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Make traffic safety a priority for Memorial Day Weekend 

Michigan State Police make a traffic stop. Photo courtesy of MSP.

As Michiganders take to the roads to get to their Memorial Day weekend destination, Michigan State Police troopers will be on patrol to encourage safe and responsible driving.

Again this year, MSP troopers are joining their counterparts from across the country in the international traffic safety initiative Operation Crash Awareness and Reduction Efforts (C.A.R.E.) to promote traffic safety during this busy travel period.

“Our troopers will be on patrol as part of Operation C.A.R.E. and the statewide Click It or Ticket safety belt mobilization throughout the holiday weekend,” stated Col. Kriste Kibbey Etue, director of the MSP. “In addition to looking for safety belt and child restraint violations, troopers will pay special attention to drivers who are under the influence of alcohol and drugs or are driving in a reckless and unsafe manner.”

Last year, there were five fatal traffic crashes that resulted in six deaths over the Memorial Day weekend.

Operation C.A.R.E. began in 1977 as a collaborative effort between the MSP and the Indiana State Police, and is one of the nation’s longest-running traffic safety initiatives. It focuses on deterring the three main causes of highway fatalities: aggressive driving, impaired driving and failure to use occupant restraints.

State police and highway patrol agencies from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Ontario Provincial Police, Quebec Police Force and the U.S. Virgin Islands will be participating in this lifesaving traffic safety initiative. Beginning this year, Operation C.A.R.E. includes participation from police agencies affiliated with the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) as well.

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State record broken by same angler nearly nine years later

Roy Beasley of Madison Heights has the distinction of holding two state records for the same species of fish, first in 2008 and again in 2017. Here he is with his recent record-setting bigmouth buffalo catch from the River Raisin in Monroe County.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources recently confirmed a new state-record fish for bigmouth buffalo. This marks the first state-record fish caught in 2017—and it was caught by an angler who held the previous state record for bigmouth buffalo from 2008.

The new record fish was caught by Roy Beasley of Madison Heights, Michigan, in the River Raisin (Monroe County) Saturday, May 13, at 11 a.m. Beasley was bowfishing. The fish weighed 27 pounds and measured 35.25 inches.

The record was verified by Todd Wills, a DNR fisheries research manager on Lake St. Clair.

Beasley held the previous state-record bigmouth buffalo—this one caught on the Detroit River—from August 2008. That fish weighed 24.74 pounds and measured 34.50 inches.

“More and more people are enjoying the sport of bowfishing and recognizing the thrill it can offer those who pursue it,” said Sara Thomas, the DNR’s Lake Erie Management Unit manager. “The river system in Southeast Michigan offers ample opportunity to catch rather large fish. A huge congrats to Mr. Beasley for having broken this record twice.”

The DNR reminds anglers who bowfish to properly dispose of all specimens they harvest.

State records are recognized by weight only. To qualify for a state record, fish must exceed the current listed state record weight and identification must be verified by a DNR fisheries biologist.

To view a current list of Michigan state fish records, visit michigan.gov/staterecordfish.

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Hill to play basketball at Grace Bible next year

Cedar Springs Red Hawk senior Thomas Hill signed a letter of intent to play college basketball at Grace Bible College next year. Thomas is pictured with his mom, Latrice Russell, and Grace Bible College Coach and Athletic Director, Gary Bailey.

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Pompeii-The Musical

Cleo (Sammi Kunz), Lucy (Ruth Madison), and Brutus (Steve Hutchins) in Pompeii—the musical.

Reviewed by Tom Noreen

Tired of political correctness and looking for a good laugh? If so, then get your tickets to local playwright Scott Phillips’ fresh off the parchment Pompeii-The Musical with music by Jill Detroit and Sean Anthony. As Scott noted in his program, “Another May, another play.”

Set in ancient Pompeii just before the city’s demise in 79 AD by the epic eruption of Mt Vesuvius, the toga clad actors are going about their daily lives. In particular the focus is on the star crossed lovers Cleo (Sammi Kunz) and Augie (Scott Herdegen) who cannot seem to reconcile their religious beliefs. As in most cases, family and friends are doing their best to make the match work, with varying degrees of success. Among these are Cleo’s younger sister, Lucy (Madison Ruth); her brother, Brutus (Steve Hutchins); and Augie’s mother, Titania (David Schmuker). As a result of his efforts, Brutus falls in love with Olyve Gardenia (Jessica Talsma) a Roman who has a phobia for Romans!

Other members of the cast include Bob Kellner as “I, Claudius” and Debbie Irwin as his wife “Cornie.” The local oracle (read shrink) “Nero” played by Doug Christensen and his wife “Gripy” portrayed by Kathy Anderson. The chorus line of statues are Annie Bagin, Savana Williams, Jack Bagin, and Kirsten Bagin.

This performance also premieres the Kent Theatre’s new LED lighting system. After many years of planning and fundraising, the theatre has a state of the art lighting system. Thanks to all of the patrons and donors that made this possible.

Shows for this weekend are Friday, May 26 at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, May 27 at 7:30 p.m.

Adult tickets are $12 in advance, $15 at the door; tickets for those under 18 years are only $6. Advanced tickets can be purchased at the Cedar Springs Public Library, or reserved by emailing Scott at phillips4ba@yahoo.com.

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Cedar Springs Community Library Grand Opening

The ceremonial ribbon cutting at the new Cedar Springs Community Library. From L to R: Duane McIntyre, licensed builder; Solon Township Supervisor Bob Ellick; Cedar Springs Mayor Gerald Hall; Library Director Donna Clark; CS City Manager Michael Womack; Lakeland Library Coop Director Sandra Wilson; Claudia and Tom Mabie, representatives of the Community Building Development Team. Not shown are Mayor Pro Tem Pam Conley (to the far left of Duane McIntyre) and Kurt Mabie, Chair of the CBDT (to the right of Tom Mabie). Photo by Kathy Anderson.

The ceremonial ribbon cutting at the new Cedar Springs Community Library. From L to R: Duane McIntyre, licensed builder; Solon Township Supervisor Bob Ellick; Cedar Springs Mayor Gerald Hall; Library Director Donna Clark; CS City Manager Michael Womack; Lakeland Library Coop Director Sandra Wilson; Claudia and Tom Mabie, representatives of the Community Building Development Team. Not shown are Mayor Pro Tem Pam Conley (to the far left of Duane McIntyre) and Kurt Mabie, Chair of the CBDT (to the right of Tom Mabie). Photo by Kathy Anderson.

By Sue Harrison

A project planned for many years became a reality last Saturday, May 13, with the grand opening celebration of the new Cedar Springs Community Library, located in the “Heart of Cedar Springs” at the corner of Main and W. Maple St.

Sue Harrison, Master of Ceremonies, introduced the event by thanking the dozens of organizations and countless individuals who have been working on the Town Square, which includes the new library, a Veteran’s Clock Tower, a bridge across Cedar Creek, a steel dragonfly sculpture, and the historic flowing well.

“So much has been done already, but in order to complete the vision, much more funding is needed through donations and pledges through the Community Building Development Team,” she added.

The Ceremony started with the American Legion Color Guard Glen Hill Post 287 raising the American flag and the State of Michigan Flag on the new flagpoles in front of the Library

The Ceremony started with the American Legion Color Guard Glen Hill Post 287 raising the American flag and the State of Michigan Flag on the new flagpoles in front of the Library

The Ceremony started with the American Legion Color Guard Glen Hill Post 287 raising the American flag and the State of Michigan Flag on the new flagpoles in front of the Library. Viet Nam veteran Dan Davis delivered the invocation, which was followed by the playing of the Star Spangled Banner and America the Beautiful by members of the Cedar Springs High School, under the direction of Ryan Miller and Adam Borst.

City Manager Michael Womack and Mayor Pro-tem Pam Conley spoke about the city planting a maple tree on the library grounds. Mayor Gerald Hall presented some special “Making a Difference” awards to Duane McIntyre, Kurt Mabie, Dale Larson, and Dean Wall for for their work on the “Heart of Cedar Springs” projects.

Louise King, member of the Library Board, gave some of the history of the library in Cedar Springs and introduced Cedar Springs Library Director Donna Clark, who spoke about the importance of the new library to the Cedar Springs Community.

Crowd gathers in front of library for the Grand Opening.

Crowd gathers in front of library for the Grand Opening.

“This is a very significant contribution to our community and one only being accomplished through a cooperative and caring group of people. Our community now has its own library where people of all ages can learn, share, gather, and celebrate for many years to come,” said Clark.

The Ribbon Cutting for the Library followed with many dignitaries present. They were Duane McIntyre, licensed builder; Solon Township Supervisor Bob Ellick; Cedar Springs Mayor Gerald Hall; Library Director Donna Clark; CS City Manager Michael Womack; Lakeland Library Coop Director Sandra Wilson; Claudia and Tom Mabie and Kurt Mabie, representatives of the Community Building Development Team.

Mayor Gerald Hall does a ceremonial first check-out of The Cedar Springs Story. He is shown here with co-author Sue Harrison and Library Director Donna Clark. Photo by Kathy Anderson.

Mayor Gerald Hall does a ceremonial first check-out of The Cedar Springs Story. He is shown here with co-author Sue Harrison and Library Director Donna Clark. Photo by Kathy Anderson.

After the ribbon cutting, Mayor Gerald Hall ceremonially checked out the first book, a signed copy of The Cedar Springs Story presented to him by co-author, Sue Harrison. The book will remain permanently in the library and will be checked out in perpetuity to the Mayor.

Members of the Cedar Springs Women’s Club served refreshments to the hundreds of visitors who toured the new library and grounds. Visitors also talked with local authors Sue Harrison, Shirley Neff, Kathryn Moore, David Stricklen and puppeteer Rebecca Casavant. The Open House lasted from 2:30-5:00 p.m.

 

View of the Community Room patio.

View of the Community Room patio.

View of the interior of the new Cedar Springs Community Library

View of the interior of the new Cedar Springs Community Library

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Oakfield Twp man dies in crash

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A man was killed in Nelson Township last weekend after another driver ran a stop sign and hit his vehicle.

According to the Kent County Sheriff Department, the crash occurred shortly before 11:30 a.m. on Saturday, May 13, at the intersection of 18 Mile Rd and Myers Lake Ave. Police said that Phillip Allen Garcia, 18, of Solon Township, was driving a Chevy Monte Carlo southbound on Myers Lake Ave and ran the stop sign at 18 Mile. His vehicle then struck an eastbound Chevy Impala that had the right of way.

The driver of the Impala, Edward Allen Czarnecki, 59, of Oakfield Township, was pronounced dead at the scene. The driver of the Monte Carlo sustained minor, non-life threatening injuries.

Cedar Springs Fire and Rescue and Spencer Township Fire and Rescue assisted at the scene.

Alcohol is not believed to be a factor in the crash. Both drivers wore seatbelts and the crash remains under investigation.

The Post checked with the Kent County Road Commission to find out how many crashes have occurred at this intersection over the last five years.

According to spokesperson Maura Lamoreaux, prior to this crash, there have been nine crashes at that intersection over the last five years and four months (2013 to April 2017). One of them was fatal (in 2013). So about two per year.

She said that to modify traffic control at an intersection, the Kent County Road Commission must follow warrants in accordance with the “Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices” by the U.S. Dept. of Transportation. “This is the state and national standard,” she explained.

Lamoreaux added that a study was just completed for the intersection, and it showed that the intersection did not warrant changes to traffic control. “We will continue to monitor this intersection for any changes that would warrant a modification in traffic control,” she said.

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The Post travels to Traverse City 

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The Post went on a wine tasting tour in Traverse City over Mother’s Day weekend. Judy Reed, of Cedar Springs, was treated to the weekend as a Mother’s Day present from her children, Rachel Hunt, Jessica Williams, and Steven Reed. The four visited several wineries on both the Old Mission Peninsula and the Leelanau Peninsula, tasted all things cherry at Cherry Republic, and enjoyed the beautiful scenery surrounding Traverse City and the bay.

Thanks to the Reed family for taking us with you!

If you are going on a trip, take a Post with you, snap a photo, and send it to us, along with some info about your trip. Be sure to include your contact info in case we have a question. Send your Post travels stories and photos to news@cedarspringspost.com.

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Hurray for the Red, White and Blue!

USA chanting with the K-2 students.

USA chanting with the K-2 students.

Upper elementary students incorporate motions into their songs

Upper elementary students incorporate motions into their songs

On Wednesday, May 3, CTA elementary students presented their final concert of the year. This concert was patriotic-themed. Students were dressed in a sea patriotic colors. All K-5 students started off the concert with the a salute to our country by singing the national anthem. K-2 students then energetically chanted “USA” to some music followed by a version of “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star” called “Twinkle, Twinkle, 50 Stars”. Other highlights of the concert included a bucket drumming ensemble, a recorder ensemble that played “My Country ‘Tis of Thee”, an xylophone ensemble, and some students rapping the 50 states in order. Everyone enjoyed the patriotic theme and students enjoyed the unique aspects of the performance.

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Beers from CS Brewing earn gold medals

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BUS-CS-Brewing-LA-Gold-MedalTwo beers from Cedar Springs Brewing Company won gold medals at the 2017 Los Angeles International Beer Competition, held the last week in April, in Los Angeles, California.

Küsterer Heller Weissbier was the recipient of the Gold medal in the “South German Style Hefeweizen” category, and Küsterer Weizenbock was the recipient of the Gold medal in the “South German Style Wheat Ale” category.

The beer competition drew entries from as far Croatia, Vietnam, Quebec and British Columbia. Entries were received from 29 US states, including Michigan, California, Arizona, Nevada, Texas, Wisconsin, New York, Arkansas, Oregon, Idaho, Washington DC and Hawaii.

Entries were up 30 percent from last year, not surprisingly, according to competition organizers, with the craft beer industry booming. Beers submitted into 95 divisions. Many styles and price ranges were represented. Beers were tasted over four days by a 100-member panel comprised of BJCP certified judges, brew masters and beer industry officials.

This year, judges handed out 88 Gold medals, 89 Silver and 81 Bronze, as well as 35 honorable mentions.

But these aren’t the first beers from CS Brewing to win awards. Last year, their Küsterer Original Weissbier was awarded the Bronze Medal at the 2016 Great American Beer Festival in the German-Style Wheat Ale category.

“We are humbled and overjoyed to have won with several of our Bavarian-style wheat beers against outstanding international competition, including the world-famous Weihenstephaner Hefeweizen,” stated owner David Ringler. “We are passionate about this style, along with Bavarian brewing traditions, and we continue to create a brewing destination in Cedar Springs as a small part of Beer City, USA.”

Cedar Springs brewing staff includes: Benevolent Overlord of Brewing, Matt Peterson; Fräulein Brewster, Manda Geiger; Director of Happiness, David Ringler; and Kellertyp, Sam Waite.

A complete list of winners can be found at www.labeercomp.com.

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Wetlands Month featured creature: the bullfrog

Michigan’s largest frog, the bullfrog, can be found in many wetlands around the state.

Michigan’s largest frog, the bullfrog, can be found in many wetlands around the state.

May is American Wetlands Month—a month to appreciate and enjoy the wonders of wetlands. Take some time to experience this amazing native ecosystem by visiting one of Michigan’s Wetland Wonders. There, you may find Michigan’s largest frog, the bullfrog.

Bullfrogs are large frogs ranging in size from 3.5 to 8 inches long. They can be green, brown, olive or yellowish in color. You can tell the difference between the male and female bullfrog by looking at their throats. The adult male bullfrog has a bright yellow throat, and the female has a white throat.

These impressive frogs live in ponds, lakes, marshes, sloughs, and impoundments, and they love areas with warm water and abundant plant life. Bullfrogs eat almost anything they can swallow, including insects, other frogs, snakes, small mammals and even birds!

Bullfrogs mate in June and July, and females lay anywhere from 5,000 to 20,000 eggs. The eggs form a jelly-like mass that can cover the surface of the water up to 5 square feet. Bullfrog eggs hatch very quickly—in three to six days. The tadpoles grow rapidly and can reach 6 inches in length. It takes two to three years for a bullfrog tadpole to mature into an adult frog.

When calling to attract a mate, male bullfrogs give a low, resounding “brr-rr-rr-rum” or “jug-o-rum” call. Bullfrogs may also scream or yelp if they are captured or startled. This loud outburst may startle a captor enough to drop the frog, allowing it to swim to safety.

These fascinating frogs can be found in many of Michigan’s wetlands, including Michigan’s Wetland Wonders. To learn more about these areas visit mi.gov/wetlandwonders.

Michigan’s state game and wildlife areas are free to wildlife watchers. Hunting license fees pay for habitat management at these areas. Even if you are not a hunter in the traditional sense, consider purchasing an $11 dollar base license to help the creatures you hunt with your binoculars, cameras and spotting scopes.

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