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Red Hawks stand tough against Greenville

The Red Hawks held the Yellow Jackets to only 7 points last Friday night at Red Hawk Stadium.

The Red Hawks run back out onto the field after half time, ready to take on the Yellow Jackets in the third and fourth quarters.

By Kayleigh Boomgaard

Under the Friday night lights of September 8, the Red Hawk varsity football team took on the Greenville Yellow Jackets in their third game of the season and brought in a win on their own turf 48-7.

After both the Cedar Springs freshman and junior varsity football teams defeated the Jackets on Thursday evening, the varsity boys were determined to continue the winning streak.

Senior fullback John Jacob Todd scored the first touchdown of the night with 8:30 to play in the first quarter. Todd ran up the middle for 20 yards and completed his run into the end zone, starting the game off on a good foot.

Junior halfback Ryan Ringler finished off the play with a two-point conversion, bringing the score to Cedar Springs 8, Greenville 0.

Todd scored three additional touchdowns during the game, and a two-point conversion in the second quarter, after securing a pass thrown by senior quarterback Nicholas Campione.

Senior halfback Darius Barnett, whose second touchdown consisted of a short pass by Campione and a 53-yard run, put up additional points for the Red Hawks.

Campione assisted one touchdown and two two-point conversions, and made key passes on multiple occasions to contribute to the team’s win.

In the third quarter, shortly after returning from halftime, Greenville junior Ryan Burden ran a reverse left and scored his team’s only touchdown of the night. The touchdown was followed by a PAT (point after touchdown) kicked by Greenville player Bryce Priebe.

The first conference game of the season for the Red Hawks concluded with a winning score of Cedar Springs 48, Greenville 7.

To see the results of the upcoming game, support the Cedar Springs varsity football team at the Northview Wildcat’s stadium on Friday, September 15. Game time is 7 p.m.

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Seussical, Jr.

Over two dozen kids from ages 7 to 14 have worked hard to bring Suessical, Jr. to the stage at the Kent Theatre Sept. 22-24. Photo by Linda Christiansen.

By Tom Noreen

The Cedar Springs Community Players will present Seussical, Jr. on September 22-23 at 7 p.m. and a September 24 matinee at 2:30 p.m. at the historic Kent Theatre.

Directed by Lori Koester, with musical Director Eli Koester, 27 kids from 7 to 14 will perform. In addition to acting, they are helping prepare the set by painting all of the props and background scenery. Eli knows how to teach the music to the kids, plus he plays Horton.

Seussical is a musical by Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty based on the stories of Dr. Seuss (mainly Horton Hears a Who!Horton Hatches the Egg and Miss Gertrude McFuzz) that debuted on Broadway in 2000. The play’s story is a complex amalgamation of many of Seuss’s most famous books. Seussical, Jr. is written especially for youth performers.

Tickets are $10 at the door and can be reserved by emailing ticketscscp@gmail.com.

Look for the CSCP’s next show, Harvey, scheduled for October.

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City to consider beekeeping ordinance

By Judy Reed

The City of Cedar Springs may soon join the ranks of other progressive cities that are helping to support the environment by allowing residents to keep bees. The City Council will consider the first reading of the ordinance at their monthly meeting this Thursday, September 7.

City resident Joe Frank asked the city to consider allowing beekeeping in the city earlier this summer. He has kept honeybees as a hobby for several years. He had several hives on property he owned in Hesperia, and when he decided to sell the property, he re-homed all of the hives, except one, with other beekeepers. He had previously asked a city official if he could keep a hive on his property here, and was told he could. He moved the hive to his property, but was later told that he couldn’t have it under the current ordinance. That ordinance, Sec. 8-1 Domestic Animals and Fowls reads: “No person shall keep or house any animal or domestic fowl within the city, except dogs, cats, canaries or animals commonly classified as pets which are customarily kept or housed inside dwellings as household pets, or permit any animal or fowl to enter business places where food is sold for human consumption, except for leader, guide, hearing and service dogs as required by MCL 750.502c.”

“Bees are animals and no animals shall be kept except for the ones listed or are commonly classified as pets, which bees are not,” explained City Manager Mike Womack.

Womack gave the council a copy of the beekeeping ordinance in Traverse City, and a draft ordinance for the Planning Commission and City Council to consider.

This green box is Frank’s beehive, and the two white boxes are honey supers, which collect honey. Courtesy photo.

Frank’s hive is a green box inside a shed on his property. There are ports from the hive for the bees to travel through to get outside. They do not fly around inside the shed.

“They are not dangerous,” he explained. “There are already bees flying around outside. They have to live somewhere. Better in a hive than in the wall of your garage,” he noted.

At the August 10 council meeting, former Mayor Mark Fankhauser stated that he supports and recommends allowing bees in the city. He said he has seen a direct increase in the number of flowers as a result of Frank’s bees.

According to Ranger Steve Mueller, our resident wildlife and biology expert, bees are more important than butterflies as pollinators and are not dangerous. “Bees are experiencing population decline for a variety of reasons and can use human help. They are of great positive economic importance. People have an unreasonable fear of bees. Riding or driving in a car is a greater health threat than bees in the neighborhood. Why people develop unhealthy fear of bees and other insects makes little sense but many are taught unreasonable fear as a child and hold on to those fears throughout life,” he explained.

“[Bees] are a community-building, economic resource that benefits people, plants, and wildlife. I encourage people to maintain a portion of their yard for wildflowers and native species to help maintain and sustain biodiversity. Bees are an essential component if we want plants to reproduce,” he remarked.

Mueller said he has a friend that lives close to downtown Denver, Colorado and she has a small beehive in her backyard. “The bees fly about the city in nearby areas pollinating flowers, gathering nectar, and make honey. We eat at their picnic table in the backyard and are not disturbed by bees. We watch them at flowers in the garden that surround the picnic table. We sit on their deck to enjoy the day and have had not problems with the bees that are about 30 feet away. She suits up to open the hive to extract honey and uses normal bee keeping practices for safety,” he said.

Under the proposed ordinance, residents would need to apply for a permit. They could keep no more than a total of two hives on real property less than 10,890 square feet, no more than 4 hives on real property less than 21,780 square feet, no more than 6 hives on real property less than 43,560 square feet and no more than eight hives on real property more than 43,561 square feet. Honeybees must be housed in a properly designed and constructed hive, which may be located only in the “rear yard” of the property. They also cannot be any closer than 10 feet to any property line of an adjacent property.

Frank said he was happy with the draft ordinance the council is considering.

“The State of Michigan has guidelines for beekeeping and the proposal is in line with the State of Michigan Agriculture guidelines, which I think is a good way to go,” he said.

A few of the other cities that allow bees in West Michigan include Grand Rapids, Muskegon, and Holland.

Please note that this article has been updated to refer to the specific ordinance under which bees are not currently allowed in the City of Cedar Springs. We also removed Rockford as a city that allows them. It should have read Muskegon. We apologize for the error.

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Post travels to Big Bay

The Post recently traveled with Art and Linda Gould, of Nelson Township, to Big Bay, Michigan, on the shores of Lake Superior. They went there to visit with friends. While there, the couple said they had good weather and a good time.

Thank you Art and Linda, for taking us with you!

Are you going on vacation? Take the Post with you and snap some photos. Then send them to us with some info to news@cedarspringspost.com or mail them to Post travels, PO Box 370, Cedar Springs, MI 49319. We will be looking for yours!

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Cedar Springs hires four new principals for elementaries

From L to R: Carol Franz (Cedar View); Tricia Shenefield (Beach); Beth Whaley (Cedar Trails); and Miranda Latimer (Red Hawk). Courtesy photo.

Kids returned to school on Tuesday, September 5, and those in kindergarten through fifth grade were welcomed by new principals at each of the four elementary schools.

“Each of the principals come to us with great education and experience and will fit well with our dynamic team of students, families, staff and administration,” said Dr. Laura Vanduyn, Superintendent.

The school supplied the following information on each principal:

Our new Cedar Trails principal is Ms. Beth Whaley. Ms. Whaley comes to us as an experienced principal, most recently at an early childhood and Kindergarten center. Prior to that she served as Early Childhood Director and Specialist at the ISD and district level. She was a GSRP leader and Parents as Teachers assistant and teacher. Ms. Whaley comes to us with awards from both Michigan State and University of Michigan (Summa cum Laude at both as well as Magna cum Laude at MSU in her undergraduate work). Beth holds a Bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education, a Master’s degree in Early Childhood Education and Michigan School Administrator Certificate.

Our new Beach principal is Ms. Tricia Shenefield. Ms. Shenefield comes to us as an experienced principal for many years in Grand Rapids Public Schools. Prior to that Ms. Shenefield was an assistant principal and a teacher. Ms. Shenefield shared in two interviews that she loves data. She has co-authored curriculum, served as a math teacher leader and implemented PLCs. Tricia and her staff are an accomplished team that had the highest ELA M-STEP proficiency among 13 K-5 schools in GRPS. Ms. Shenefield holds a Bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education, a Master’s degree in Educational Leadership and Michigan School Administrator Certificate.

Our new Cedar View principal is Ms. Carol Franz. Ms. Franz comes to us with several years experience as a 5th-8th grade school principal. Prior to that Ms. Franz was a Program Coordinator for 21st Century Programs, MTSS District Coach, Discipline Coordinator and teacher. Ms. Franz has been instrumental in implementing several initiatives such as PBIS, MiBLISI, and Response to Intervention. Ms. Franz has presented at the state level and has received many awards, such as the Make a Difference Award (student nominated) for several consecutive years. Ms. Franz holds a Bachelor’s degree (MSU highest honors), a Master’s degree in teaching, an Education Specialist degree in school administration, and Michigan School Administrator Certificate.

Our new Red Hawk principal is Ms. Miranda Latimer. Miranda is not new to CSPS as she is well known for being an outstanding teacher of our wonderful CSPS 4th and 5th graders for 15 years. However, she is new to Red Hawk and wilI certainly know many 6th graders as she had some of them in class! Ms. Latimer was the “Leader in Training” last year at Beach Elementary School. She was instrumental in working alongside a mentor, Dr. Barb Johnson, (a National Blue Ribbon School principal and a Michigan Top 10 Schools principal) with staff and students to implement the Reading Now Network (RNN). The RNN is a highly sought, research-based Michigan initiative that is effective in improving reading and literacy at the elementary level. Ms. Latimer proved her skills and talents as a leader in training and will now be a building principal. She will apply her many years of experience with the upper elementary level students to our focused and unique 6th-grade site. Ms. Latimer holds a Bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education, a Master’s degree in Administration and Leadership, and Michigan School Administrator Certificate.

“Please join me in a warm Cedar Springs welcome to our principals,” said VanDuyn. “I know you’ll enjoy meeting them and working with them this year. I welcome you, in advance, to this school year; it’s going to be another great year!”

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Maddie Brown named NCAA player of the week

Maddie Brown, a Grace Bible College sophomore from Cedar Springs, Michigan, and graduate of Mount Pleasant High School, has been named Student Athlete of the Week by the NCCAA for her performance in the Tigers’ season-opening week of women’s soccer.
Brown scored the Tigers’ first ever goal against Aquinas College to take a 1-0 lead in an eventual 3-1 defeat on Tuesday night. Brown then scored 2 goals to lead Grace Bible College in a 4-2 win over Holy Cross College. On the week, Brown had 10 shots with 8 on goal.

Maddie is the daughter of Pastor Chad and Tracy Brown, of Cedar Springs.

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River Rock Church hosts annual summer festival September 10

Entire community invited to free event with something for everyone 

On Sunday, September 10, River Rock Church will host their annual summer Festival event from 3-6 p.m. The event, which is completely free of charge, will take place on the grounds of River Rock Church at 6060 Belding Road, Rockford, Mich.

River Rock’s Festival event is an opportunity for the greater community to come together and simply have fun. What can you expect to do at Festival? Kids can enjoy inflatables, many kid’s games, face painting, pony rides, a petting zoo, a clown, prizes such as an American Girl Doll and electric scooter and more. But Festival isn’t just for kids! Adults who attend can listen to live music, learn to square dance, and new this year, play a game of bubble soccer thanks to Grand Rapids Battle Ball.

Festival is free to attend but guests are invited to bring a nonperishable food item to support Hand2Hand Ministries, which delivers hope to hungry children—early childhood through high school—by mobilizing schools and churches to provide nutritious food over the weekends. Hand2Hand is active in Rockford Public Schools.

In 2016, River Rock welcomed approximately 800 people to Festival. And while a great turnout is expected, the true goal is to give back to the community.

“Since our beginning in 2000, River Rock Church has existed to prayerfully connect those in the greater Rockford community to Jesus and one another. We seek to do this in a variety of ways including worship services, serving opportunities inside and outside of our church, programming for all ages, and community outreach events like Festival,” said River Rock’s Senior Pastor, Jon Huizenga. “Festival is something we can give back to the community who has blessed our church in so many ways.”

For more information on River Rock’s Festival, visit www.riverrockcommunity.com or contact the church office at 616-874-0400.

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Hurricane Harvey: how you can help

Soldiers with the Texas Army National Guard move through flooded Houston streets as floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey continue to rise, Monday, August 28, 2017. More than 12,000 members of the Texas National Guard have been called out to support local authorities in response to the storm.

By Judy Reed

Hurricane Harvey swept into Texas last weekend, and at least 25 people have died as the storm battered the southeast region of Texas and nearby Louisiana. Houston has been hit especially hard. Floodwaters have begun to recede, but thousands of people and pets have been left homeless in the storm’s wake. Some 18,000 people have been rescued from the flooding in SE Texas; at least 32,000 people are in shelters, with thousands more seeking to get in.

How can you help?

Hurricane Helping Hands: There are some people right here in Cedar Springs organizing relief for both humans and their pets. Friends Jamie Garcia, Melissa Lombard, and Tiffany Rop are asking for physical donations—not monetary—though gas cards would be accepted. Jamie will be driving some things down to Texas, and someone else has offered one or two semi tractor trailer to drive items down. There are many items needed such as flashlights, batteries, lanterns, socks, bandaids, trash bags, toilet paper, biodegradable wipes, rubber gloves, peanut butter, etc. Please see their Facebook page for the entire list. https://www.facebook.com/HurricaneHelpingHands/

Melissa posted on the Facebook page that there is also a big need for baby items—formula, diapers, wipes, etc. They are also putting together personal care packs and are in need of combs, razors, pads/tampons, tissues, toothbrushes, hair ties, etc. She is also making natural soap to go into the bags, so is looking for donations of lard, coconut oil, sunflower oil and olive oil, but would need those this week. Her goal is to make 100 pounds of soap.

The friends are also collecting items for pets that have been rescued.

The Post will have a drop box for donations, and other drop off points will be announced on their Facebook page. Please email them or send a message through their Facebook page for more information.

Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund: https://ghcf.org/hurricane-relief/ Mayor Sylvester Turner has established the Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund that will accept tax-deductible flood relief donations for victims that have been affected by the recent floods. The fund will be housed at the Greater Houston Community Foundation, a 501(c)(3) public charity.

Workers with the Houston Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals rescue a horse in rising floodwaters.

Houston Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals: The Houston SPCA is the lead nonprofit animal-related agency responsible for disaster rescue, recovery and relief efforts. You can donate online at http://www.houstonspca.org/.

UMCOR – The United Methodist Committee on Relief is currently working with disaster coordinators and early response teams in Louisiana and Texas to provide relief to the many people whose lives have been impacted by hurricane/tropical storm Harvey. They give you five things you can do at http://www.umcor.org/umcor/resources/news-stories/2017/august/0825umcorrespondstoharvey. One is to make relief kits. You can download the packing list and shipping label from their website. You can also donate online or by mail.

Save the children: This organization is delivering family-friendly relief supplies including cribs, strollers, changing tables, baby shampoo, diapers and baby-safe portable tubs. They are also setting up child-friendly spaces in shelters where kids can play and learn while parents manage their family’s emergency needs. Go to www.savethechildren.org to learn more and to donate.

American Red Cross: Visit the American Red Cross at www.redcross.org to donate.

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The Post travels to Kentucky

The Post went with Phil and Sue Harrison, of Nelson Township, to the American TriFive Nationals in Bowling Green, Kentucky on August 10-12, 2017. This is the 60th anniversary of the 1957 Chevy. Sue and Phil drove their 1957 Chevy convertible over 1,162 round trip miles to join the 2,717 other 1955, ‘56, ‘57 Chevys at the convention.

That sounds like fun! Thank you Phil and Sue, for taking us with you!

Are you going on vacation? Take the Post with you and snap some photos. Then send them to us with some info to news@cedarspringspost.com or mail them to Post travels, PO Box 370, Cedar Springs, MI 49319. We will be looking for yours!

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Milestone achieved for family farm

Pictured from left to right: Andrew, Noah, and Nate Reyburn, Larry, Janice, and Dean Reyburn.

Shining white and tall with the gold and green insert, the new Centennial Farm sign in front of 2727 Indian Lakes Rd., Cedar Springs proudly displays an important milestone for the Reyburn Family.

In 1916, Orange and Etta Burnap (the current owner’s grandparents) purchased the farm, which was sold to Shelby and Edith Reyburn (Orange’s daughter and son-in-law), then sold to Walter and Genevie Penrose (Shelby’s daughter and son-in-law), and finally to current owners Shelby L. (Larry) and Janice Reyburn (Shelby’s son and daughter-in law).

The beautiful acreage at Shady Grove Farm reaches from Indian Lakes Rd. to the Consumers Power lines, and has hosted apple orchards, fields of soybeans or corn, flowers, vegetables, pumpkins, tomatoes, and deep shady woods. There is a well-kept old wooden barn with several outbuildings, and two homes.

Larry grew up here on this property, and throughout the years he spent in the Michigan State Police it always called him back. He purchased the farm from his sister and brother-in-law in 1968. Even though he worked and lived wherever he was posted, he returned to tend the orchards and work the land.

After his retirement in 1982 from the State Police until 2000, Larry and Janice concentrated on their flower business, growing, drying, arranging, and selling beautiful bouquets at fairs across the state. Currently they grow pumpkins, sweet corn, tomatoes, and other vegetables, which are sold right at the farm.

Larry and Janice would tell you that they are blessed by God and are proud to continue the 100-plus year heritage of this beautiful farm.

 

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