommend some top performers for fall:

* Artwork Stir-Fry Broccoli – Also called stem broccoli, produces multiple long, edible stems with tender, bite-size heads instead of a single large head. This means you can harvest the small heads -perfect for stir-fries and sautéing.

* Brussels sprouts – Brussels sprouts are high in protein and vitamin C. These hardy “mini cabbages” grow along a thick stem and can stand up to frost.

* Bonnie hybrid cabbage – Cabbage heads will be ready to harvest when they’re firm and solid to the touch. Although they can withstand temps below 28 degrees, cabbages that go through a hard freeze won’t store as well, so be sure to harvest before temperatures drop very low.

* Georgia collards – The sweet, cabbage-like flavor of collards make them a favorite in southern dishes. Frost sweetens their flavor further, making collards a nutritious and delicious fall favorite.

* Spinach – A chill-loving green, spinach can produce abundant leaves ready to go from garden to table. Spinach is a nutritional powerhouse, and is high in vitamins A, C, K and E, as well as iron, maganese, folate and calcium.

* Cauliflower – Rich in vitamin C, cauliflower can withstand light frost and Bonnie’s can resist colder temperatures. Cauliflower is naturally low in calories and high in fiber.

Plant herbs too, like parsley, rosemary, thyme and onion chives; they’re wonderful culinary additions and they’re ready to harvest right away.

If you put proper practices into place this fall, you’ll get your garden off to the right start and reap an extra inning of a healthful and productive harvest. For more information on fall varieties and planting tips, visit www.bonnieplants.com.

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Cedar Springs Board of Education candidates

 

By Judy Reed

It has been one of the most volatile campaigns for the Cedar Springs Board of Education in recent years. Four people are running for two six-year seats. Originally there were five candidates, but Rita Reimbold dropped out. The other four are:

Joe Marckini

Joe Marckini

Joseph Marckini: Joe Marckini has served on the Board of Education for the last nine years, and is looking for six more. He grew up in the Walker area, and Joe and his family moved to Algoma Township in 1996. He and his wife, Elizabeth, have two daughters, Emily and Maria. He said that he and his wife desire to serve the community and especially any organization which helps educate and support kids. He has been employed by the Sheet Metal Workers International Association (SMWIA) Local #7 for over 30 years as a sheet metal construction worker.

Joe said he is running for another term to ensure that every student receives fair and equal opportunities. “If re-elected, I will continue advocating for all students’ right to a S.T.R.E.A.M. education (Science, Technology, Recess, Engineering, Arts & Math). I will continue making KIDS FIRST decisions, supporting more intervention for at-risk students and more life-skills and trade skills training opportunities.” He said he would also continue to be a voice for education at the federal, state and local levels. He also wants to continue the changes he has seen under Superintendent Dr. Laura VanDuyn. “I have been a part of bringing the current Superintendent to Cedar Springs. Under her leadership we have made many tough but important changes. So many positive things have happened over the last few years and I would like to be a part of the continued improvements.”

Besides serving on the Board of Education, Joe has also served on the Cedar Springs Executive Board PTO, Kent Intermediate School Board Association, National School Board Association (NSBA) Federal Relation Network, Friends of Kent County Schools, NEOLA policy committee, Cedar Springs Parks and Recreation, Cedar Springs Public Schools negotiation committee, and is the representative of Cedar Springs Public Schools Board of Education to the Michigan Association of School Boards (MASB).

Joe said that his main strength is the ability to make hard but necessary decisions. “I am a fierce advocate for kids. I am not on the board to make friends or get a pat on the back. I am here to make sure Cedar Springs Public Schools follows all rules and policies and is fair in its decision making regarding students and staff. I want to be sure that the parents in our district know that their child is not only getting an excellent education but will also be treated fairly and equitably and have not only the support of their teachers but also the staff, Superintendent and school board. As a member of the board I am often regarded as the policy-enforcer, I make sure we are operating within the law and within the guidelines we have set up for ourselves.”

Joe sees funding as the major challenge facing the district. “Funding and resources has an impact on everything we do and attempt to do. Security, smaller classroom sizes, busing, professional development, infrastructure improvements, they all rely on funding. That’s why being an advocate at all levels of government is so important. We have to keep working for our kids to ensure they get what they need and deserve as citizens of this great democracy.”

Ted Sabinas

Ted Sabinas

Ted Sabinas: Ted Sabinas and his wife Dianne have lived in Cedar Springs for 39 years.  He was a teacher in the district for 34 years and served as a Cedar Springs High School coach of cross country, track, and several other sports for 37 years. Their two daughters, Mrs. Kahler and Mrs K (Kacprzyk) graduated from Cedar Springs and are currently teaching in our district. Their grandchildren also attend school here. “I have been committed to Cedar Springs for 39 years and feel strongly about the opportunity to run for the school board to help impact and make a positive difference in our school district,” said Ted.

Ted said he his primary reason for running for office is to “bring a background of teaching, coaching and educational leadership, along with my passion for our district, and to help guide and participate in the decisions being made as they impact our school district, community, staff and most importantly our students,” he explained.

Sabinas said the main strength he would bring to the office lies in his years of teaching and coaching experience, and his collaborative training. “[My] teaching and coaching experience, along with my commitment to our district, can help me guide and participate in the decisions being made as they impact our school district. With my collaborative training I have the ability to see what needs to be accomplished and how to get to the correct outcome together.

“While serving as the Cedar Springs Association President and Head of Negotiations for 17 years, I was trained and practiced collaborative negotiations with past superintendents and Boards of Education with very successful outcomes,” he noted. “I have a proven track record of demonstrating collaboration, active listening, and driving results over the years.” He said that he and the teams he worked with created a culture in which all problems can be discussed openly and solved with support from all involved using the collaborative method.

Sabinas said that our district faces many challenges. “Challenges such as the district revenues and expenses; being responsible to the community that elected the board; and creating a district wide positive image, are just a few of the many challenges that a board member faces,” he said. “We must address these challenges with research, hope, and caution, and determine if the board decisions are the correct direction to follow for our students in Cedar Springs. As a board member I will always place students as the main priority but also keep the community and staff informed and seek input from students, community and the staff.”

Heidi Reed

Heidi Reed

Heidi Reed: Heidi Reed is a wife, mother and businesswoman who lives in the city of Cedar Springs. She has been married for 33 years to Steve Reed, a teacher.    Together they have three boys, Trey, Thomas and Trevor. Trey Reed, graduated from CSHS and recently Cornerstone University. Thomas and Trevor are 10th graders at CSHS. Heidi is Vice President/Associate Real Estate Broker for Red Oak Management Co., Inc. For 27 years she has been responsible for property management issues, finance and compliance for 1,300 families at 48 locations in Michigan.

Heidi said she is running for school board because she has a sense of duty to this community and is community centered. “I will keep kids first in decisions, by asking the question, who benefits? I will be financially focused and look for the highest and best use of the taxpayer dollars. I enjoy policy and finance work. I have no other agenda for seeking this position other than the desire to do what I can to help Cedar Springs Public Schools achieve and improve. Being in affordable housing, I see everyday, the nexus of how important education is to our society.”

Heidi has been active on school and business committees. She serves on the Cedar Springs Public Schools Sinking Fund Committee 2010 to present; the Cedar Springs Public Schools: Strategic Planning Committee 2015-2016; and the Cedar Springs Public Schools District Improvement Team, to name a few.

Heidi said the main strength she will bring to the board is leadership. “I will bring:

  • Constant Leadership-knowledge of our students, educators and facilities.  I have been attending board meetings for a year in preparation for this position.
  • Balanced Leadership-understanding of the issues and opportunities we face as a district.
  • Engaged Leadership-the passion to lead forward.”

Heidi said there are multiple challenges facing the district, but the first is meeting all students’ needs with limited funding. “We are facing budgetary and operational issues now in our district that impact not just the students and their futures, but the economic and social health of Cedar Springs. I have the experience, judgment and desire to step up to these issues and listen, learn and lead. My corporate experience of blending multiple government programs together for success will be an asset to the school board.”

Mistie Bowser

Mistie Bowser

Mistie Bowser:  Mistie Bowser has been living in Courtland Township for 16 years. She said she has loved living here with her four children—Emily Umphrey, a 2013 CSHS graduate; Cameron Umphrey, a 2016 CSHS graduate; Myla Umphrey a junior at CSHS; and Elizabeth Bowser, a fourth-grader at Cedar View.
“I’m a spokeswoman for the American Lung Association, where I travel and share my story, which helps bring more lung cancer awareness to help fight this disease,” she explained. “We are a very academic, arts and athletic family. I’ve been very involved with our football, hockey, soccer, cross country, track, theatre, advanced and resource learning programs.”

Mistie is a very involved mom and community member who takes great pride in where she chose to raise her children. “I’m running for the Cedar Springs School Board because I want to have a direct hand in the decisions being made that will directly affect our students education and extra curricular activities,” she explained. “I will research the options to ensure that I will be making the best decisions for our Cedar Springs students, which my youngest is only in 4th grade so I have many years to stay vested. Our students deserve the best and most competitive education and I want to ensure that happens by putting students first with our staff and community right behind them, making a successful collaborative triangle.  I want to serve my commuity of Cedar Springs by working hard for you on our Cedar Springs School Board.”

Mistie has served on several boards and committees, including Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) for nine years as member, treasurer, vice president and president; American Lung Association Regional Leadership Council as Chairwoman; the Mothers Of Preschoolers(MOPS) steering committee board; coached AYSO soccer; senior all night part committee, and more.

Mistie said the main strength she would bring to the board would be “my strong communication skills, understanding the importance and experience of being fiscally responsible, along with ensuring that I am and others are held accountable for all the decisions being made. I bring the perspective of a parent of a student and athlete in our district. Before voting on an item I will ensure that I have all the information from all sides so I can make a well-informed decision, and vote for what’s best for our students. I bring many years of leading non-profit organization boards with successful collaborative and respectful communication skills. I believe in everyone being fiscally responsible and accountable for all decisions being made. I will bring open communication along with always putting our students, staff and community front and center.”

“The major challenge in our district right now is the over 50 staff members that have left since January 2016, the fiscal decisions that have been made that are still not answered by our administration, and the communication and the morale of our staff and our community. Our district is hurting along with our community over some decisions that have been made over the past 2 years. I agree; I don’t like a lot of the decisions made either. My plan to address these problems is to communicate more, hold people accountable for their decisions, bring collaboration back, and use our finances responsibly by ensuring that money is only spent if it will directly affect our students. My biggest goal is to listen and communicate with our students, staff and community.”

Look for city and township candidates in next week’s Post!

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Crash sends four to the hospital

This crash occurred at 18 Mile and Myers Lake Friday morning, and took out a telephone pole. Post photo by J. Reed.

This crash occurred at 18 Mile and Myers Lake Friday morning, and took out a telephone pole. Post photo by J. Reed.

A two-vehicle crash in Nelson Township Friday morning sent four people to the hospital, including one with life-threatening injuries.

The crash occurred around 10:30 a.m. at the corner of 18 Mile Road and Myers Lake Avenue.

According to the Kent County Sheriff Department, the investigation determined that a Red 2008 Dodge Caravan, driven by Kellie Austin, age 41, from Rockford, was traveling southbound on Myers Lake Avenue. The red Caravan pulled out in front of a 2012 Black Chevy Suburban driven by Tia Powell, age 30, from Gowen, that had the right of way while traveling eastbound on 18 Mile Road. The black Suburban struck the front passenger side of the red Caravan. This sent both vehicles into the southeast corner of the intersection. The Suburban then struck a utility pole.

According to emergency personnel on scene, Kellie Austin was sent to Spectrum Health with life-threatening injuries. She had no passengers.

Tia Powell suffered back and stomach pain. The front seat passenger of the black Suburban, Tamera Townes, age 55, from Cedar Springs, suffered back pain. The rear center passenger of the black Suburban, Isaiah Powell age 2 from Gowen, suffered a bump to his lip. All three were transported by Rockford Ambulance to Butterworth Hospital.

All occupants were wearing seatbelts. Isaiah Powell was in his car seat.

Assisting at the scene was Cedar Springs Fire Department and Rockford Ambulance.

The intersection was closed for several hours while the police investigated the scene.

The case is still under investigation.

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The Post travels to state of Washington

 

From L to R: Erika Cardinal, Kelsey Kiander, Sarah Kiander, and Anna Behrenwald.

From L to R: Erika Cardinal, Kelsey Kiander, Sarah Kiander, and Anna Behrenwald.

Sisters Kelsey and Sarah Kiander, and their friend, Anna Behrenwald, took the Post and went to the state of Washington this summer to visit another Cedar Springs friend, Erika Cardinal, while she was working on Blakely Island. They visited Seattle, Whidbey Island, Anacortes, Friday Harbor, and Blakely Island.

“We enjoyed all of the tourist attractions in Seattle; we also were able to go whale watching,” said Kelsey. “This picture was taken in Oak Harbor, Washington, on Whidbey Island, with a great view of Mount Baker.”

Thanks so much for taking us with you on your trip!

Are you going on vacation? Take the Post with you and snap some photos. Then send them to us with some info to news@cedarspringspost.com or mail them to Post travels, PO Box 370, Cedar Springs, MI 49319. We will be looking for yours!

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Teens urged to “Arrive Alive”

 

The “Arrive Alive” tour gave Cedar Springs High School students a chance to see what could happen when they drive while texting or drive impaired. Post photo by J. Reed.

The “Arrive Alive” tour gave Cedar Springs High School students a chance to see what could happen when they drive while texting or drive impaired. Post photo by J. Reed.

By Judy Reed

Sophomore Devin Swatzell tests out the “Arrive Alive” simulation for drinking and driving. Post photo by J. Reed.

Sophomore Devin Swatzell tests out the “Arrive Alive” simulation for drinking and driving. Post photo by J. Reed.

Teens at Cedar Springs High School got the chance last week to get behind the wheel of a truck and see what dangers lurk for those who chance driving drunk or try to text while driving.UNITE’s “Arrive Alive” tour came to the Cedar Springs campus on Friday, October 21. The program uses a high-tech high-tech simulator, impact video, and a number of other resources to educate the public about the dangers of texting while driving and intoxicated driving. The simulator allows participants to experience the potential consequences of impaired and distracted driving in a controlled environment.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Aministration, drivers under 20 years old have the highest proportion of distraction-related fatal crashes.

The teens first watched a video that showed teens texting and driving and fatal accidents that result. They then could try the simulator outside. Teens were asked whether they wanted to try driving drunk or while texting. They then climbed in the truck and put on virtual reality goggles. The truck never moved; instead the goggles simulated them driving. If they chose drunk driving, they would get tunnel vision, with things going dark around them, so they wouldn’t be able to see the course as clearly, and their steering wheel would be delayed, not turn as well, since reflexes are slowed when driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs. If they chose texting and driving, the student would use their own phone and look at while trying to drive an obstacle course on the simulator. There would be red lights, people would pop up here and there, or try to cross the street at intersections.

Sophomore Devin Swatzell tried the drinking and driving course. “It was fun but it was hard,” he said. “I’ll still never drink and drive.” Swatzell said he could see how the simulator could help be a deterrent students.

The program was brought to the high school by the Car Center-Cedar Springs, who bought Cedar Body Shop, on White Creek Avenue, just south of 17 Mile Rd. “We thought it would be a great program to bring to local schools to show our concern for any type of distracted driving,” said Sylvia Edwards, of the Car Center. “Being new to the community, we thought it was something good to show what we stand for, what we are concerned about.”

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Red Hawks roll over Ottawa Hills

The Cedar Springs Varsity Football seniors walk across Red Hawk field one last time after their win over Ottawa Hills last Friday. Photo by K. Alvesteffer/R. LaLone.

The Cedar Springs Varsity Football seniors walk across Red Hawk field one last time after their win over Ottawa Hills last Friday. Photo by K. Alvesteffer/R. LaLone.

By student reporter, Maddie Nichols

The Cedar Springs Red Hawks varsity football team ended their season with a blowout against the Ottawa Hills’ Bengals. Although saying goodbye to our senior football players is tough, concluding with a big win made it a little easier.

The Hawks started off the game with carries by seniors Jacob Hooker and Dylan Ostrom-Howell, leading junior John Todd into the end zone with 10 minutes and 45 seconds remaining of the first quarter. With an immediate head start, the Hawks didn’t let down. Sophomore Lucas Pienton intercepted a pass and ran it in for a touchdown shortly after, and with a solid kick from senior Dustin Shaw, the score became 14-0. Todd made his way to the Bengal’s end zone again after a long run, with a little less than 7 minutes before the end of the first quarter. Pienton also made his way to another touchdown with a little over 3 minutes to go, and with a two-point conversion by Hooker, the score became 29-0. However, Cedar wasn’t stopping there. With only 38 seconds left, sophomore Ryan Ringler made a touchdown, making the lead even more significant. Tackles throughout the quarter by seniors Austin Basso, Jaron Spencer, Collin Alvesteffer and Thomas Hill, as well as Ringler, Todd and Pienton, prevented the Bengals from scoring, ending the first quarter with a score of 36-0.

Senior Thomas Hill started off the second quarter on a high note for the Hawks with a touchdown 12 seconds in. The score then became 43-0. Hill and junior Nate Patin held off Ottawa Hills for a while, but the Bengals picked off a Cedar pass and ran it into the end zone, making the score 43-6, with Cedar still holding a huge lead. Carries from seniors Austin Ellis and Joe Reich-Tanis led to junior Nick Campione running in for a touchdown with 6 minutes and 52 seconds remaining of the first half, making the score 50-6. Tackles by Pienton, juniors Darius Barnett and Colton Gould, and senior Jaron Lucas gave the ball back to Cedar. Junior Jake West made a touchdown with 3 minutes left, increasing the score to 57-6. Tackles by junior Riley Hawkins, Ringler and Ellis held that score going into the second half.

The second half was full of support from all of the players. Senior starters went on the sideline and watched their underclassmen play their hearts out. With emotions running wild, the Hawks did nothing but prevail. Carries by Todd and junior Paul Krajewski kept the momentum going, as well as tackles by Spencer, Pienton, and Krajewski. Then, as if the night couldn’t be any greater, senior Dustin Shaw kicked the longest field goal in Cedar Springs’ history—40 yards—making the score 60-6, and that’s where the score stayed until the end.

The season was an emotional and intense one, but the community of Cedar Springs could not be any prouder of the way it ended. The boys of fall graduating will be going on to greater things, and the ones remaining will keep their legacy going next year. Cedar Springs finished the season 3-3 in conference, and 4-5 overall.

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Be an ethical hunter: buy a license before you go 

out-ethical-hunter-deer

And don’t loan kill tags

Conservation officers with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources urge deer hunters to engage in an ethical hunt: Buy a license before going out and don’t loan kill tags.

Every deer hunting season, DNR conservation officers encounter individuals engaged in unethical hunting practices. These officers tackle many cases of individuals buying hunting licenses after harvesting deer or loaning kill tags to friends or relatives.

“Each year, we see cases of individuals waiting to buy licenses until after they have shot a deer,” said Dean Molnar, assistant chief of the DNR’s Law Enforcement Division. “We remind all hunters that you must buy your license before you go out to hunt and have it in your possession when afield. Buying a license is not only the ethical and responsible thing to do; it is the law. Harvesting a deer without a license is poaching.”

Deer poaching in Michigan carries a restitution payment of $1,000 per deer, a $200 to $1,000 fine and jail time up to 90 days. In addition, a violator’s hunting privileges are suspended for three years. Under the new law that took effect in 2014, antlered deer are assessed an additional $1,000 in restitution plus the standard $1,000 for illegally killing any deer. In addition, deer with eight points but not more than 10 are $500 a point, while deer with 11 points or more are assessed a penalty of $750 per point.

Additional years of hunting privileges will be revoked for violators. This includes an additional two years of revoked hunting privileges for the first offense and an additional seven years for a second or subsequent offences. Michigan also participates in the Wildlife Violator Compact, which includes hunting revocation in participating states.

Another unethical practice encountered frequently each hunting season in Michigan is the loaning of kill tags to an unlicensed individual who has harvested a deer.

“Loaning kill tags is among the top violations we see while on patrol, and is often done for friends or relatives who are from out of state to avoid paying the nonresident license fee,” said Molnar. “Kill tags must be validated and attached immediately to your harvested deer and visible for inspection. It is unlawful to loan out or borrow kill tags.”

For more information on deer hunting in Michigan, go to www.michigan.gov/deer.

To report a natural resource violation, please call the Report All Poaching hotline at 800-292-7800. Learn more at www.michigan.gov/rap.

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From easy art to a sweet treat

hal-easy-art-mummy

Family Features

Spooky, silly or symbolic, carved pumpkins are an essential ingredient to any Halloween celebration. This year, scare up some special fun for your party with a wicked watermelon carving instead—but don’t stop there.

After crafting your watermelon into an artful mummy, take advantage of the healthy, immune-system supporting qualities of the lycopene leader among fresh produce. At 92 percent water, as well as an excellent source of vitamins A and C, watermelon is a hydrating post-art snack.

Carving a creative design into a watermelon is a simple way to kick off the festivities and requires only a handful of common tools. Add a twinkling candle to make a fantastically frightful centerpiece. Or fill it with a fresh fruit salad or salsas for a more functional, practical approach.

Even if you’re planning on a hollowed-out carving, keep the sweet juicy fruit and make it a healthy addition to your Halloween party menu with a recipe that puts to use all your carving leftovers.

To take advantage of all a watermelon has to offer—outside of the fun carving—try Frosted, Frozen Watermelon Balls or Kids Watermelon Pizza Supreme. These fun, simple recipes make it easy to incorporate a healthy snack after all your hard work carving up a Halloween masterpiece.

Find more recipes, carving patterns and inspiration at watermelon.org.

Carving Tips

Prior to carving, read through all of the directions.

Cuts are easiest when the watermelon is at room temperature. Once your handiwork is complete, chill the carving and contents before serving.

After drawing your design on the rind, insert toothpicks in key places to guide your cuts.

A sharp knife with a pointed tip makes the easiest, cleanest cuts.

Remove excess flesh in large pieces, when possible, to allow for easier melon ball or cube creation.

Use round toothpicks or skewers to attach pieces to your design as flat toothpicks are not strong enough to bear the weight or stand up to the thickness of the rind.

Choosing a Watermelon

With a thick rind covering the fruit inside, you may wonder how to choose the best watermelon at the market. Here are some tips for picking the perfect one:

Look it over. Look for a round, oval or oblong shaped watermelon that is free from bruises, cuts or dents.

Lift it up. The watermelon should be heavy for its size. On average, a 5-pound watermelon yields 15 cups of edible fruit.

Turn it over. The underside of the watermelon should have a creamy yellow spot from where it sat on the ground and ripened in the sun.

hal-easy-art-mummyMummy

Supplies and Tools:

Oval or round seedless watermelon

Cutting board

Kitchen knife

Small bowl

Dry erase marker

Paring knife

Melon baller, fluted or regular

Scoop

Assorted peelers

Cheesecloth

Straight pin

Battery-operated candle or light

Candy eyeballs or blueberries

Wash watermelon under cool running water and pat dry.

On cutting board, place watermelon on its side and use kitchen knife to cut off 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch from bottom (end opposite stem), being careful not to cut too deep into white part of rind.

Cut 1/2-inch to 3/4-inch from stem end to create opening large enough to fit small bowl.

Using dry erase marker, draw eyes, nose and mouth, along with wavy slits around carving to let more light flow through. Use paring knife to cut out design, being sure to cut through to red fruit.

Use fluted or regular melon baller to hollow out inside of watermelon. Use scoop to remove excess watermelon.

Peel green rind off outside of watermelon. (Tip: Different peelers work well for different parts of the watermelon, depending on how flat or round the melon is.)

Wrap thin strips of cheesecloth around mummy carving and secure with straight pin, if needed.

Put battery-operated candle or light into carving. Fit small bowl into top of carving and trim away excess rind to make bowl fit securely. Fill bowl with melon balls and attach candy or blueberries to make eyes.

hal-easy-art-watermelon-pizzaKids Watermelon Pizza Supreme

Servings: 6

1 watermelon slice (8-10 inches around and 1-inch thick), drained

1 cup strawberry preserves

1/2 cup white chocolate chips

1/2 cup raisins

1/2 cup chopped walnuts

1 cup sweetened shredded coconuts

Place watermelon slice on serving platter and cut into 6 wedges, leaving in shape of pizza.

Spread preserves over watermelon and sprinkle chocolate chips, raisins, walnuts and coconut.

 

hal-easy-art-watermelon-ballsFrosted, Frozen Watermelon Balls 

Servings: 35-40

1 small watermelon

1 package (3 ounces) watermelon or other red flavor gelatin dessert

Using melon baller, scoop out 35-40 small watermelon balls. Place on paper towels and set aside.

Pour gelatin into shallow bowl. One-by-one, gently drop watermelon balls into bowl, roll around, take out and place on plate covered with paper towel. Repeat until all gelatin is used.

Place plate of frosted watermelon balls in freezer. Allow at least 2 hours to make sure they are completely frozen. Remove from freezer and let sit a few minutes before eating.

Note: To serve with toothpicks, place toothpicks in before freezing to aid in serving.

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