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Runners rest in Cedar Springs

 

Running teams represented include JFR (Grand Rapids), All Night Express (Kalamazoo), Cross Train (Macomb Township/Detroit), Rat Pig Lover Railroad (Grand Rapids and Kalamazoo) along with CTA workers.

Running teams represented include JFR (Grand Rapids), All Night Express (Kalamazoo), Cross Train (Macomb Township/Detroit), Rat Pig Lover Railroad (Grand Rapids and Kalamazoo) along with CTA workers.

The Cedar Springs White Pine Trail staging area provided a resting and revitalization point for the 2016 Fred 200/100 Mile Running Relay participants on Saturday, August 6. The overnight relay included 36 “spurs” or legs each ranging from two to 9.5 miles in distance, spanning the entire Fred Meijer White Pine Trail. It began on Friday, August 5, at 6 a.m. in Comstock Park and continued up to Cadillac and back again. The 60 percent paved and 40 percent dirt trail served as the course for 51 teams participating this year.

Carolee Cole, Community Building Development Team (CBDT) volunteer board member and Lindsay Woodard, a member of the West Michigan Trails & Greenway Coalition and marathon runner, recently met during a volunteer CBDT cleanup project of Cedar Creek. The two ladies immediately began discussing how the Cedar Springs Community might support The Fred Meijer Relay runners as they passed through our Red Flannel town.

Runner nears transfer station during 2016 Fred 200/100 mile running relay on the White Pine Trail last Saturday.

Runner nears transfer station during 2016 Fred 200/100 mile running relay on the White Pine Trail last Saturday.

West Michigan Trails and Greenways Coalition Executive Director John Morrison was on hand to see for himself not only his organization’s runners but also the development of the “Heart of Cedar Springs.” CBDT board member John Ensley showed Morrison where the North Country Trail, White Pine Trail, and the Fishing Line all intersect in the city owned property located on the northwest section of Main and Maple Streets. Morrison explained how unique and valuable this type of crossover is for all outdoor and trail enthusiasts. An additional asset includes Cedar Creek, the second largest and one of the coldest trout habitats in Michigan, which runs along these trail areas and is nestled right in the heart of Cedar Springs. A CBDT proposed project includes a boardwalk and pathway running along Cedar Creek from Main Street near the new Library location out to 17 Mile Road.

“The CBDT is always looking for opportunities to showcase our community and extend a friendly welcome,” explained Cole. Fellow CBDT Members Mark Laws, John Ensley, Autumn Mattson, and David Ringler were quick to jump on board with Cole to pull together the people and provide a bit of cheer, shaded resting areas, drinks, and food for those participating in this year’s run.

Laws was quick to thank the many businesses that provided food, drink, ice, a tent, workers, and chairs. “Our local business owners generously supported the event,” shared Laws.

Community member and 13-mile relay participant Teri Marsman was quick to thank all those involved by saying,  “This is a classy way to welcome folks to Cedar!” She went on to say, “My kids have been dropping change into Librarian Donna Clark’s ‘new library change jar’ for 16 years. Our family is so excited to see the library actually being built and know more good things are on the way for our community.”

CTA staff and student athletes welcome runners to refreshment stand

CTA staff and student athletes welcome runners to refreshment stand

CTA Athletic Director, Autumn Mattson asked CTA Cross Country Coach Miss Davies for help from her team distributing refreshments on Saturday as runners headed toward the final stretch of the relay.

“We were happy to help because it is the right thing to do,” said Casen Armstrong, a member of the CTA Cross Country Team.

Gail Zemmol, JFR team runner and captain, was quick to add, “Cedar was our best stop and we are very grateful.”

Ensley and Laws responded by promising an even better Cedar Springs welcome for next year’s event.

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ArtPrize meets Amazing Race

 

N-ArtPrize-meets-amazing-race1The sixth annual Michigan Adventure Race: ArtPrize Edition presented by Community West Credit Union will be held October 8, 2016 in Grand Rapids. The race will weave through the massive and massively popular ArtPrize festival and feature mental and/or physical challenges, many related to the ArtPrize exhibits and venues. Part bike race, part running race and part Amazing Race, the ArtPrize Edition is believed to be the only sporting event on the planet that blends a major, world-class art festival into its race course.

N-ArtPrize-meets-amazing-race2Two-person teams will start off from Ah-Nab-Awen Park in downtown Grand Rapids and bike or run to checkpoints pre-marked on a map—kept secret until just before the race—collecting as many points as they can within four hours. Racers will encounter Amazing Race-like challenges in popular downtown spots and out-of-the-way venues. Past challenges have included riddles that racers must solve related to art installations, a Pictionary-like challenge where one teammate had to draw a piece of art well enough for their teammate to enter an exhibit hall to identify, and a giant egg launch at a target.

“We’re excited that ArtPrize endorses this race as part of its social experiment. It’s a great way to expose people to out-of-the-way exhibits as well as to the electric atmosphere of the downtown venues,” says race director Mark VanTongeren. “Racers love getting in a great workout, experiencing a fun and challenging race with an Amazing Race feel, and seeing a good deal of ArtPrize all at the same time.”

Friends, family and the general public are welcome to experience the race. Maps and a guide provided at the start will direct people to the most entertaining challenges. It is a challenging race to follow however as racers head off in dozens of directions.

The charity partner selected for this edition of the race is the Purple Community, which gives 100 percent of funds raised in this race and all events to support biomedical research in the fight against cancer and neurodegenerative diseases at the Van Andel Institute.

For more information about the race, go to www.miadventurerace.com or www.facebook.com/MiAdventureRace/. They will also be holding the Michigan Adventure Race: Sleeping Bear Edition on September 17.

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Road construction on M-46 near Howard City

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Travelers should be aware that road construction started on Monday, August 8, on M-46 near Howard City.

The Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) will invest $2 million to resurface 2.4 miles of M-46 from west of US-131 to east of Federal Road, and add a center left-turn lane between US-131 and Edgar Road.

Lane closures under flag control will be in effect throughout the project.

The project is expected to be completed by Saturday, October 15.

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A Guide to saving water and your lawn

With the right watering techniques, you can save water, money and time while maintaining a healthy lawn.

With the right watering techniques, you can save water, money and time while maintaining a healthy lawn.

(StatePoint) No longer must you choose between your lawn and saving water. Experts say there are ways to save both water and money that won’t hurt your turf.

“We often see sprinklers watering sidewalks and drives, running during rain, or sending water down the drain from leaky heads,” says Josh Friell, Ph. D, senior agronomist of The Toro Company’s Center for Advanced Turf Technology. “The good news is there are simple, cost-effective actions homeowners can take to save up to 30 percent in outdoor water usage alone.”

Friell recommends these lawn-care watering tips:

First Things First

Most timed sprinklers water in the early morning, without homeowner attention. At the beginning of the season, run each zone briefly during daylight hours to see how the system is operating. Look for broken lines or damaged sprinkler heads, and inspect spray patterns to ensure water isn’t wasted.

When to Water

Experts suggest watering deeply and infrequently. This helps wet the entire root zone and encourages deeper root growth, which helps the lawn better tolerate mild to moderate drought. It is best to water in the early morning around 4 to 5 a.m., as this gives lawns time to absorb the moisture and prevents evaporation due to daytime heat.

How Much to Water

During summer, your grass should receive between 1 to 1 1/2 inches of water weekly, including natural precipitation. Water requirements vary by turf variety, local weather conditions, and site conditions such as shade. Your local university extension office can be a good source of information to assist in understanding local conditions.

The total water applied can be determined by placing a rain gauge or empty tuna cans around your yard prior to an irrigation cycle. Another option is to install a wireless soil moisture sensor, like the Toro Precision Soil Sensor, which fits almost any controller and installs in minutes. This helps eliminate guesswork by continuously monitoring soil moisture levels to prevent the system from overwatering.

Limit Water Intake

Friell says a general rule to keep in mind is that turfgrass does better when managed on the dry side rather than wet. When soil is constantly wet, grass roots are deprived of oxygen and may become more susceptible to disease.

When in Drought

Avoid lawn mowing during heat and drought. Lawns under such stress have limited ability to recover from mowing and can be damaged even more. Instead, mow after a rainfall or irrigation day. Finally, maintaining higher mowing heights will help turf tolerate the heat and drought of summer. Doing so also requires less frequent mowing, which means more time to enjoy your lawn!

Water Rebates

Many cities and water agencies across the U.S. offer water conservation and rebate programs to homeowners to encourage adoption of more efficient irrigation solutions. Find a list of the latest rebates at watersmart.toro.com/rebates/.

You can learn more about proper watering at watersmart.toro.com.

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Racing to bed for better performance

 

World-class triathletes incorporate sleep in daily training regime

Stockwell with her Purple Star and her Sleep Number bed.

Stockwell with her Purple Star and her Sleep Number bed.

(NAPS)—Swim…bike…run… sleep? Yes, that’s right. World-class triathletes Gwen Jorgensen and Melissa Stockwell say that sleep is as important as their training and nutrition routines.

Jorgensen and Stockwell represent the U.S. while competing against the world’s best athletes. Both agree that sleep is integral to their athletic performance and rely on Sleep Number® beds to ensure individualized comfort.

They’ve had very busy competitive seasons and both athletes will represent the United States at the Olympic and Paralympic Games in Rio this summer. Jorgensen, a two-time world champion, has secured multiple World Triathlon Series wins, while Stockwell is a U.S. veteran, mom, Paralympian and three-time world champion. Given the pressure and the travel, you’d think they may want to skimp on sleep to get the most out of every training opportunity…but you’d be wrong.

Jorgensen training for her 2016 race season.

Jorgensen training for her 2016 race season.

The latest sleep science is clear: sleep optimizes performance. A study by Stanford Sleep Disorders Clinic and Research Laboratory, published in SLEEP, showed that Stanford University basketball players were able to improve performance by increasing the amount of sleep they got each night. After an initial two- to four-week period of normal sleep, players were asked to increase sleep to 10 hours each night for five to seven weeks. The additional sleep resulted in faster timed sprints, improved shooting accuracy and decreased reaction times. With the additional sleep, subjects reported improved physical and mental well-being during practices and games.

“Sleep is often overlooked in training. I take my sleep very seriously when I’m preparing for a triathlon, it’s another discipline of my training,” said Jorgensen. In addition to prioritizing eight hours of shut-eye at night, Jorgensen schedules naps into her triathlon training plan to ensure her body is recovering properly. “I nap 30 minutes or less, six times a week,” she explained.

Jorgensen also loves the biometric sleep data provided by SleepIQ® technology, which is integrated into her Sleep Number bed. “I am so intrigued that my bed can track my sleep; not only do I know my biometrics—like heart rate and breathing rate—it also offers tips to help me sleep better; like a personal sleep coach!” she said. “Knowing how I slept helps me listen to my body and adjust when I need to rest or push myself in training.”

Stockwell also relies on her bed to deliver the sleep she needs in order to maximize her performance in the water, on the bike and on the road. “Our Sleep Number bed lets my husband and I individualize our comfort—to set separate Sleep Number settings. It has been wonderful to adjust the comfort of my bed as my training intensifies, and we can both sleep comfortably,” said Stockwell.

As these athletes gear up for this summer’s Olympic and Paralympic Games, they rest assured knowing that their individualized, comfortable sleep is contributing to their training routine.

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Michigan’s waters: not a good home for pet fish

 

OUT-Pet-fish-Red-belliedpacuJuly in Michigan is becoming synonymous with reports of anglers landing pacus—fish with human-like teeth used for eating nuts and seeds—in the southeastern part of the state. Last month, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources received three pacu reports—two from Lake St. Clair and one from the Port Huron area.

Reeling in a pacus would be a surprise, perhaps even a shock to anyone fishing in Michigan. Though it looks somewhat like a native shad, the pacu’s squarish, blunt teeth clearly set it apart. It isn’t similar to any native, toothed fish, including trout, muskellunge or northern pike.

The red-bellied pacu, Piaractus brachypomus, is a popular aquarium fish imported from South America. The U.S. leads the world in importing ornamental fish, supporting a worldwide aquarium industry that tops $1 billion annually.

Though the pacu is a non-native fish, it is not considered invasive in Michigan. Invasive species are defined as those that are not native and also can cause harm to the environment, the economy or human health. A 2012 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service assessment concluded the risk posed by pacus in the continental United States is uncertain due to a lack of research on the fish’s negative impacts. While the risk is uncertain for the U.S., pacus are not considered invasive in Michigan because they are tropical warm water fish that are not likely to survive the severe cold of Michigan winters.

Pacus have been caught in lakes, ponds or creeks in at least 27 U.S. states. However, there is no evidence that breeding populations have been established in any of these locations. Current climate data indicate this tropical, freshwater fish is unlikely to survive Great Lakes winters, but climate change may increase the possibility.

Finding pacus in the Great Lakes is evidence of a common dilemma; what to do when you can no longer keep an aquarium pet? Pacus are known to grow significantly, often beyond the capacity of their tanks.

“Pet release is almost never humane. Pets released from confined, artificial environments are poorly equipped to fend off predators and may be unable to successfully forage for food or find shelter,” said Nick Popoff, manager of the DNR’s Aquatic Species and Regulatory Affairs Unit. “Those that do succeed in the wild can spread exotic diseases to native animals. In the worst-case scenario, released animals can thrive and reproduce, upsetting natural ecosystems to the degree that these former pets become invasive species.”

In the case of the pacu and other ornamental fish, there is another issue.

“Invasive or not—planting fish of any kind in the waters of the state without a permit is illegal,” said Popoff. “This includes the release of aquarium fish like pacus and goldfish, as well as farm-raised fish from private ponds.”

Paige Filice of Michigan State University works with a new statewide campaign to Reduce Invasive Pet and PLant Escapes, or RIPPLE, offering solutions for aquarium and pond owners.

“If your pacu has outgrown its tank or begun to feed on your other fish, rather than releasing it into a pond or stream, consider donating or trading it with another hobbyist, an environmental learning center, an aquarium or a zoo,” said Filice. “You can also check with the pet store where you purchased the fish to see if they will take it back.”

Another option is to talk with a veterinarian or pet retailer about humane methods to dispose of the pet.

More information about the RIPPLE campaign and managing aquarium pets and plants is available from the Michigan Invasive Species website.

If you catch an unusual fish, keep it and preserve it on ice. If that is not possible, take photos of the fish. Do not return it to the water. Contact Seth Herbst, DNR aquatic invasive species biologist, at 517-284-5841 or herbsts@michigan.gov for assistance in identification.

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Work on new library site begins

The work began last week on the grounds of te new Cedar Springs Library, at the corner of Main and W. Maple.

The work began last week on the grounds of te new Cedar Springs Library, at the corner of Main and W. Maple.

Work began last week on the grounds for the new 10,016-square foot library at the corner of Main and W. Maple in Cedar Springs.

The $2 million project estimated to take about 6-8 months to complete.

It is just the first step in a wide scale project being called “The heart of Cedar Springs.” It encompasses ten acres between Maple and Pine Streets. Plans include the new library building, an amphitheater, a boardwalk along the Creek, with rain gardens and sculptures, a community building and a recreation/fitness center. There are also plans for clock tower on the corner of Main and Maple. Complementary to this Town Square development, the White Pine Trail and the North Country Trail will intersect right here in Cedar Springs.

In the meantime, there are still ways you can help the library with funding. A paving brick can be purchased for $50 for a 4×8 or $100 for an 8×8 brick. Paving bricks will be placed in front of the library building and will be highly visible to everyone using the library. With the purchase of a personalized, engraved brick, your pride and support of this project and the community will be permanently displayed.

You can also purchase a commemorative brick or block. A block can be purchased for $1,000 to be used in the retaining wall along a path on the northeast side of the new library. Donations for a retaining wall block will not only offset the cost of the retaining block and its installation but will afford you the opportunity to honor or remember a loved one, show support for your community, or advertise your business or organization. The blocks will be formed with an inset to hold an 8×10 brass plaque that can be engraved with your name, logo, or other information. There are also a limited number of capstone blocks available for $2,000.

Forms for both blocks and bricks are available from their website, cedarspringslibrary.org, and at the Cedar Springs Public Library during library hours. They are also available at Cedar Springs City Hall and Solon Township Hall.

Library ClockTower Plan WDimension.pdf

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Historical Society raises funds with car show

N-Car-show1It was like a throwback to another era seeing some of the old cars traveling the roads in town last Saturday. They were here for the Cedar Springs Historical Society’s annual car show, held last Saturday, July 30, in Morley Park.

N-Car-show2“The 2016 Summer Car Show was a wonderful success,” said Sharon Jett, Co-director at the museum. “We had 65 registered cars and more cars that did not register.”

Pat Patin filled the air with her fun oldies music and served as announcer. Marie and Nolan Patin did sand art with anyone interested in creating a little piece of art. The FFA students from Cedar Springs High School sold coffee and donuts as a fundraiser for their organization.

“Meijer Corporation brought their food bus in and served a free grilled hot dog lunch to the public,” added Jett. “They handed out hundreds of lunches and helped make our show fun for everyone.”

Behind the scenes they had many more people taking care of the museum visitors and even dealing with a plumbing disaster.

Ken Tuinstra won best of show with his 1955 Bel Air. They also named winners of the top 19 cars.

Jett said that this show is important for the money it helps raise to sustain operations without charging admission. So they are grateful to the many businesses that help sponsor the show and make it a success. “Without their generosity, this car show would not be able to support our family programs throughout the year. We are very grateful for their help,” she said.

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Students visit from Beijing

These Chinese students spent three weeks in Cedar Springs this summer.

These Chinese students spent three weeks in Cedar Springs this summer.

Almost 70 high school students from China have made an impact on Cedar Springs over the last few weeks, and will also take a little bit of Red Flannel town with them.

Tim and Shelley Bauer, directors of Network 153, a local nonprofit organization, teamed up with Pine Ridge Bible Camp for the third summer in a row, in order to work together with Lu He Cultural Training Center in Beijing to bring the students here.

Chinese students learned about some of America’s founding fathers in their ESL class this summer.

Chinese students learned about some of America’s founding fathers in their ESL class this summer.

The Chinese students are here for a three-week English Immersion program. They spend two weeks in local host families, and one week at camp. While here, they participated in twelve hours of ESL classes under the theme of “All men are created equal,” as well as visiting some of our local attractions. Not only were there guest appearances from famous Americans in their ESL classes such as George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, a pilgrim, and Paul Revere, but they also learned of our struggles as a nation with racism and prejudice. An African American, and a Native American Indian speaker also shared their cultural difficulties within our land. Whether Chinese or American, it was very moving for all who heard them share their hearts.

The students cleaned the Kent Theatre as part of a community service project.

The students cleaned the Kent Theatre as part of a community service project.

The students also did a thorough cleaning of the Kent Theater in Cedar Springs, as part of a community service project.

The students’ final week is spent having fun at Pine Ridge Bible Camp August 1-6. When they leave, they hope to take some copies of the Cedar Springs Post back with them to Beijing.

The Bauers and Pine Ridge Camp are grateful for this exciting relationship with those from the other side of the world. They hope to visit Lu He next year in Beijing for their 150th anniversary. The school was founded in 1867 by American Christian missionaries, and many of the buildings on campus have American names after those who first began their school. It is a growing relationship that the Bauers pray blesses both countries.

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The Post travels to Germany

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The Post recently traveled to Dresden, Germany, with Kim Gillow and Mary Balon, of Solon Township, and their friend Harry Eastwood, of Australia. They spent two weeks travelling through Poland, Germany, and Austria visiting important WWII sites, including concentration camps, the Nuremburg courthouse and Hitler’s Eagle’s Nest. This picture was taken half way through the trip in the town square in Dresden.

“Every day was interesting and informative,” said Kim, “and the local guides were wonderful.”

Thanks for taking us to Germany with you!

Are you going on vacation? Take the Post with you and snap some photos. Then send them to us with some info to news@cedarspringspost.com or mail them to Post travels, PO Box 370, Cedar Springs, MI 49319. We will be looking for yours!

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