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Four-way stop installed at 13 Mile and Pine Island

This was the scene of a fatal crash two weeks ago at 13 Mile and Pine Island. Post photo by L. Allen.

Drivers traveling 13 Mile Road in Algoma Township need to be aware that they are now required to stop at Pine Island. Previously only those traveling on Pine Island were required to stop.

The Kent County Road Commission put the new stop signs in this week after the Kent County Board of Commissioner approved the all-way stop on Monday, August 14, during their August board meeting. 

It was just two weeks ago that Todd Carlson, 49, of Casnovia, was killed at that intersection while traveling westbound on 13 Mile after an eastbound vehicle turned left into his vehicle.

According to a press release from the Kent County Road Commission, “Modifications to traffic control are dictated by regulations set forth by the Federal Highway Administration, who identifies specific warranting criteria that must be met for a traffic control change to occur. The Kent County Road Commission routinely monitors intersections throughout its road and bridge network for changes that meet warrants for traffic control modification. Recent analysis of traffic volumes and crash history at the 13 Mile Road and Pine Island Drive intersection indicate that the necessary warrants have been met for an all-way stop to be installed.”

The intersection joins two other intersections—13 Mile and Algoma and 13 Mile and Edgerton—as four-way stops.

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The Post travels to Alaska

From L to R: Harry Eastwood, of Melbourne, Australia, and Mary Balon and Kim Gillow, of Cedar Springs.

The Post recently traveled to Alaska with Kim Gillow and Mary Balon, of Cedar Springs. “We met up with our Australian friend, Harry Eastwood, in Fairbanks and spent two weeks travelling around,” said Kim. “We went to Fairbanks, Denali, Talkeetna, Anchorage, Seward, Homer, and all of the points in between. Talkeetna was one of our favorites.”

Are you going on vacation? Take the Post with you and snap some photos. Then send them to us with some info to news@cedarspringspost.com or mail them to Post travels, PO Box 370, Cedar Springs, MI 49319. We will be looking for yours!

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In the Spotlight: The Cedar Springs Fire Department

The Cedar Springs Fire Department fights a fire in Northland Estates in 2013.

By Carolee Cole

The Cedar Springs Fire and Rescue Department is a lean, clean, helping machine, full of spunk, kindness and compassion. These men and women volunteer to do many different things in our community and while all volunteers are important and keep the community moving forward with their efforts, I think I can safely say that no other volunteer group has as much responsibility or is required to be as available, without forewarning, as our amazing Fire and Rescue Department. 

Fire Chief Marty Fraser

There are 13 active firefighters and five first responders currently serving the department. Marty Fraser is our Fire Chief and the only salaried employee of the department. He is a most unassuming, humble man focused, number one, on keeping us and our possessions safe, and number two, on leading his department well. He’s been involved with the fire department for nearly 40 years having joined in April of 1977. I’m just going to say, this good-looking, kind-hearted man must have still been a teenager when he joined! 

A few members of the team have been serving the department for over 25 years and several joined in 1998, so there is a lot of cumulative experience represented in your local fire department. You can count on them to be there when you need them and to know what to do! To become a firefighter, you attend school one night per week and one Saturday per month for 6 months. Medical First Responders (MFR’s) typically attend training to become a firefighter and then attend MFR school for an additional 12-14 weeks. After initial training is complete, each member of the department is required to continue training once per month for a total of 60-80 hours per year to keep their training and certification up-to-date. School and training is paid for by the department.

In addition to keeping us safe and keeping their training relevant, firefighters participate in a lot of community events like parades, car shows, going to the elementary schools or career day at the high school as well as Girl and Boy Scouts’ events and other clubs in the area. Fire Chief Fraser noted that the firefighters are quick to volunteer for these events and donate countless hours to keep our children and us clear on safety things like, “Stop, Drop and Roll” and scream and holler if you’re ever trapped in a burning house, as well as child car seat checks and much more. This team has a real sense of Cedar Springs pride and community contribution.

I bet you are wondering what your firefighters get paid to keep you safe, attend the training, and show up with the fire trucks at school, girl scouts and parades. Let’s break it down. They get paid $0 for showing up at parades, school activities, girl scouts and other such scheduled events. They get $120 per year for attending all trainings and meetings. And, they get paid $11 for each emergency response. That’s it, unless the run goes over three hours, then they get an additional $11 for the second three hours! I’m actually doubting that these payments cover their gas money! But, That. Is. It! And they have to be ready at a moment’s notice since heart attacks and car accidents as well as fires are not scheduled into our days. 

While we were talking to Chief Fraser, a call came in. Stacy Velting, a medical first responder (MFR) for the department, responded to a medical situation at a local business. Stacey got there before the ambulance, assessed the situation, and developed a rapport with the person collecting their health history, name and contact information. The person was transported to the hospital and Stacy returned to the station where she repacked the “First In” bag and made sure it was ready for the next call.

We are so lucky to be the beneficiaries of the commitment the Cedar Springs Fire Department brings to the job of keeping us safe. In the next few weeks we’ll do a follow-up article to get you even more impressive information about how effective they are. Between now and then, drive by the department when the team is out washing the trucks, training or preparing the equipment for another call and yell out a thanks to them. 

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Cub Scout presents check to Nature Center

 

Ryan Hess with Howard Christensen board members and Ryan’s younger siblings.

Ryan Hess, of Cub Scout Pack 3220, presented a check of $430.66 to Howard Christensen Nature Center last Saturday, August 4.

“We are so grateful for his donation,” Kim Gillow, on behalf of the Nature Center. “He is the best!”

Ryan needed to raise money for a community project for his Cub Scout badge. His older brother had done a can drive for a student with cancer, so Ryan decided he wanted to do one for HCNC, who had lost money due to an embezzlement. In addition to the can drive, he and his mom invited the Dark Knight of Michigan and the Cosplay Crusaders to the Cedar Springs Historical Society Car Show, where people got a chance to sit in the bike back for a donation. The pack also sold their beef sticks, with the proceeds going to HCNC.

Ryan in the Critter Room and Interpretive Center.

He is optimistic that they will be able to pay some bills or get another animal for the critter room. 

“I’m lucky I got to get in the $400s. It feels awesome,” he said. 

“Thanks to Cub Scout Pack 3220, The Dark Knight of Michigan, Cosplay Crusaders, and Cedar Springs Historical Museum Car Show and our community for making Ryan’s project successful!” said Ryan’s mom, Dana Hess. 

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Our Mission

Creative Technologies Academy is a K-12 community of learners committed to changing our world by developing students in character, scholarship, and leadership.

 

FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL MONDAY, AUGUST 20

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Marching band completes band camp

The Cedar Springs High School Marching band recently attended band camp where they worked on their 2018 show entitled “We the people.” At the end of the week, they did performed for the community to showcase what they had learned.

The band is grateful to the Cedar Springs Fire Department for hosing them off after a hot day, and appreciates the community for their support!

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New deer regulations related to chronic wasting disease

Included is a ban on baiting and feeding in CWD Management zone, including Kent County

Michigan’s Natural Resources Commission approved new hunting regulations last week aimed at slowing the spread of chronic wasting disease.

The action came after months of commission members and Department of Natural Resources staff hearing from hunters, residents and others interested in the long-term health of the state’s deer population, and a thorough review of the best available science on chronic wasting disease.

“We hope that by setting these specific CWD regulations we can limit the movement of this disease in Michigan,” said Vicki Pontz, NRC chairperson. “We appreciate all the comments we have received from across the state. Michigan hunters are very passionate about deer and deer hunting, and I look forward to working with them as we continue to confront this threat to wildlife and our valued hunting tradition.”

CWD is a fatal neurological (brain and nervous system) disease found in cervids—deer, elk and moose. The disease attacks the brains of infected animals and produces small lesions that result in death. There is no cure; once an animal is infected, it will die.

The disease first was discovered in Michigan in a free-ranging deer in May 2015. To date, more than 31,000 deer in Michigan have been tested for chronic wasting disease, and CWD has been confirmed in 60 free-ranging deer in six Michigan counties: Clinton, Ingham, Ionia, Jackson, Kent and Montcalm.

The approved deer hunting regulations, which will be in effect for the 2018 deer seasons unless noted otherwise, include:

  • Reduced the 4-point on-a-side antler requirement on the restricted tag of the combination license in the 16-county CWD Management Zone. Under the new regulation, a hunter in the CWD Management Zone can use the restricted tag of the combination license to harvest a buck with antlers as long as it has at least one 3-inch antler. 
  • Created a discounted antlerless license opportunity in the CWD Management Zone on private land; if purchased, the license will expire Nov. 4, 2018.
  • Effective immediately, a statewide ban on the use of all natural cervid urine-based lures and attractants, except for lures that are approved by the Archery Trade Association.
  • An immediate ban on baiting and feeding in the 16-county area identified as the CWD Management Zone. This area includes Calhoun, Clinton, Eaton, Gratiot, Hillsdale, Ingham, Ionia, Isabella, Jackson, Kent, Mecosta, Montcalm, Muskegon, Newaygo, Ottawa and Shiawassee counties.
  • A ban on baiting and feeding in the Lower Peninsula, effective Jan. 31, 2019, with an exception to this ban for hunters with disabilities who meet specific requirements. The start date on this regulation is intended to allow bait producers and retailers time to adjust to the new rule.
  • Effective immediately in the CWD Management Zone and four-county bovine tuberculosis area (in Alcona, Alpena, Montmorency and Oscoda counties), hunters with disabilities who meet specific requirements can now use 2 gallons of single-bite bait, such as shelled corn, during the Liberty and Independence hunts.
  • Allowance of all legal firearms to be used in muzzleloader season in the CWD Management Zone.
  • A purchase limit of 10 private-land antlerless licenses per hunter in the CWD Management Zone.
  • Restrictions on deer carcass movement in the five-county CWD Core Area (Ionia, Kent, Mecosta, Montcalm and Newaygo counties) and the CWD Management Zone.
  • Antlerless options on deer licenses/combo licenses during firearms seasons in the five-county CWD Core Area.
  • Expansion of early and late antlerless seasons in select counties.
  • Changes to regulations regarding wildlife rehabilitators.

In addition, the commission asked the DNR to move forward with:

  • An experimental mandatory antler point restriction regulation in a five-county CWD Core Area, including Ionia, Kent, Mecosta, Montcalm and Newaygo counties. The restriction would begin in 2019, provided a survey of hunters shows support for the requirement and specific department guidelines are met. This is intended as a tool to evaluate the effects of antler point restrictions on the spread and prevalence of CWD, along with deer population reduction.
  • A hunter-submitted proposal for mandatory antler point restrictions in Huron, Tuscola, Sanilac, St. Clair and Lapeer counties. If hunter surveys support this regulation and specific department guidelines are met, it would be implemented in 2019.

These regulations come after much collaborative work to better understand the scope and pathways of CWD and best management actions. In October 2017, Michigan hosted a CWD symposium that brought together roughly 200 wildlife scientists and other experts from across the country.

Recommendations and public outreach

Shortly after the symposium, the DNR and the Natural Resources Commission announced the creation of a nine-member Chronic Wasting Disease Working Group. This group was charged with developing recommendations on additional steps and actions to substantially mitigate CWD in Michigan, and in January presented initial recommendations centered around messaging, partnership funding, regional management, and the importance of continuing a solid science-based approach.

Throughout April and May of this year, the DNR hosted a series of public engagement meetings in Bay City, Cadillac, Detroit, DeWitt, Gaylord, Houghton, Iron Mountain, Kalamazoo, Marquette, Newberry and Rockford. These meetings provided many opportunities for the DNR to share the latest information and recommendations about CWD, while encouraging the public to offer their best ideas on how to slow the disease.

During this outreach period, more than 650 peopled attend public engagement meetings, and the DNR received comments and suggestions via 361 hard-copy surveys and 135 online surveys.

More information on regulations

Details on all regulations will be added next week to the online hunting digests on the DNR website, and DNR staff will be available at deer-check stations during the hunting seasons, too.

More information about these regulations also will be posted next week to the michigan.gov/cwd website. For additional questions, contact the DNR Wildlife Division at 517-284-9453.

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Cedar Springs Community Players presents Alice In Wonderland, Jr.  

 Alice and her madcap friends are coming to the Kent Theatre on August 18, 19 and 20. Join them as they travel down the rabbit hole and experience their adventures in Wonderland. 

This musical is based upon Disney’s adaptation of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.  Carroll was noted for his skill at word play, logic and fantasy. During Alice’s encounter with the tree loving Cheshire Cat, Alice inquires:  “Would you tell me please, which way I ought to go from here?” 

“That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,” replies the Cat.  

A listless Alice responds, “I don’t much care where.” 

The Cat then inquires, “Then it doesn’t much matter which way you go?”  

“So long as I get somewhere,” Alice states.  

Then the clever Cheshire Cat logically replies, “Oh you’re sure to do that if only you walk long enough.”

The young actors in this production include Natalie Schneider as Alice and Kateri Schneider as Small Alice.  Grace Berlin, Emily Ranschaert and Lauren David play Cheshire Cats. Heidi Ranschaert plays Mathilda; Ava Koester, the White Rabbit; Thomas Prina, the Doorknob; and Sienna Koester, the Dodo Bird.   Tweddle Dum and Tweddle Dee are played by Carol Olvera and Maggie Prina.  Eli Koester plays the Caterpillar; Willow Didlauskas the Mad Hatter; and Maddison Jenema the March Hare. Lydia Olivera is joined by Ben Flickinger as Queen and King of Hearts.  The beautiful singing flowers are played by Sage Sidlauskas, Anna Olvera, Chloe Kerrish, Avery Jennings and Lydia Morey. The chorus is made up of Lilly Scott, Elizabeth Jahns, Jesse Ranschaert, Monica Cole, Hannah Cole, Jordyn Kerrish, Lilly Wood, Olivia Wilbur and Jacob Ziolksowski.  Technical Assistants are Violet Sidluakas, Alyssa Cole, Oliva Cole.  Art Director and Prop Master are Heidi Ranschaert and Nolan Patin. Lighting Designer is Zach Koester.  The play is directed by Lori Koester with her children, Ava and Eli serving as assistant directors, choreographer and music director.

“We are so fortunate to have the Cedar Springs Community Players and Kent Theatre in our community,” noted Scott Phillips, President of the Community Players. “Together these two non-profit groups offer a platform for families to join together and create entertainment for our community. This production of Alice in Wonderland Jr. involves actors and families not only from our local area, but many Grand Rapids families come out to participate. While Lori oversees the production, she has done a fantastic job of allowing the young actors to participate in everything from lighting, directing, and choregraphing the dance scenes. It is truly a great family experience and I encourage people join.”

Show times are August 17 and 18 at 7:00 p.m. and August 19, 2018 at 2:00 p.m.  Tickets are $12 for adult and $5.00 for 18 years and younger. Tickets may be purchased at the Kent Theatre. For information on becoming a part of the Cedar Springs Community Players, please visit our Facebook Page or our website at cedarspringscommunityplayers.org.    

Upcoming auditions for the Players’ October performance of “Arsenic and Old Lace” will be held at the Cedar Springs United Methodist Church August 22 and 23, 2018 from 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. Cast includes 3 women and 11 men, several of which are minor roles providing an opportunity for aspiring actors to try out and experience community theatre. Technical positions are also available. Performances for “Arsenic and Old Lace” will be October 18, 19 and 20, 2018.

 

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Crash sends elderly couple to hospital

Post photo by J. Reed.

Post photo by J. Reed.

By Judy Reed

An elderly Grand Rapids couple was injured Wednesday after their vehicle ran a stop sign and was hit by another vehicle at Edgerton and 14 Mile Road.

According to the Kent County Sheriff Department, they were called to the scene of the crash at 5:20 p.m. August 8. 

The investigation showed that a Ford Focus, driven by an 83-year-old Grand Rapids woman, was traveling northbound on Edgerton and failed to stop at the sign at 14 Mile Road. A Ford Taurus, occupied by a Cedar Springs couple, was traveling westbound on 14 Mile Rd, and hit the Focus in the passenger side.

Both the 83-year-old woman and her passenger, a 90-year-old male, were transported to Spectrum Butterworth Hospital by Rockford Ambulance with possible internal injuries.

The male driver of the Taurus complained of a wrist injury, and his wife complained of a possible ankle injury. They went to Spectrum United Hospital in Greenville by private transport to be checked out. 

Algoma Fire and Rescue assisted at the scene.

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Firefighter discovers fire at local business

Firefighters work to put out a fire at RMS Refrigeration last Friday, August 3. Post photo by J. Reed.

By Judy Reed

The last thing Lt. Jason Clauser of the Algoma Fire Department expected to see when he crested the hill on White Creek Avenue between Russell Road and 14 Mile about 6:30 p.m. last Friday, August 3, was smoke and flames from a business there.

“It was kind of a unique situation,” he explained. “I was driving by and saw some black smoke and then saw flames from the east side of the building,” he said, referring to a storage facility used by RMS Refrigeration, an HVAC contractor at 11800 White Creek Avenue.

Clauser called it in, and was in charge at the scene when other units arrived. There were seven fire departments at the scene. Assisting Algoma was Cedar Springs Fire, Rockford Fire, Solon Fire, Grattan Fire, Courtland Fire, and Sparta Fire. Rockford Ambulance was also on scene if needed.

Clauser said the fire started on the east side and got up into the roof and rafters. “When it got into the ceiling it got into the insulation so we had to pull the ceiling down because the tiniest spark could cause it to rekindle,” he explained. They also had to tear off some of the siding from the outside.

The cause of the fire was undetermined.

After first arriving, Clauser said they cut open the door and were able to back out a work truck from the facility. “The owner was super grateful for that because it enabled his business to keep functioning,” he said.

Clauser said they cleared the scene by about 10 p.m.

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