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Local athlete signs with Davenport University

Caden Burrows signed a letter of intent last week to play football for Davenport University.

Caden Burrows signed a letter of intent last week to play football for Davenport University.

Cedar Springs senior Caden Burrows, who played center for the Red Hawk Varsity football team, signed his letter of intent, on February 4, to play football for the newly formed Davenport University Panther football program.

Caden, the son of Tim and Kim Burrows, cited hard work, his early years in the Cedar Springs Rocket Football Program, and all the coaches he has had through the years—from rocket to Varsity—as the reasons for this accomplishment.

Caden takes pride in his Cedar Springs heritage and and also referenced the importance of friends, teammates, sports families, and the crowd’s continued support of Cedar Springs’ athletics. “Cedar Springs is the place I’m proud to call home,” he said.

Varsity Coach Gus Kapolka had high praise for his center. “Caden is hands down one of the best leaders I’ve been associated with,” remarked Kapolka. “His work ethic and off-field demeanor served as an example to all the players in our program, as to how a champion conducts himself. He played against some really good, highly recruited players this year and held his own. He was the cornerstone of our success. I believe Davenport is very lucky to sign Caden.”

Caden said he would be studying to get a degree in sports management at Davenport.

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Affordable health screenings 

 

HEA-LifeLineScreeningFebruary 28, at Solon Center Wesleyan

Residents living in and around the Cedar Springs, Michigan can learn about their risk for cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, diabetes, and other chronic, serious conditions with affordable screenings by Life Line Screening. Solon Center Wesleyan Church will host this community event on Saturday, February 28. The site is located at 15671 Algoma in Cedar Springs.  Steve Hennigar of Oscoda, MI attended a Life Line Screening and said, “I’m sure Life Line Screening saved my life.”

Screenings can check for:

  • The level of plaque buildup in your arteries, related to risk for heart disease, stroke and overall vascular health.
  • HDL and LDL Cholesterol levels
  • Diabetes risk
  • Bone density as a risk for possible osteoporosis
  • Kidney and thyroid function, and more

Screenings are affordable, convenient and accessible for wheelchairs and those with trouble walking. Free parking is also available.

Packages start at $149, but consultants will work with you to create a package that is right for you based on your age and risk factors. Call 1-877-237-1287 or visit our website at www.lifelinescreening.com. Pre-registration is required.

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Winter storm drops 10 inches of snow

Snow piled up on Main Street on Monday after Sunday’s storm. Post photo by J. Reed.

Snow piled up on Main Street on Monday after Sunday’s storm. Post photo by J. Reed.

Blowing, drifting and plowed snow surrounded The Springs Church parking lot Monday at First and Maple Streets. Post photo by J. Reed.

Blowing, drifting and plowed snow surrounded The Springs Church parking lot Monday at First and Maple Streets. Post photo by J. Reed.

February 2015 introduced itself Sunday with a winter blast that saw storm warnings issued across the Midwest from Iowa to the Great Lakes to New York.

The National Weather Service in Grand Rapids reported that the heaviest snow fell across northern Illinois, northern Indiana, and southern Lower Michigan. Grand Rapids and Cedar Springs were in a medium band and saw 8-10 inches of snow. A resident on Berrigan Ave reported 10 inches to the Post. Counties south and south east of us saw up to 18 inches, while counties to the north saw 4 to 6 inches.

This storm was the 5th largest snowstorm on record for Chicago, where 19.3 inches fell. Winds increased on the afternoon and evening of February 1, gusting to 30-35 mph across Lower Michigan. The wind was a significant factor in creating blowing snow, very low visibilities, and deep drifts. Arctic air wrapped in behind the storm system and skies cleared during the early morning hours of February 2, resulting in low temperatures in the single digits with wind chills down to -10 to -15 degrees.

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Beauty and the Beast starts tonight

 

Shows Feb. 5-8 at Cedar Springs High School

Alexis Lucarelli as Belle reading to Brandyn Kirchoff as the Beast.

Alexis Lucarelli as Belle reading to Brandyn Kirchoff as the Beast.

It’s almost Valentine’s Day and love is in the air, along with some good old-fashioned fun, as over 60 cast members take the stage tonight at Cedar Springs High School for their winter musical, Beauty and the Beast. 

This classic tale is a charming love story about a young woman (Belle) who falls in love with a beast, who happens to be a prince placed under a spell. In order to escape the spell, the Beast must learn to love and be loved. If he doesn’t learn this before time runs out, he and his home will be under the spell forever.

Remington Sawade as Gaston performing with many of the cast members.

Remington Sawade as Gaston performing with many of the cast members.

Leads include Alexis Lucarelli as Belle; Sean Murphy as Maurice; Brandyn Kirchoff as Beast/Prince; Remington Sawade as Gaston; Dallas Mora as Lefou; Alec Falicki as Lumiere; Roland Nulph as Cogsworth; April Roberts as Mrs. Potts; and Sam Owens as Babette.

Shows are February 5, 6, and 7 at 7:00 p.m., with matinees on February 7 and 8 at 1:00 p.m. in the high school auditorium. Tickets are $10, and can be bought at the high school main office, online at http://www.hprodcshs.com, and at the door.

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Show birds some love on Valentine’s weekend

Snowy Owl. Diane McAllister-GBBC

Snowy Owl. Diane McAllister-GBBC

Join the Great Backyard Bird Count

Give Mother Nature a valentine this year and show how much you care about birds by counting them for the Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC). The 18th annual count is taking place February 13 through 16. Anyone in the world can count birds at any location for at least 15 minutes on one or more days of the count and enter their sightings at www.BirdCount.org. The information gathered by tens of thousands of volunteers helps track changes in bird populations on a massive scale. The GBBC is a joint project of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society with partner Bird Studies Canada.

Common Redpoll. Missy Mandel-GBBC

Common Redpoll. Missy Mandel-GBBC

Bird watchers fell in love with the magnificent Snowy Owl during the last count when the birds were reported in unprecedented numbers across southeastern Canada, the Great Lakes states, the Northeast, and down the Atlantic Coast. Expect Snowy Owls to show up in higher numbers during this year’s GBBC, too.

“It’s called an ‘echo flight,’” explains Marshall Iliff, eBird Project Leader at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. “After a huge irruption like we had last winter, the following year often yields higher-than-usual numbers as well. The abundance of lemmings that produced last year’s Snowy Owl irruption likely continued or emerged in new areas of eastern Canada, more owls may have stayed east after last year’s irruption, and some of last year’s birds that came south are returning.”

“This may also be a big year for finches,” notes Audubon Chief Scientist Gary Langham. “GBBC participants in North America should be on the lookout for larger numbers of Pine Siskins and redpolls. These birds also push farther south when pine cone seed crops fail in the far north of Canada.”

Bird watchers from 135 countries participated in the 2014 count, documenting nearly 4,300 species on more than 144,000 bird checklists. That’s about 43 percent of all the bird species in the world! In addition to the U.S. and Canada, India, Australia, and Mexico led the way with the greatest number of checklists submitted.

“We especially want to encourage people to share their love of birds and bird watching with someone new this year,” says Dick Cannings at Bird Studies Canada. “Take your sweetheart, a child, a neighbor, or a coworker with you while you count birds for the GBBC. Share your passion and you may fledge a brand new bird watcher!”

The Great Backyard Bird Count is a great way for people of all ages and backgrounds to connect with nature and show some love for the birds this Valentine’s Day. Participation is free and easy. To learn more about how to join the count, download instructions, a slide show, web buttons, and other materials, visit www.birdcount.org. While you’re there, get inspired by the winning photos from the 2014 GBBC photo contest.

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Model T snowmobile 

Does anyone know who owns this Model T Ford snowmobile?

Does anyone know who owns this Model T Ford snowmobile?

Reader Olie Johnson got a photo of this unique vehicle heading north toward Sand Lake this week. Not many may have ever seen a Model T “snowmobile,” a name coined and copyrighted by Virgil D. White in 1917.

According to the Model T Ford snowmobile club online, White was a Ford dealer in Ossippee, New Hampshire and built his first snow attachment in 1913. He put it on the market in 1922, and sold the attachments through Ford dealers. Skis made of metal and wood and rear mounted tracks converted the cars into snow machines. They were used by anyone needing to get through snow—rural mail carriers, doctors, etc. Some photos show cars with only skis on the front, and others show cars with both tires and skis. The attachments were expensive—from $250 to $395, depending on the year and type of car.

White eventually sold the company to Farm Specialty Manufacturing Company of New Holstein, Wisconsin, which began to market its version of the product in 1926. It went out of business in 1929, and the factory burned shortly afterward.

Does anyone know who the Model T in the photo belongs to? Give us a call at 696-3655 or email us at news@cedarspringspost.com.

Update: We now know who the owner of the snowmobile is… watch for more in next week’s issue!

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What’s your Valentine’s Day personality? 

 

How anyone can make the day special

VAL-Valentines-Day-personality-web(BPT) – Whether you’re a hopeless romantic or you don’t believe in Cupid at all, everyone celebrates Valentine’s Day in their own special way. From a fancy date or a girls’ night in, to a festive class party with the kids, there are activities, and treats, to suit every type of Valentine’s personality out there. Which one are you?

The hopeless romantic

Do you wear your heart on your sleeve? Do you look forward to Valentine’s Day every year as a time to celebrate the people you love? Then you are a hopeless romantic and you embrace everything that Valentine’s Day stands for. For you, the day should be filled with thoughtful gestures that come from the heart.

Start by sending messages to the special people in your life. For a significant other, you might text famous romantic quotes throughout the day to show your love. Then, skip the expensive flowers and get crafty by making Sweetheart Roses with Hershey’s Kisses chocolates, which come in special pink and red foils for the holiday. Simply wrap two Kisses chocolates in cellophane or plastic wrap to create a rosebud shape and then attach your creation to florist wire and wrap it in green florist tape. Add a little note saying how much you care. This gift is a sweet treat and you won’t have to worry about it wilting.

The last-minute cupid

If you are the person who waits until the commute home to swing by the store for your sweetie’s gift, you are a last-minute cupid. You like Valentine’s Day, but you are not known to plan ahead. Fortunately, there’s no need to worry. Here are a few quick and impressive ideas for special gifts.

To start, a handwritten card is always appreciated. Simply say what’s in your heart; you don’t have to be Shakespeare. When the words are your own, your loved one will know you genuinely care. Next, attach a gift that signifies all the sweet things in life, like the Hershey’s Kisses Heart Shaped Tin, packed with Kisses milk chocolates, which is guaranteed to make her swoon. For more quick and fun Valentine Day’s ideas, visit www.CelebrateWithHersheys.com.

The class parent

In classrooms across the country, Valentine’s Day is a special time to celebrate friendship at school. If you’re the class mom or dad, you know the class will be counting on you to help the kids get ready for this special day and prepare all the cards and goodies.

Help students celebrate their friends by having them make their own cards. Use construction paper, ribbon, glitter and stickers to help your kids make customized cards for classmates, then add a sweet treat.

Parents can also start a new family tradition at home and show their kids how much they care by giving them Valentine’s Day baskets.

The playful platonic

If you think that Valentine’s Day is more fun spent with friends, then you have a playful platonic personality. You don’t need all the mushy over-the-top romanticism; you know the true loves of your life are your friends and you want to use this day to celebrate everything they mean to you.

For example, you might meet with your favorite buds for happy hour or spend the evening at home swapping manis and pedis with your best girlfriends. This is the perfect time to flip through some pictures and take a trip down memory lane. Make your home a festive oasis by filling a candy dish throughout the night.

No matter your Valentine’s Day personality, there are simple ways to make the day extra special. From yummy treats to sweet gestures, you’ll show the loved ones in your life you care—today and every day of the year.

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WMP wrestlers take home trophies

Lucus Pienton took first in the 13/14/15 open age group at GVSU.

Lucus Pienton took first in the 13/14/15 open age group at GVSU.

This past weekend’s Western Region tournament was held by Grand Valley State University, where West Michigan Pursuit traveled thru the crazy Michigan weather to compete. WMP took 23 grapplers to compete this weekend and placed 13 in the top three.

“I just want to thank the wrestlers’ who train under me, thank you for stepping out on the mat and working as hard as you do, you truly are the Pursuit of Champions,” said Owner and Head Coach Dave Andrus.

This week the team battled 67 times with 38 ending in victory. Results are as follows:

3rd Place Medalists include Casey Eberspeaker in the 7/8 Open age group in the 64 lb wt class.

2nd Place Medalists include and Gage Bowen in the 7/8 Open age group in the 82  lb wt class, Derek Egan in the 13/14/15 Novice age group in the 90/95 lb wt class, Luke Egan in the 7/8 Open age group in the 52 lb wt class, Jayden Marcano-Cruz in the 4/5/6 Novice age group in the 46 lb wt class, Kameron Ogden in the 7/8 Novice age group in the 52 lb wt class, Blake Peasley in the 7/8 Open age group in the 64 lb wt class and Maston Wood in the 9/10 age group in the 130 lb wt class.

Champions are Chayson Eberspeaker in the 4/5/6 age group in the 55 lb wt class, Landon Foss in the 7/8 Open age group in the 49/52 lb wt class (Portland Tournament), Lucus Pienton in the 13/14/15 Open age group in the 138 lb wt class, Zak Schmid in the 11/12 Open age group in the 133 lb wt class and Josh Vasquez in the 7/8 Open age group in the 52 lb wt class. Special Recognition to Zak Schmid who remains undefeated.

If you are interested in learning more about this sport or if your wrestler is looking to compete at the next level, check out West Michigan Pursuit. We are located at the Cedar Springs Sports Plex, practices are Tuesday and Thursday from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

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Get hooked on ice fishing 

Kyle Draper shows off a yellow perch (that he caught at an ice-fishing clinic at the DNR’s Carl T. Johnson Hunting and Fishing Center) to his mom, Angie. 
Michigan DNR photo.

Kyle Draper shows off a yellow perch (that he caught at an ice-fishing clinic at the DNR’s Carl T. Johnson Hunting and Fishing Center) to his mom, Angie. 
Michigan DNR photo.

From the Michigan DNR

Fishing is a year-round activity and when the thermometer plunges below freezing in Michigan, most anglers have little choice but to hit the hard water. Ice fishing becomes the go-to activity until spring.

For beginning anglers, ice fishing offers one significant advantage: access. Boat-less anglers, who otherwise are limited to shorelines or fishing piers much of the year, can often access entire lakes. That inspires some anglers to proclaim that ice-fishing season is their favorite time of year.

Fortunately, ice fishing can be relatively simple. All that’s needed to start is a way to make a hole in the ice (an auger or spud), a way to clear the slush from it (an inexpensive scoop), and rudimentary equipment. So, how do you get started?

A volunteer instructor shops a young angler how to use a weight at an ice-fishing clinic at the DNR’s Carl T. Johnson Hunting and Fishing Center. Michigan DNR photo.

A volunteer instructor shops a young angler how to use a weight at an ice-fishing clinic at the DNR’s Carl T. Johnson Hunting and Fishing Center. Michigan DNR photo.

There’s a good opportunity coming soon. Feb.14-15 is Michigan’s annual Winter Free Fishing Weekend, when no license is needed to participate. There are hands-on educational events scheduled at a number of areas. In addition, the Carl T. Johnson Hunting and Fishing Center in Cadillac holds on-the-ice fishing events every Saturday at noon. Novice anglers often can find assistance nearby. Tom Goniea, a fisheries biologist at the Department of Natural Resources, says finding a mentor helps shorten the learning curve.

“Ask around,” Goniea said. “Ask the guys at work or the folks at church. Ice fishermen make up a community that’s usually quite willing to introduce others to the sport. And most ice fishermen have enough equipment that they can get you started if you go with them so you can see what you need.”

DNR fisheries biologist Christian LeSage agrees.
“There‘s a big social component to ice fishing,” he said. “When you get out on the ice people are usually friendly; they’re willing to tell you what they’re doing, what they’re using, and how they’re catching fish.”

Except for largemouth and smallmouth bass—bass season closes Jan. 1 and doesn’t completely reopen until the Saturday before Memorial Day—anglers who ice fish can pursue all species they target the rest of the year. Ice fishing can range from fishing for panfish on a farm pond to making miles-long sojourns on the Great Lakes in pursuit of walleyes, lake trout or other top-of-the-food-chain predators.

LeSage recommends people start with panfish. He likes bluegills.
“You can try it on a small pond in a park,” he said. “And you don’t need extravagant gear. If you go places where people have been fishing, you don’t even need an auger – you can reopen a hole with a hammer. “Most veteran fishermen know that the best fishing is at dawn and dusk, but you can catch bluegills throughout the day. You can catch them in shallow water. You can catch a lot in a small area. And they’re delicious.”

What’s nicest about bluegills is that they can be found almost everywhere and, as fishing quarry, are relatively unsophisticated. All you need is a basic gear. Small fiberglass rods with simple, spring-tension spoons can be yours for less than $10 and you will see accomplished ice anglers using them. Add some light line, a few low-cost teardrops (small weighted hooks) and a container of insect larvae (wax worms or spikes, the early life stages of bee moths or flies, respectively) and you’re in business. Lower your bait to the bottom, begin slowly working it upward in the water column until you start getting bites, and then fish at that depth. It can (and does) get much more complicated with expensive rods, sonar fish finders, and a plethora of other equipment. But many anglers never acquire all that gear and continue to enjoy productive bluegill fishing.

As you progress in the sport and explore other ice-fishing opportunities, the equation becomes decidedly more complex. Get addicted to walleye fishing and you’ll be into snowmobile or quad runners, insulated ice shanties, GPS, underwater cameras, the list is endless.

But some factors never change: The first rule of ice fishing is to be safe. Good, strong ice can support a semi-truck, but every year there are tragedies that often involve recklessness. Make sure the ice is safe. Even arctic temperatures won’t guarantee it, especially if there’s an insulating layer of snow on top. You can get up-to-date info from bait shops around fishing locales, but always make sure yourself. Carry a spud to test the ice in front of you as you venture forth. Don’t approach ice that is discolored or has objects (such as vegetation or timber) protruding through it. Be especially careful of rivers (current can degrade ice quickly) or spring-fed lakes and ponds where warmer water can cause thin spots in an otherwise solid surface.

Always carry basic emergency gear, just in case. Ice picks (or homemade alternatives constructed of nails in dowels) will give you a way to get purchase on the ice should you break through. Carry a rope to toss to someone else who breaks through.

It’s better—some would say mandatory—not to go alone. You certainly don’t want to head miles off shore at Saginaw Bay, say, or Little Bay de Noc, without a partner. Always make sure someone knows where you are going and when you plan to return. Carry your cell phone.

Make sure you dress for the weather. Dress in layers from head to toe. The best way to keep your feet warm is to keep your head warm, and a waterproof outer layer is advisable. Small luxuries such as extra gloves and hand warmers often pay large dividends.
Ice fishing isn’t for everybody. But if you look around in the winter and see the huge shanty towns that spring up on some of Michigan’s best fishing lakes, it’s obvious that a lot of people are having a lot of fun out there. It isn’t that difficult to become one of them.
For more information on ice fishing, visit the DNR’s website at www.michigan.gov/fishing.

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The Blizzard of ‘78

This photo, taken by Ed Bremer, shows the snow on Main Street in Cedar Springs after the 1978 blizzard.

This photo, taken by Ed Bremer, shows the snow on Main Street in Cedar Springs after the 1978 blizzard.

Do you remember THE BLIZZARD? When people who remember it talk about it, it’s usually with a kind of awe. And with good reason—meteorologist Bill Steffen said on his blog that  “The Blizzard of 1978 ranks as the #1 snowstorm ever for Grand Rapids and much of Lower Michigan, Indiana and Ohio.” This past Monday, January 26, marked the 37th anniversary of that memorable snowstorm, when Grand Rapids received 15 inches of snow in 15 hours, with 19.2 inches total. Muskegon received 52 inches over four days, and Traverse City 28 inches. Over 100,000 vehicles were abandoned on highways in Michigan, and more than 20 people died, many of exposure. Schools were canceled for several days, but the snow lingered well into March, with some drifts 15 feet high.

What do you remember about the blizzard of 1978? Do you know how much snow fell here? Did you abandon your car? Tell us on our Facebook page, comment on our story on our website, or email us at news@cedarspringspost.com.

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